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Documents authored by Miller, Mark


Found 2 Possible Name Variants:

Miller, Mark

Document
Comparative Visualization Using Cross-Mesh Field Evaluations and Derived Quantities

Authors: Hank Childs, Sean Ahern, Jeremy Meredith, Mark Miller, and Kenneth I. Joy

Published in: Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors (2011)


Abstract
We present a data-level comparative visualization system that utilizes two key pieces of technology: (1) cross-mesh field evaluation - algorithms to evaluate a field from one mesh onto another - and (2) a highly flexible system for creating new derived quantities. In contrast to previous comparative visualization efforts, which focused on "A-B" comparisons, our system is able to compare many related simulations in a single analysis. Types of possible novel comparisons include comparisons of ensembles of data generated through parameter studies, or comparisons of time-varying data. All portions of the system have been parallelized and our results are applicable to petascale data sets.

Cite as

Hank Childs, Sean Ahern, Jeremy Meredith, Mark Miller, and Kenneth I. Joy. Comparative Visualization Using Cross-Mesh Field Evaluations and Derived Quantities. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 59-72, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{childs_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.59,
  author =	{Childs, Hank and Ahern, Sean and Meredith, Jeremy and Miller, Mark and Joy, Kenneth I.},
  title =	{{Comparative Visualization Using Cross-Mesh Field Evaluations and Derived Quantities}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{59--72},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.59},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32870},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.59},
  annote =	{Keywords: Comparative Visualization, Cross-Mesh Field Evaluation, Derived Quantity}
}

Miller, Mark S.

Document
Uncanny Valleys in Declarative Language Design

Authors: Mark S. Miller, Daniel von Dincklage, Vuk Ercegovac, and Brian Chin

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 71, 2nd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2017)


Abstract
When people write programs in conventional programming languages, they over-specify how to solve the problem they have in mind. Over-specification prevents the language's implementation from making many optimization decisions, leaving programmers with this burden. In more declarative languages, programmers over-specify less, enabling the implementation to make more choices for them. As these decisions improve, programmers shift more attention from implementation to their real problems. This process easily overshoots. When under-specified programs almost always work well enough, programmers rarely need to think about implementation details. As their understanding of implementation choices atrophies, the controls provided so they can override these decisions become obscure. Our declarative language project, Yedalog, is in the midst of this dilemma. The improvements in question make our users more productive, so we cannot simply retreat back towards over-specification. To proceed forward instead, we must meet some of the expectations we prematurely provoked, and our implementation's behavior must help users learn expectations more aligned with our intended semantics. These are general issues. Discussing their concrete manifestation in Yedalog should help other declarative systems that come to face these issues.

Cite as

Mark S. Miller, Daniel von Dincklage, Vuk Ercegovac, and Brian Chin. Uncanny Valleys in Declarative Language Design. In 2nd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2017). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 71, pp. 9:1-9:12, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@InProceedings{miller_et_al:LIPIcs.SNAPL.2017.9,
  author =	{Miller, Mark S. and von Dincklage, Daniel and Ercegovac, Vuk and Chin, Brian},
  title =	{{Uncanny Valleys in Declarative Language Design}},
  booktitle =	{2nd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2017)},
  pages =	{9:1--9:12},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-032-3},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{71},
  editor =	{Lerner, Benjamin S. and Bod{\'\i}k, Rastislav and Krishnamurthi, Shriram},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2017.9},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-71299},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2017.9},
  annote =	{Keywords: Declarative logic programming language}
}
Document
The Elements of Decision Alignment

Authors: Mark S. Miller and Bill Tulloh

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 56, 30th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2016)


Abstract
When one object makes a request of another, why do we expect that the second object's behavior correctly satisfies the first object's wishes? The need to cope with such principal-agent problems shapes programming practice as much as it shapes human organizations and economies. However, the literature about such plan coordination issues among humans is almost disjoint from the literature about these issues among objects. Even the terms used are unrelated. These fields have much to learn from each other---both from their similarities and from the causes of their differences. We propose a framework for thinking about decision alignment as a bridge between these disciplines.

Cite as

Mark S. Miller and Bill Tulloh. The Elements of Decision Alignment. In 30th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2016). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 56, pp. 17:1-17:5, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2016)


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@InProceedings{miller_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2016.17,
  author =	{Miller, Mark S. and Tulloh, Bill},
  title =	{{The Elements of Decision Alignment}},
  booktitle =	{30th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2016)},
  pages =	{17:1--17:5},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-014-9},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2016},
  volume =	{56},
  editor =	{Krishnamurthi, Shriram and Lerner, Benjamin S.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2016.17},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-61111},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2016.17},
  annote =	{Keywords: economics, law, contracts, principal-agent problem, incentive alignment, least authority, verification}
}
Document
Yedalog: Exploring Knowledge at Scale

Authors: Brian Chin, Daniel von Dincklage, Vuk Ercegovac, Peter Hawkins, Mark S. Miller, Franz Och, Christopher Olston, and Fernando Pereira

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 32, 1st Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2015)


Abstract
With huge progress on data processing frameworks, human programmers are frequently the bottleneck when analyzing large repositories of data. We introduce Yedalog, a declarative programming language that allows programmers to mix data-parallel pipelines and computation seamlessly in a single language. By contrast, most existing tools for data-parallel computation embed a sublanguage of data-parallel pipelines in a general-purpose language, or vice versa. Yedalog extends Datalog, incorporating not only computational features from logic programming, but also features for working with data structured as nested records. Yedalog programs can run both on a single machine, and distributed across a cluster in batch and interactive modes, allowing programmers to mix different modes of execution easily.

Cite as

Brian Chin, Daniel von Dincklage, Vuk Ercegovac, Peter Hawkins, Mark S. Miller, Franz Och, Christopher Olston, and Fernando Pereira. Yedalog: Exploring Knowledge at Scale. In 1st Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2015). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 32, pp. 63-78, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2015)


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@InProceedings{chin_et_al:LIPIcs.SNAPL.2015.63,
  author =	{Chin, Brian and von Dincklage, Daniel and Ercegovac, Vuk and Hawkins, Peter and Miller, Mark S. and Och, Franz and Olston, Christopher and Pereira, Fernando},
  title =	{{Yedalog: Exploring Knowledge at Scale}},
  booktitle =	{1st Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2015)},
  pages =	{63--78},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-80-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2015},
  volume =	{32},
  editor =	{Ball, Thomas and Bodík, Rastislav and Krishnamurthi, Shriram and Lerner, Benjamin S. and Morriset, Greg},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2015.63},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-50172},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2015.63},
  annote =	{Keywords: Datalog, MapReduce}
}