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A Universal Session Type for Untyped Asynchronous Communication

Authors Stephanie Balzer, Frank Pfenning, Bernardo Toninho



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Author Details

Stephanie Balzer
  • Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Frank Pfenning
  • Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Bernardo Toninho
  • NOVA LINCS, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal

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Stephanie Balzer, Frank Pfenning, and Bernardo Toninho. A Universal Session Type for Untyped Asynchronous Communication. In 29th International Conference on Concurrency Theory (CONCUR 2018). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 118, pp. 30:1-30:18, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)
https://doi.org/10.4230/LIPIcs.CONCUR.2018.30

Abstract

In the simply-typed lambda-calculus we can recover the full range of expressiveness of the untyped lambda-calculus solely by adding a single recursive type U = U -> U. In contrast, in the session-typed pi-calculus, recursion alone is insufficient to recover the untyped pi-calculus, primarily due to linearity: each channel just has two unique endpoints. In this paper, we show that shared channels with a corresponding sharing semantics (based on the language SILL_S developed in prior work) are enough to embed the untyped asynchronous pi-calculus via a universal shared session type U_S. We show that our encoding of the asynchronous pi-calculus satisfies operational correspondence and preserves observable actions (i.e., processes are weakly bisimilar to their encoding). Moreover, we clarify the expressiveness of SILL_S by developing an operationally correct encoding of SILL_S in the asynchronous pi-calculus.

Subject Classification

ACM Subject Classification
  • Theory of computation → Process calculi
  • Theory of computation → Linear logic
Keywords
  • Session types
  • sharing
  • pi-calculus
  • bisimulation

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