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Can Computational Meta-Documentary Linguistics Provide for Accountability and Offer an Alternative to "Reproducibility" in Linguistics?

Author Tobias Weber



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Author Details

Tobias Weber
  • Institut für Finnougristik, LMU Munich, Germany

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Tobias Weber. Can Computational Meta-Documentary Linguistics Provide for Accountability and Offer an Alternative to "Reproducibility" in Linguistics?. In 2nd Conference on Language, Data and Knowledge (LDK 2019). Open Access Series in Informatics (OASIcs), Volume 70, pp. 26:1-26:8, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)
https://doi.org/10.4230/OASIcs.LDK.2019.26

Abstract

As an answer to the need for accountability in linguistics, computational methodology and big data approaches offer an interesting perspective to the field of meta-documentary linguistics. The focus of this paper lies on the scientific process of citing published data and the insights this gives to the workings of a discipline. The proposed methodology shall aid to bring out the narratives of linguistic research within the literature. This can be seen as an alternative, philological approach to documentary linguistics.

Subject Classification

ACM Subject Classification
  • Applied computing
  • Applied computing → Anthropology
  • Applied computing → Publishing
Keywords
  • Language Documentation
  • meta-documentary Linguistics
  • Citation
  • Methodology
  • Digital Humanities
  • Philology
  • Intertextuality

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References

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