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Documents authored by Riener, Andreas


Document
Radical Innovation and Design for Connected and Automated Vehicles (Dagstuhl Seminar 22222)

Authors: Wendy Ju, Bastian Pfleging, and Andreas Riener

Published in: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 12, Issue 5 (2022)


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 22222 "Radical Innovation and Design for Connected and Automated Vehicles". Automated driving will most likely be the next big change in individual mobility. While research is still primarily concerned with technical challenges of Automated Driving Systems (ADS), HCI researchers and designers already started to develop concepts on how to use privately owned ADS as a space for non-driving-related activities, going beyond what is possible today. There is, however, room to think about creative ways to use automated vehicles (AV) and connected technology towards the public interest beyond incremental changes, which is what we addressed in this seminar. We challenged the current generative/evaluative research approach for automated driving systems against a radical innovations attempt and questioned whether the current incremental research approach is appropriate for the development of future vehicles. As an integral part of the seminar we wanted participants to learn from each other and to disseminate each individual’s experience for boosting subsequent research by trying out different methods that support the "out of the box" thinking (e.g., brainwriting, bodystorming, focus groups, World Café, amongst others).

Cite as

Wendy Ju, Bastian Pfleging, and Andreas Riener. Radical Innovation and Design for Connected and Automated Vehicles (Dagstuhl Seminar 22222). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 12, Issue 5, pp. 188-230, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@Article{ju_et_al:DagRep.12.5.188,
  author =	{Ju, Wendy and Pfleging, Bastian and Riener, Andreas},
  title =	{{Radical Innovation and Design for Connected and Automated Vehicles (Dagstuhl Seminar 22222)}},
  pages =	{188--230},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{12},
  number =	{5},
  editor =	{Ju, Wendy and Pfleging, Bastian and Riener, Andreas},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.12.5.188},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-174480},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.12.5.188},
  annote =	{Keywords: Racidal Innovation, Automated Driving, Future Mobility, Sustainability}
}
Document
Human-Computer Interaction to Support Work and Wellbeing in Mobile Environments (Dagstuhl Seminar 21232)

Authors: Stephen Brewster, Andrew Kun, Andreas Riener, and Orit Shaer

Published in: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 5 (2021)


Abstract
We are living in a world where ubiquitous computing devices are becoming parts of the fabric of our lives. At work and at school, devices such as calculators, tablet computers, mobile phones, and different electronic measurement devices, support our work and learning. Building on all of these technological advancements will be novel human-computer interaction techniques that will allow us to use the devices for work and play in a broad set of circumstances, from riding in automated vehicles, to exploring museums, to walking on the street, to playing with our kids on the beach. The central underlying question Dagstuhl seminar 21232 wanted to address is, "how will we interact with the ubiquitous devices of our near (and not-so-near) future?" To date, there are a number of interaction techniques that show significant promise, including speech, augmented reality, tangible objects, gesture, multitouch screens, as well as simple keyboards and non-touch displays. But, before we address technologies to use, we must first identify the economic and broad societal driving forces that will create the need for interaction with our ubiquitous computing devices. From the economic point of view worker well-being is one such driving force; another one is the need to improve the productivity of workers and firms; yet another is the need to provide access to continuous education to a changing workforce. From the broad perspective of our society, it is important for us to understand how ubiquitous technologies can support living a meaningful and fulfilling life, from childhood to adulthood. In the following, we report the program, activities, and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 21232 "Human-Computer Interaction to Support Work and Wellbeing in Mobile Environments".

Cite as

Stephen Brewster, Andrew Kun, Andreas Riener, and Orit Shaer. Human-Computer Interaction to Support Work and Wellbeing in Mobile Environments (Dagstuhl Seminar 21232). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 5, pp. 23-53, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2021)


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@Article{brewster_et_al:DagRep.11.5.23,
  author =	{Brewster, Stephen and Kun, Andrew and Riener, Andreas and Shaer, Orit},
  title =	{{Human-Computer Interaction to Support Work and Wellbeing in Mobile Environments (Dagstuhl Seminar 21232)}},
  pages =	{23--53},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2021},
  volume =	{11},
  number =	{5},
  editor =	{Brewster, Stephen and Kun, Andrew and Riener, Andreas and Shaer, Orit},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.11.5.23},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-155693},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.11.5.23},
  annote =	{Keywords: (Productive) Work, Ergonomics, Human-computer interaction, Wellbeing}
}
Document
Users and automated driving systems: How will we interact with tomorrow's vehicles? (Dagstuhl Seminar 19132)

Authors: Susanne Boll, Andrew L. Kun, Andreas Riener, and C.Y. David Yang

Published in: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3 (2019)


Abstract
In today's vehicles, the driving task is increasingly often shared between the driver and the vehicle. It is expected that this will become the norm rather than the exception in the foreseeable future: on some road segments the driving task will be automated, and drivers will become passengers. Thus, we need to design automotive user interfaces with partial automation, and even full automation, in mind. This was the underlying motivation to propose and run this seminar. In the Dagstuhl seminar, six inter-related key research questions were addressed: First, "how to design user interfaces to support the driver's transition back from the role of passenger to the role of driver?". Second, "how user interfaces can support work and play for drivers while the vehicle is controlled by automation?" and third "how we can support communication between all transportation users, from drivers, to pedestrians, to bicyclists?". Furthermore, we explored "how the design of automotive user interfaces affects trust in automation?" and finally discussed "how novel technologies, such as augmented reality displays or advanced spoken dialogue systems can support drivers, and others, in and around partially-, and fully-automated vehicles?". As an umbrella topic, the question "how all of these questions relate to the legal aspects of deploying automotive user interfaces?" received also high attention and lively discussions amongst participants. Dagstuhl seminar 19132 is a follow-up of the 2016 Dagstuhl seminar 16262 "Automotive User Interfaces in the Age of Automation" and brought (again) together researchers from HCI, psychology, cognitive science, human factors, automotive industry/OEMs and people active in the standardization process to discuss critical problems on the way to automated driving.

Cite as

Susanne Boll, Andrew L. Kun, Andreas Riener, and C.Y. David Yang. Users and automated driving systems: How will we interact with tomorrow's vehicles? (Dagstuhl Seminar 19132). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp. 111-178, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{boll_et_al:DagRep.9.3.111,
  author =	{Boll, Susanne and Kun, Andrew L. and Riener, Andreas and Yang, C.Y. David},
  title =	{{Users and automated driving systems: How will we interact with tomorrow's vehicles? (Dagstuhl Seminar 19132)}},
  pages =	{111--178},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{3},
  editor =	{Boll, Susanne and Kun, Andrew L. and Riener, Andreas and Yang, C.Y. David},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.3.111},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-112944},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.3.111},
  annote =	{Keywords: Automotive UIs; Driver-vehicle interaction services; UX in driving; Customization of vehicles/UIs; (Over)trust; Ethical issues}
}
Document
Automotive User Interfaces in the Age of Automation (Dagstuhl Seminar 16262)

Authors: Andreas Riener, Susanne Boll, and Andrew L. Kun

Published in: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 6, Issue 6 (2016)


Abstract
The next big change in the automotive domain will be the move towards automated and semi-automated driving. We can expect an increasing level of autonomous driving in the coming years, resulting in new opportunities for the car as an infotainment platform when standard driving tasks will be automated. This change also comes with a number of challenges to automotive user interfaces. Core challenges for the assistance system and the user interface will be distributing tasks between the assistance system and the driver, the re-engagement of drivers in semi-automated driving back to the driving task, and collaborative driving in which cars collectively work together (e.g., platoons). Overall, in the coming years we will need to design interfaces and applications that make driving safe while enabling communication, work, and play in human-operated vehicles. This Dagstuhl seminar brought together researchers from human computer interaction, cognitive psychology, human factors psychology and also from automotive industry and OEMs to discuss the new interface paradigms for (semi-)automated driving.

Cite as

Andreas Riener, Susanne Boll, and Andrew L. Kun. Automotive User Interfaces in the Age of Automation (Dagstuhl Seminar 16262). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 6, Issue 6, pp. 111-157, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2016)


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@Article{riener_et_al:DagRep.6.6.111,
  author =	{Riener, Andreas and Boll, Susanne and Kun, Andrew L.},
  title =	{{Automotive User Interfaces in the Age of Automation (Dagstuhl Seminar 16262)}},
  pages =	{111--157},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2016},
  volume =	{6},
  number =	{6},
  editor =	{Riener, Andreas and Boll, Susanne and Kun, Andrew L.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.6.6.111},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-67582},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.6.6.111},
  annote =	{Keywords: Automotive UIs; Driver-vehicle interaction services; UX in driving; Customization of vehicles/UIs; (Over)trust; Ethical issues}
}
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