6 Search Results for "Jezek, Kamil"


Document
Contracts in the Wild: A Study of Java Programs (Artifact)

Authors: Jens Dietrich, David J. Pearce, Kamil Jezek, and Premek Brada

Published in: DARTS, Volume 3, Issue 2, Special Issue of the 31st European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2017)


Abstract
This artefact contains a dataset of open-source programs obtained from the Maven Central Repository and scripts that first extract contracts from these programs and then perform several analyses on the contracts extracted. The extraction and analysis is fully automated and directly produces the tables presented in the accompanying paper. The results show how contracts are used in real-world program, and how their usage changes between versions and within inheritance hierarchies.

Cite as

Jens Dietrich, David J. Pearce, Kamil Jezek, and Premek Brada. Contracts in the Wild: A Study of Java Programs (Artifact). In Special Issue of the 31st European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2017). Dagstuhl Artifacts Series (DARTS), Volume 3, Issue 2, pp. 6:1-6:4, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@Article{dietrich_et_al:DARTS.3.2.6,
  author =	{Dietrich, Jens and Pearce, David J. and Jezek, Kamil and Brada, Premek},
  title =	{{Contracts in the Wild: A Study of Java Programs (Artifact)}},
  pages =	{6:1--6:4},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Artifacts Series},
  ISSN =	{2509-8195},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{3},
  number =	{2},
  editor =	{Dietrich, Jens and Pearce, David J. and Jezek, Kamil and Brada, Premek},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DARTS.3.2.6},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-72871},
  doi =		{10.4230/DARTS.3.2.6},
  annote =	{Keywords: verification, design-by-contract, assertions, preconditions, postconditions, runtime checking, java, input validation}
}
Document
Evil Pickles: DoS Attacks Based on Object-Graph Engineering (Artifact)

Authors: Jens Dietrich, Kamil Jezek, Shawn Rasheed, Amjed Tahir, and Alex Potanin

Published in: DARTS, Volume 3, Issue 2, Special Issue of the 31st European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2017)


Abstract
This artefact demonstrates the effects of the serialisation vulnerabilities described in the companion paper. It is composed of three components: scripts, including source code, for Java, Ruby and C# serialisation-vulnerabilities, two case studies that demonstrate attacks based on the vulnerabilities, and a contracts-based mitigation strategy for serialisation-based attacks on Java applications. The artefact allows users to witness how the serialisation-based vulnerabilities result in behavior that can be used in security attacks. It also supports the repeatability of the case study experiments and the benchmark for the mitigation measures proposed in the paper. Instructions for running the tasks are provided along with a description of the artefact setup.

Cite as

Jens Dietrich, Kamil Jezek, Shawn Rasheed, Amjed Tahir, and Alex Potanin. Evil Pickles: DoS Attacks Based on Object-Graph Engineering (Artifact). In Special Issue of the 31st European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2017). Dagstuhl Artifacts Series (DARTS), Volume 3, Issue 2, pp. 13:1-13:3, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@Article{dietrich_et_al:DARTS.3.2.13,
  author =	{Dietrich, Jens and Jezek, Kamil and Rasheed, Shawn and Tahir, Amjed and Potanin, Alex},
  title =	{{Evil Pickles: DoS Attacks Based on Object-Graph Engineering (Artifact)}},
  pages =	{13:1--13:3},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Artifacts Series},
  ISSN =	{2509-8195},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{3},
  number =	{2},
  editor =	{Dietrich, Jens and Jezek, Kamil and Rasheed, Shawn and Tahir, Amjed and Potanin, Alex},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DARTS.3.2.13},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-72944},
  doi =		{10.4230/DARTS.3.2.13},
  annote =	{Keywords: serialisation, denial of service, degradation of service, Java, C#, JavaScript, Ruby, vulnerabilities, library design, collection libraries}
}
Document
Contracts in the Wild: A Study of Java Programs

Authors: Jens Dietrich, David J. Pearce, Kamil Jezek, and Premek Brada

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 74, 31st European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2017)


Abstract
The use of formal contracts has long been advocated as an approach to develop programs that are provably correct. However, the reality is that adoption of contracts has been slow in practice. Despite this, the adoption of lightweight contracts — typically utilising runtime checking — has progressed. In the case of Java, built-in features of the language (e.g. assertions and exceptions) can be used for this. Furthermore, a number of libraries which facilitate contract checking have arisen. In this paper, we catalogue 25 techniques and tools for lightweight contract checking in Java, and present the results of an empirical study looking at a dataset extracted from the 200 most popular projects found on Maven Central, constituting roughly 351,034 KLOC. We examine (1) the extent to which contracts are used and (2) what kind of contracts are used. We then investigate how contracts are used to safeguard code, and study problems in the context of two types of substitutability that can be guarded by contracts: (3) unsafe evolution of APIs that may break client programs and (4) violations of Liskovs Substitution Principle (LSP) when methods are overridden. We find that: (1) a wide range of techniques and constructs are used to represent contracts, and often the same program uses different techniques at the same time; (2) overall, contracts are used less than expected, with significant differences between programs; (3) projects that use contracts continue to do so, and expand the use of contracts as they grow and evolve; and, (4) there are cases where the use of contracts points to unsafe subtyping (violations of Liskov's Substitution Principle) and unsafe evolution.

Cite as

Jens Dietrich, David J. Pearce, Kamil Jezek, and Premek Brada. Contracts in the Wild: A Study of Java Programs. In 31st European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2017). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 74, pp. 9:1-9:29, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@InProceedings{dietrich_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2017.9,
  author =	{Dietrich, Jens and Pearce, David J. and Jezek, Kamil and Brada, Premek},
  title =	{{Contracts in the Wild: A Study of Java Programs}},
  booktitle =	{31st European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2017)},
  pages =	{9:1--9:29},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-035-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{74},
  editor =	{M\"{u}ller, Peter},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2017.9},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-72590},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2017.9},
  annote =	{Keywords: verification, design-by-contract, assertions, preconditions, postconditions, runtime checking, java, input validation}
}
Document
Evil Pickles: DoS Attacks Based on Object-Graph Engineering

Authors: Jens Dietrich, Kamil Jezek, Shawn Rasheed, Amjed Tahir, and Alex Potanin

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 74, 31st European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2017)


Abstract
In recent years, multiple vulnerabilities exploiting the serialisation APIs of various programming languages, including Java, have been discovered. These vulnerabilities can be used to devise in- jection attacks, exploiting the presence of dynamic programming language features like reflection or dynamic proxies. In this paper, we investigate a new type of serialisation-related vulnerabilit- ies for Java that exploit the topology of object graphs constructed from classes of the standard library in a way that deserialisation leads to resource exhaustion, facilitating denial of service attacks. We analyse three such vulnerabilities that can be exploited to exhaust stack memory, heap memory and CPU time. We discuss the language and library design features that enable these vulnerabilities, and investigate whether these vulnerabilities can be ported to C#, Java- Script and Ruby. We present two case studies that demonstrate how the vulnerabilities can be used in attacks on two widely used servers, Jenkins deployed on Tomcat and JBoss. Finally, we propose a mitigation strategy based on contract injection.

Cite as

Jens Dietrich, Kamil Jezek, Shawn Rasheed, Amjed Tahir, and Alex Potanin. Evil Pickles: DoS Attacks Based on Object-Graph Engineering. In 31st European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2017). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 74, pp. 10:1-10:32, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@InProceedings{dietrich_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2017.10,
  author =	{Dietrich, Jens and Jezek, Kamil and Rasheed, Shawn and Tahir, Amjed and Potanin, Alex},
  title =	{{Evil Pickles: DoS Attacks Based on Object-Graph Engineering}},
  booktitle =	{31st European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2017)},
  pages =	{10:1--10:32},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-035-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{74},
  editor =	{M\"{u}ller, Peter},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2017.10},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-72606},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2017.10},
  annote =	{Keywords: serialisation, denial of service, degradation of service, Java, C#, JavaScript, Ruby, vulnerabilities, library design, collection libraries}
}
Document
Magic with Dynamo -- Flexible Cross-Component Linking for Java with Invokedynamic

Authors: Kamil Jezek and Jens Dietrich

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 56, 30th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2016)


Abstract
Modern software systems are not built from scratch. They use functionality provided by libraries. These libraries evolve and often upgrades are deployed without the systems being recompiled. In Java, this process is particularly error-prone due to the mismatch between source and binary compatibility, and the lack of API stability in many popular libraries. We propose a novel approach to mitigate this problem based on the use of invokedynamic instructions for cross-component method invocations. The dispatch mechanism of invokedynamic is used to provide on-the-fly signature adaptation. We show how this idea can be used to construct a Java compiler that produces more resilient bytecode. We present the dynamo compiler, a proof-of-concept implemented as a javac post compiler. We evaluate our approach using several benchmark examples and two case studies showing how the dynamo compiler can prevent certain types of linkage and stack overflow errors that have been observed in real-world systems.

Cite as

Kamil Jezek and Jens Dietrich. Magic with Dynamo -- Flexible Cross-Component Linking for Java with Invokedynamic. In 30th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2016). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 56, pp. 12:1-12:25, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2016)


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@InProceedings{jezek_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2016.12,
  author =	{Jezek, Kamil and Dietrich, Jens},
  title =	{{Magic with Dynamo -- Flexible Cross-Component Linking for Java with Invokedynamic}},
  booktitle =	{30th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2016)},
  pages =	{12:1--12:25},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-014-9},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2016},
  volume =	{56},
  editor =	{Krishnamurthi, Shriram and Lerner, Benjamin S.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2016.12},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-61068},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2016.12},
  annote =	{Keywords: Java, compilation, linking, binary compatibility, invokedynamic}
}
Document
Magic with Dynamo – Flexible Cross-Component Linking for Java with Invokedynamic (Artifact)

Authors: Kamil Jezek and Jens Dietrich

Published in: DARTS, Volume 2, Issue 1, Special Issue of the 30th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2016)


Abstract
Modern software systems are not built from scratch. They use functionality provided by libraries. These libraries evolve and often upgrades are deployed without the systems being recompiled. In Java, this process is particularly error-prone due to the mismatch between source and binary compatibility, and the lack of API stability in many popular libraries. We propose a novel approach to mitigate this problem based on the use of invokedynamic instructions for cross-component method invocations. The dispatch mechanism of invokedynamic is used to provide on-the-fly signature adaptation. We show how this idea can be used to construct a Java compiler that produces more resilient bytecode. We present the dynamo compiler, a proof-of-concept implemented as javac post compiler, and evaluate our approach using several benchmark examples and two case studies showing how the use of the dynamo compiler can prevent certain types of linkage and stack overflow errors that have been observed in real-world systems.

Cite as

Kamil Jezek and Jens Dietrich. Magic with Dynamo – Flexible Cross-Component Linking for Java with Invokedynamic (Artifact). In Special Issue of the 30th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2016). Dagstuhl Artifacts Series (DARTS), Volume 2, Issue 1, pp. 5:1-5:2, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2016)


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@Article{jezek_et_al:DARTS.2.1.5,
  author =	{Jezek, Kamil and Dietrich, Jens},
  title =	{{Magic with Dynamo – Flexible Cross-Component Linking for Java with Invokedynamic (Artifact)}},
  pages =	{5:1--5:2},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Artifacts Series},
  ISSN =	{2509-8195},
  year =	{2016},
  volume =	{2},
  number =	{1},
  editor =	{Jezek, Kamil and Dietrich, Jens},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DARTS.2.1.5},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-61260},
  doi =		{10.4230/DARTS.2.1.5},
  annote =	{Keywords: Java, compilation, linking, binary compatibility, invokedynamic}
}
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