9 Search Results for "Preguiça, Nuno"


Document
VeriFx: Correct Replicated Data Types for the Masses

Authors: Kevin De Porre, Carla Ferreira, and Elisa Gonzalez Boix

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 263, 37th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2023)


Abstract
Distributed systems adopt weak consistency to ensure high availability and low latency, but state convergence is hard to guarantee due to conflicts. Experts carefully design replicated data types (RDTs) that resemble sequential data types and embed conflict resolution mechanisms that ensure convergence. Designing RDTs is challenging as their correctness depends on subtleties such as the ordering of concurrent operations. Currently, researchers manually verify RDTs, either by paper proofs or using proof assistants. Unfortunately, paper proofs are subject to reasoning flaws and mechanized proofs verify a formalization instead of a real-world implementation. Furthermore, writing mechanized proofs is reserved for verification experts and is extremely time-consuming. To simplify the design, implementation, and verification of RDTs, we propose VeriFx, a specialized programming language for RDTs with automated proof capabilities. VeriFx lets programmers implement RDTs atop functional collections and express correctness properties that are verified automatically. Verified RDTs can be transpiled to mainstream languages (currently Scala and JavaScript). VeriFx provides libraries for implementing and verifying Conflict-free Replicated Data Types (CRDTs) and Operational Transformation (OT) functions. These libraries implement the general execution model of those approaches and define their correctness properties. We use the libraries to implement and verify an extensive portfolio of 51 CRDTs, 16 of which are used in industrial databases, and reproduce a study on the correctness of OT functions.

Cite as

Kevin De Porre, Carla Ferreira, and Elisa Gonzalez Boix. VeriFx: Correct Replicated Data Types for the Masses. In 37th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2023). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 263, pp. 9:1-9:45, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2023)


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@InProceedings{deporre_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2023.9,
  author =	{De Porre, Kevin and Ferreira, Carla and Gonzalez Boix, Elisa},
  title =	{{VeriFx: Correct Replicated Data Types for the Masses}},
  booktitle =	{37th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2023)},
  pages =	{9:1--9:45},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-281-5},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2023},
  volume =	{263},
  editor =	{Ali, Karim and Salvaneschi, Guido},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2023.9},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-182028},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2023.9},
  annote =	{Keywords: distributed systems, eventual consistency, replicated data types, verification}
}
Document
Robustness Against Transactional Causal Consistency

Authors: Sidi Mohamed Beillahi, Ahmed Bouajjani, and Constantin Enea

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 140, 30th International Conference on Concurrency Theory (CONCUR 2019)


Abstract
Distributed storage systems and databases are widely used by various types of applications. Transactional access to these storage systems is an important abstraction allowing application programmers to consider blocks of actions (i.e., transactions) as executing atomically. For performance reasons, the consistency models implemented by modern databases are weaker than the standard serializability model, which corresponds to the atomicity abstraction of transactions executing over a sequentially consistent memory. Causal consistency for instance is one such model that is widely used in practice. In this paper, we investigate application-specific relationships between several variations of causal consistency and we address the issue of verifying automatically if a given transactional program is robust against causal consistency, i.e., all its behaviors when executed over an arbitrary causally consistent database are serializable. We show that programs without write-write races have the same set of behaviors under all these variations, and we show that checking robustness is polynomial time reducible to a state reachability problem in transactional programs over a sequentially consistent shared memory. A surprising corollary of the latter result is that causal consistency variations which admit incomparable sets of behaviors admit comparable sets of robust programs. This reduction also opens the door to leveraging existing methods and tools for the verification of concurrent programs (assuming sequential consistency) for reasoning about programs running over causally consistent databases. Furthermore, it allows to establish that the problem of checking robustness is decidable when the programs executed at different sites are finite-state.

Cite as

Sidi Mohamed Beillahi, Ahmed Bouajjani, and Constantin Enea. Robustness Against Transactional Causal Consistency. In 30th International Conference on Concurrency Theory (CONCUR 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 140, pp. 30:1-30:18, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{beillahi_et_al:LIPIcs.CONCUR.2019.30,
  author =	{Beillahi, Sidi Mohamed and Bouajjani, Ahmed and Enea, Constantin},
  title =	{{Robustness Against Transactional Causal Consistency}},
  booktitle =	{30th International Conference on Concurrency Theory (CONCUR 2019)},
  pages =	{30:1--30:18},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-121-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{140},
  editor =	{Fokkink, Wan and van Glabbeek, Rob},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.CONCUR.2019.30},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-109321},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.CONCUR.2019.30},
  annote =	{Keywords: Distributed Databases, Causal Consistency, Model Checking}
}
Document
Toward Domain-Specific Solvers for Distributed Consistency

Authors: Lindsey Kuper and Peter Alvaro

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 136, 3rd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2019)


Abstract
To guard against machine failures, modern internet services store multiple replicas of the same application data within and across data centers, which introduces the problem of keeping geo-distributed replicas consistent with one another in the face of network partitions and unpredictable message latency. To avoid costly and conservative synchronization protocols, many real-world systems provide only weak consistency guarantees (e.g., eventual, causal, or PRAM consistency), which permit certain kinds of disagreement among replicas. There has been much recent interest in language support for specifying and verifying such consistency properties. Although these properties are usually beyond the scope of what traditional type checkers or compiler analyses can guarantee, solver-aided languages are up to the task. Inspired by systems like Liquid Haskell [Vazou et al., 2014] and Rosette [Torlak and Bodik, 2014], we believe that close integration between a language and a solver is the right path to consistent-by-construction distributed applications. Unfortunately, verifying distributed consistency properties requires reasoning about transitive relations (e.g., causality or happens-before), partial orders (e.g., the lattice of replica states under a convergent merge operation), and properties relevant to message processing or API invocation (e.g., commutativity and idempotence) that cannot be easily or efficiently carried out by general-purpose SMT solvers that lack native support for this kind of reasoning. We argue that domain-specific SMT-based tools that exploit the mathematical foundations of distributed consistency would enable both more efficient verification and improved ease of use for domain experts. The principle of exploiting domain knowledge for efficiency and expressivity that has borne fruit elsewhere - such as in the development of high-performance domain-specific languages that trade off generality to gain both performance and productivity - also applies here. Languages augmented with domain-specific, consistency-aware solvers would support the rapid implementation of formally verified programming abstractions that guarantee distributed consistency. In the long run, we aim to democratize the development of such domain-specific solvers by creating a framework for domain-specific solver development that brings new theory solver implementation within the reach of programmers who are not necessarily SMT solver internals experts.

Cite as

Lindsey Kuper and Peter Alvaro. Toward Domain-Specific Solvers for Distributed Consistency. In 3rd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 136, pp. 10:1-10:14, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{kuper_et_al:LIPIcs.SNAPL.2019.10,
  author =	{Kuper, Lindsey and Alvaro, Peter},
  title =	{{Toward Domain-Specific Solvers for Distributed Consistency}},
  booktitle =	{3rd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2019)},
  pages =	{10:1--10:14},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-113-9},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{136},
  editor =	{Lerner, Benjamin S. and Bod{\'\i}k, Rastislav and Krishnamurthi, Shriram},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2019.10},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-105530},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2019.10},
  annote =	{Keywords: distributed consistency, SMT solving, theory solvers}
}
Document
Version Control Is for Your Data Too

Authors: Gowtham Kaki, KC Sivaramakrishnan, and Suresh Jagannathan

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 136, 3rd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2019)


Abstract
Programmers regularly use distributed version control systems (DVCS) such as Git to facilitate collaborative software development. The primary purpose of a DVCS is to maintain integrity of source code in the presence of concurrent, possibly conflicting edits from collaborators. In addition to safely merging concurrent non-conflicting edits, a DVCS extensively tracks source code provenance to help programmers contextualize and resolve conflicts. Provenance also facilitates debugging by letting programmers see diffs between versions and quickly find those edits that introduced the offending conflict (e.g., via git blame). In this paper, we posit that analogous workflows to collaborative software development also arise in distributed software execution; we argue that the characteristics that make a DVCS an ideal fit for the former also make it an ideal fit for the latter. Building on this observation, we propose a distributed programming model, called carmot that views distributed shared state as an entity evolving in time, manifested as a sequence of persistent versions, and relies on an explicitly defined merge semantics to reconcile concurrent conflicting versions. We show examples demonstrating how carmot simplifies distributed programming, while also enabling novel workflows integral to modern applications such as blockchains. We also describe a prototype implementation of carmot that we use to evaluate its practicality.

Cite as

Gowtham Kaki, KC Sivaramakrishnan, and Suresh Jagannathan. Version Control Is for Your Data Too. In 3rd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 136, pp. 8:1-8:18, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{kaki_et_al:LIPIcs.SNAPL.2019.8,
  author =	{Kaki, Gowtham and Sivaramakrishnan, KC and Jagannathan, Suresh},
  title =	{{Version Control Is for Your Data Too}},
  booktitle =	{3rd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2019)},
  pages =	{8:1--8:18},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-113-9},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{136},
  editor =	{Lerner, Benjamin S. and Bod{\'\i}k, Rastislav and Krishnamurthi, Shriram},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2019.8},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-105516},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2019.8},
  annote =	{Keywords: replication, distributed systems, version control}
}
Document
A Tour of Gallifrey, a Language for Geodistributed Programming

Authors: Mae Milano, Rolph Recto, Tom Magrino, and Andrew C. Myers

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 136, 3rd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2019)


Abstract
Programming efficient distributed, concurrent systems requires new abstractions that go beyond traditional sequential programming. But programmers already have trouble getting sequential code right, so simplicity is essential. The core problem is that low-latency, high-availability access to data requires replication of mutable state. Keeping replicas fully consistent is expensive, so the question is how to expose asynchronously replicated objects to programmers in a way that allows them to reason simply about their code. We propose an answer to this question in our ongoing work designing a new language, Gallifrey, which provides orthogonal replication through _restrictions_ with _merge strategies_, _contingencies_ for conflicts arising from concurrency, and _branches_, a novel concurrency control construct inspired by version control, to contain provisional behavior.

Cite as

Mae Milano, Rolph Recto, Tom Magrino, and Andrew C. Myers. A Tour of Gallifrey, a Language for Geodistributed Programming. In 3rd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 136, pp. 11:1-11:19, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{milano_et_al:LIPIcs.SNAPL.2019.11,
  author =	{Milano, Mae and Recto, Rolph and Magrino, Tom and Myers, Andrew C.},
  title =	{{A Tour of Gallifrey, a Language for Geodistributed Programming}},
  booktitle =	{3rd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2019)},
  pages =	{11:1--11:19},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-113-9},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{136},
  editor =	{Lerner, Benjamin S. and Bod{\'\i}k, Rastislav and Krishnamurthi, Shriram},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2019.11},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-105549},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2019.11},
  annote =	{Keywords: programming languages, distributed systems, weak consistency, linear types}
}
Document
Multitier Modules

Authors: Pascal Weisenburger and Guido Salvaneschi

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 134, 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)


Abstract
Multitier programming languages address the complexity of developing distributed systems abstracting over low level implementation details such as data representation, serialization and network protocols. Since the functionalities of different peers can be defined in the same compilation unit, multitier languages do not force developers to modularize software along network boundaries. Unfortunately, combining the code for all tiers into the same compilation unit poses a scalability challenge or forces developers to resort to traditional modularization abstractions that are agnostic to the multitier nature of the language. In this paper, we address this issue with a module system for multitier languages. Our module system supports encapsulating each (cross-peer) functionality and defining it over abstract peer types. As a result, we disentangle modularization and distribution and we enable the definition of a distributed system as a composition of multitier modules, each representing a subsystem. Our case studies on distributed algorithms, distributed data structures, as well as on the Apache Flink task distribution system, show that multitier modules allow the definition of reusable (abstract) patterns of interaction in distributed software and enable separating the modularization and distribution concerns, properly separating functionalities in distributed systems.

Cite as

Pascal Weisenburger and Guido Salvaneschi. Multitier Modules. In 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 134, pp. 3:1-3:29, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{weisenburger_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.3,
  author =	{Weisenburger, Pascal and Salvaneschi, Guido},
  title =	{{Multitier Modules}},
  booktitle =	{33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)},
  pages =	{3:1--3:29},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-111-5},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{134},
  editor =	{Donaldson, Alastair F.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.3},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-107957},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.3},
  annote =	{Keywords: Distributed Programming, Multitier Programming, Abstract Peer Types, Placement Types, Module Systems, Scala}
}
Document
Reliable State Machines: A Framework for Programming Reliable Cloud Services

Authors: Suvam Mukherjee, Nitin John Raj, Krishnan Govindraj, Pantazis Deligiannis, Chandramouleswaran Ravichandran, Akash Lal, Aseem Rastogi, and Raja Krishnaswamy

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 134, 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)


Abstract
Building reliable applications for the cloud is challenging because of unpredictable failures during a program’s execution. This paper presents a programming framework, called Reliable State Machines (RSMs), that offers fault-tolerance by construction. In our framework, an application comprises several (possibly distributed) RSMs that communicate with each other via messages, much in the style of actor-based programming. Each RSM is fault-tolerant by design, thereby offering the illusion of being "always-alive". An RSM is guaranteed to process each input request exactly once, as one would expect in a failure-free environment. The RSM runtime automatically takes care of persisting state and rehydrating it on a failover. We present the core syntax and semantics of RSMs, along with a formal proof of failure-transparency. We provide a .NET implementation of the RSM framework for deploying services to Microsoft Azure. We carry out an extensive performance evaluation on micro-benchmarks to show that one can build high-throughput applications with RSMs. We also present a case study where we rewrite a significant part of a production cloud service using RSMs. The resulting service has simpler code and exhibits production-grade performance.

Cite as

Suvam Mukherjee, Nitin John Raj, Krishnan Govindraj, Pantazis Deligiannis, Chandramouleswaran Ravichandran, Akash Lal, Aseem Rastogi, and Raja Krishnaswamy. Reliable State Machines: A Framework for Programming Reliable Cloud Services. In 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 134, pp. 18:1-18:29, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{mukherjee_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.18,
  author =	{Mukherjee, Suvam and Raj, Nitin John and Govindraj, Krishnan and Deligiannis, Pantazis and Ravichandran, Chandramouleswaran and Lal, Akash and Rastogi, Aseem and Krishnaswamy, Raja},
  title =	{{Reliable State Machines: A Framework for Programming Reliable Cloud Services}},
  booktitle =	{33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)},
  pages =	{18:1--18:29},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-111-5},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{134},
  editor =	{Donaldson, Alastair F.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.18},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-108101},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.18},
  annote =	{Keywords: Fault tolerance, Cloud computing, Actor framework}
}
Document
Non-Uniform Replication

Authors: Gonçalo Cabrita and Nuno Preguiça

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 95, 21st International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2017)


Abstract
Replication is a key technique in the design of efficient and reliable distributed systems. As information grows, it becomes difficult or even impossible to store all information at every replica. A common approach to deal with this problem is to rely on partial replication, where each replica maintains only a part of the total system information. As a consequence, a remote replica might need to be contacted for computing the reply to some given query, which leads to high latency costs particularly in geo-replicated settings. In this work, we introduce the concept of non- uniform replication, where each replica stores only part of the information, but where all replicas store enough information to answer every query. We apply this concept to eventual consistency and conflict-free replicated data types. We show that this model can address useful problems and present two data types that solve such problems. Our evaluation shows that non-uniform replication is more efficient than traditional replication, using less storage space and network bandwidth.

Cite as

Gonçalo Cabrita and Nuno Preguiça. Non-Uniform Replication. In 21st International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2017). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 95, pp. 24:1-24:19, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@InProceedings{cabrita_et_al:LIPIcs.OPODIS.2017.24,
  author =	{Cabrita, Gon\c{c}alo and Pregui\c{c}a, Nuno},
  title =	{{Non-Uniform Replication}},
  booktitle =	{21st International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2017)},
  pages =	{24:1--24:19},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-061-3},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{95},
  editor =	{Aspnes, James and Bessani, Alysson and Felber, Pascal and Leit\~{a}o, Jo\~{a}o},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.OPODIS.2017.24},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-86393},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.OPODIS.2017.24},
  annote =	{Keywords: Non-uniform Replication, Partial Replication, Replicated Data Types, Eventual Consistency}
}
Document
A Framework for Transactional Consistency Models with Atomic Visibility

Authors: Andrea Cerone, Giovanni Bernardi, and Alexey Gotsman

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 42, 26th International Conference on Concurrency Theory (CONCUR 2015)


Abstract
Modern distributed systems often rely on databases that achieve scalability by providing only weak guarantees about the consistency of distributed transaction processing. The semantics of programs interacting with such a database depends on its consistency model, defining these guarantees. Unfortunately, consistency models are usually stated informally or using disparate formalisms, often tied to the database internals. To deal with this problem, we propose a framework for specifying a variety of consistency models for transactions uniformly and declaratively. Our specifications are given in the style of weak memory models, using structures of events and relations on them. The specifications are particularly concise because they exploit the property of atomic visibility guaranteed by many consistency models: either all or none of the updates by a transaction can be visible to another one. This allows the specifications to abstract from individual events inside transactions. We illustrate the use of our framework by specifying several existing consistency models. To validate our specifications, we prove that they are equivalent to alternative operational ones, given as algorithms closer to actual implementations. Our work provides a rigorous foundation for developing the metatheory of the novel form of concurrency arising in weakly consistent large-scale databases.

Cite as

Andrea Cerone, Giovanni Bernardi, and Alexey Gotsman. A Framework for Transactional Consistency Models with Atomic Visibility. In 26th International Conference on Concurrency Theory (CONCUR 2015). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 42, pp. 58-71, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2015)


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@InProceedings{cerone_et_al:LIPIcs.CONCUR.2015.58,
  author =	{Cerone, Andrea and Bernardi, Giovanni and Gotsman, Alexey},
  title =	{{A Framework for Transactional Consistency Models with Atomic Visibility}},
  booktitle =	{26th International Conference on Concurrency Theory (CONCUR 2015)},
  pages =	{58--71},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-91-0},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2015},
  volume =	{42},
  editor =	{Aceto, Luca and de Frutos Escrig, David},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.CONCUR.2015.58},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-53756},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.CONCUR.2015.58},
  annote =	{Keywords: Replication, Consistency models, Transactions}
}
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