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Using Lock Servers to Scale Real-Time Locking Protocols: Chasing Ever-Increasing Core Counts (Artifact)

Authors Catherine E. Nemitz, Tanya Amert, James H. Anderson



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DARTS.4.2.2.pdf
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  • 3 pages

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Catherine E. Nemitz
Tanya Amert
James H. Anderson

Cite AsGet BibTex

Catherine E. Nemitz, Tanya Amert, and James H. Anderson. Using Lock Servers to Scale Real-Time Locking Protocols: Chasing Ever-Increasing Core Counts (Artifact). In Special Issue of the 30th Euromicro Conference on Real-Time Systems (ECRTS 2018). Dagstuhl Artifacts Series (DARTS), Volume 4, Issue 2, pp. 2:1-2:3, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)
https://doi.org/10.4230/DARTS.4.2.2

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Abstract

During the past decade, parallelism-related issues have been at the forefront of real-time systems research due to the advent of multicore technologies. In the coming years, such issues will loom ever larger due to increasing core counts. Having more cores means a greater potential exists for platform capacity loss when the available parallelism cannot be fully exploited. In this work, such capacity loss is considered in the context of real-time locking protocols. In this context, lock nesting becomes a key concern as it can result in transitive blocking chains that force tasks to execute sequentially unnecessarily. Such chains can be quite long on a larger machine. Contention-sensitive real-time locking protocols have been proposed as a means of ``breaking'' transitive blocking chains, but such protocols tend to have high overhead due to more complicated lock/unlock logic. To ease such overhead, the usage of lock servers is considered herein. In particular, four specific lock-server paradigms are proposed and many nuances concerning their deployment are explored. Experiments are presented that show that, by executing cache hot, lock servers can enable reductions in lock/unlock overhead of up to 86\%. Such reductions make contention-sensitive protocols a viable approach in practice. This artifact contains the implementation of two contention-sensitive locking protocol variants implemented with four proposed lock-server paradigms, as well as the experiments with which they were evaluated.
Keywords
  • multiprocess locking protocols
  • nested locks
  • priority-inversion blocking
  • reader/writer locks
  • real-time locking protocols

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References

  1. J. Mellor-Crummey and M. Scott. Algorithms for scalable synchronization of shared-memory multiprocessors. Transactions on Computer Systems, 9(1), 1991. Google Scholar
  2. C. Nemitz, T. Amert, and J. Anderson. Using lock servers to scale real-time locking protocols: Chasing ever-increasing core counts. In ECRTS 2108. Google Scholar
  3. C. Nemitz, T. Amert, and J. Anderson. Using lock servers to scale real-time locking protocols: Chasing ever-increasing core counts (extended version), 2018. URL: http://www.cs.unc.edu/˜anderson/papers.html.
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