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Documents authored by Combemale, Benoit


Found 2 Possible Name Variants:

Combemale, Benoit

Document
Model-Driven Engineering of Digital Twins (Dagstuhl Seminar 22362)

Authors: Loek Cleophas, Thomas Godfrey, Djamel Eddine Khelladi, Daniel Lehner, Benoit Combemale, Bernhard Rumpe, and Steffen Zschaler

Published in: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 12, Issue 9 (2023)


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 22362 "Model-Driven Engineering of Digital Twins". Digital twins are an emerging concept with the potential for revolutionising the way we interact with the physical world. Digital twins can be used for improved analysis and understanding of complex systems as well as for control and transformation of these systems. Digital twins are themselves complex software systems, posing novel software-engineering challenges, which have so far not been sufficiently addressed by the software-engineering research community. The seminar aimed as a key outcome to contribute to a solid research roadmap for the new Software Engineering subdiscipline of Model-Based Development of Digital Twins. This paper is an intermediate result, which is thought to be further discussed in the research community that has also been built using this seminar.

Cite as

Loek Cleophas, Thomas Godfrey, Djamel Eddine Khelladi, Daniel Lehner, Benoit Combemale, Bernhard Rumpe, and Steffen Zschaler. Model-Driven Engineering of Digital Twins (Dagstuhl Seminar 22362). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 12, Issue 9, pp. 20-40, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2023)


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@Article{cleophas_et_al:DagRep.12.9.20,
  author =	{Cleophas, Loek and Godfrey, Thomas and Khelladi, Djamel Eddine and Lehner, Daniel and Combemale, Benoit and Rumpe, Bernhard and Zschaler, Steffen},
  title =	{{Model-Driven Engineering of Digital Twins (Dagstuhl Seminar 22362)}},
  pages =	{20--40},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2023},
  volume =	{12},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{Combemale, Benoit and Rumpe, Bernhard and Zschaler, Steffen},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.12.9.20},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-178080},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.12.9.20},
  annote =	{Keywords: Software Engineering, Model-Driven Engineering, Digital Twins, Model Management, Data Management, Models@runtime}
}
Document
SLEBOK: The Software Language Engineering Body of Knowledge (Dagstuhl Seminar 17342)

Authors: Benoît Combemale, Ralf Lämmel, and Eric Van Wyk

Published in: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 8 (2018)


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 17342 "SLEBOK: The Software Language Engineering Body of Knowledge". Software Language Engineering (SLE) has emerged as a scientific field, with a strong motivation to connect and integrate different research disciplines such as compiler construction, reverse engineering, software transformation, model-driven engineering, and ontologies. This seminar supported further integration of said communities with the clear objective of assembling a Body of Knowledge on SLE (SLEBoK). The BoK features artifacts, definitions, methods, techniques, best practices, open challenges, case studies, teaching material, and other components that will afterwards help students, researchers, teachers, and practitioners to learn from, to better leverage, to better contribute to, and to better disseminate the intellectual contributions and practical tools and techniques coming from the SLE field.

Cite as

Benoît Combemale, Ralf Lämmel, and Eric Van Wyk. SLEBOK: The Software Language Engineering Body of Knowledge (Dagstuhl Seminar 17342). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 8, pp. 45-54, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{combemale_et_al:DagRep.7.8.45,
  author =	{Combemale, Beno\^{i}t and L\"{a}mmel, Ralf and Van Wyk, Eric},
  title =	{{SLEBOK: The Software Language Engineering Body of Knowledge (Dagstuhl Seminar 17342)}},
  pages =	{45--54},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{8},
  editor =	{Combemale, Beno\^{i}t and L\"{a}mmel, Ralf and Van Wyk, Eric},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.8.45},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-84296},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.8.45},
  annote =	{Keywords: body of knowledge, language design and implementation, metaprogramming, software languages}
}
Document
Engineering Academic Software (Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop 16252)

Authors: Alice Allen, Cecilia Aragon, Christoph Becker, Jeffrey Carver, Andrei Chis, Benoit Combemale, Mike Croucher, Kevin Crowston, Daniel Garijo, Ashish Gehani, Carole Goble, Robert Haines, Robert Hirschfeld, James Howison, Kathryn Huff, Caroline Jay, Daniel S. Katz, Claude Kirchner, Katie Kuksenok, Ralf Lämmel, Oscar Nierstrasz, Matt Turk, Rob van Nieuwpoort, Matthew Vaughn, and Jurgen J. Vinju

Published in: Dagstuhl Manifestos, Volume 6, Issue 1 (2017)


Abstract
Software is often a critical component of scientific research. It can be a component of the academic research methods used to produce research results, or it may itself be an academic research result. Software, however, has rarely been considered to be a citable artifact in its own right. With the advent of open-source software, artifact evaluation committees of conferences, and journals that include source code and running systems as part of the published artifacts, we foresee that software will increasingly be recognized as part of the academic process. The quality and sustainability of this software must be accounted for, both a prioro and a posteriori. The Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop on "Engineering Academic Software" has examined the strengths, weaknesses, risks, and opportunities of academic software engineering. A key outcome of the workshop is this Dagstuhl Manifesto, serving as a roadmap towards future professional software engineering for software-based research instruments and other software produced and used in an academic context. The manifesto is expressed in terms of a series of actionable "pledges" that users and developers of academic research software can take as concrete steps towards improving the environment in which that software is produced.

Cite as

Alice Allen, Cecilia Aragon, Christoph Becker, Jeffrey Carver, Andrei Chis, Benoit Combemale, Mike Croucher, Kevin Crowston, Daniel Garijo, Ashish Gehani, Carole Goble, Robert Haines, Robert Hirschfeld, James Howison, Kathryn Huff, Caroline Jay, Daniel S. Katz, Claude Kirchner, Katie Kuksenok, Ralf Lämmel, Oscar Nierstrasz, Matt Turk, Rob van Nieuwpoort, Matthew Vaughn, and Jurgen J. Vinju. Engineering Academic Software (Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop 16252). In Dagstuhl Manifestos, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp. 1-20, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@Article{allen_et_al:DagMan.6.1.1,
  author =	{Allen, Alice and Aragon, Cecilia and Becker, Christoph and Carver, Jeffrey and Chis, Andrei and Combemale, Benoit and Croucher, Mike and Crowston, Kevin and Garijo, Daniel and Gehani, Ashish and Goble, Carole and Haines, Robert and Hirschfeld, Robert and Howison, James and Huff, Kathryn and Jay, Caroline and Katz, Daniel S. and Kirchner, Claude and Kuksenok, Katie and L\"{a}mmel, Ralf and Nierstrasz, Oscar and Turk, Matt and van Nieuwpoort, Rob and Vaughn, Matthew and Vinju, Jurgen J.},
  title =	{{Engineering Academic Software (Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop 16252)}},
  pages =	{1--20},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Manifestos},
  ISSN =	{2193-2433},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{6},
  number =	{1},
  editor =	{Allen, Alice and Aragon, Cecilia and Becker, Christoph and Carver, Jeffrey and Chis, Andrei and Combemale, Benoit and Croucher, Mike and Crowston, Kevin and Garijo, Daniel and Gehani, Ashish and Goble, Carole and Haines, Robert and Hirschfeld, Robert and Howison, James and Huff, Kathryn and Jay, Caroline and Katz, Daniel S. and Kirchner, Claude and Kuksenok, Katie and L\"{a}mmel, Ralf and Nierstrasz, Oscar and Turk, Matt and van Nieuwpoort, Rob and Vaughn, Matthew and Vinju, Jurgen J.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagMan.6.1.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-71468},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagMan.6.1.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: Academic software, Research software, Software citation, Software sustainability}
}
Document
Globalizing Domain-Specific Languages (Dagstuhl Seminar 14412)

Authors: Betty H. C. Cheng, Benoit Combemale, Robert B. France, Jean-Marc Jézéquel, and Bernhard Rumpe

Published in: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 10 (2015)


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of the Dagstuhl Seminar 14412 "Globalizing Domain-Specific Languages" held in October 2014. Complex, data-intensive, cyper-physical, cloud-based etc. systems need effective modeling techniques, preferably based on DSLs to describe aspects and views. Models written in heterogeneous languages however need to be semantically compatible and their supporting individual tools need to be interoperable. This workshop discusses possible and necessary forms of interoperation their benefits and drawbacks and in particular whether there is a general pattern on coordination, composition and interoperation possible. Main goal was to establish a research programme towards such techniques.

Cite as

Betty H. C. Cheng, Benoit Combemale, Robert B. France, Jean-Marc Jézéquel, and Bernhard Rumpe. Globalizing Domain-Specific Languages (Dagstuhl Seminar 14412). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 10, pp. 32-50, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2015)


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@Article{cheng_et_al:DagRep.4.10.32,
  author =	{Cheng, Betty H. C. and Combemale, Benoit and France, Robert B. and J\'{e}z\'{e}quel, Jean-Marc and Rumpe, Bernhard},
  title =	{{Globalizing Domain-Specific Languages (Dagstuhl Seminar 14412)}},
  pages =	{32--50},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2015},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{10},
  editor =	{Cheng, Betty H. C. and Combemale, Benoit and France, Robert B. and J\'{e}z\'{e}quel, Jean-Marc and Rumpe, Bernhard},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.10.32},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-48913},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.10.32},
  annote =	{Keywords: Modelling, Domain Specific Language, Software, Coordination, Globalization, Heterogeneous Complex Systems, DSL, UML, Composition}
}

Combemale, Benoît

Document
Model-Driven Engineering of Digital Twins (Dagstuhl Seminar 22362)

Authors: Loek Cleophas, Thomas Godfrey, Djamel Eddine Khelladi, Daniel Lehner, Benoit Combemale, Bernhard Rumpe, and Steffen Zschaler

Published in: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 12, Issue 9 (2023)


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 22362 "Model-Driven Engineering of Digital Twins". Digital twins are an emerging concept with the potential for revolutionising the way we interact with the physical world. Digital twins can be used for improved analysis and understanding of complex systems as well as for control and transformation of these systems. Digital twins are themselves complex software systems, posing novel software-engineering challenges, which have so far not been sufficiently addressed by the software-engineering research community. The seminar aimed as a key outcome to contribute to a solid research roadmap for the new Software Engineering subdiscipline of Model-Based Development of Digital Twins. This paper is an intermediate result, which is thought to be further discussed in the research community that has also been built using this seminar.

Cite as

Loek Cleophas, Thomas Godfrey, Djamel Eddine Khelladi, Daniel Lehner, Benoit Combemale, Bernhard Rumpe, and Steffen Zschaler. Model-Driven Engineering of Digital Twins (Dagstuhl Seminar 22362). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 12, Issue 9, pp. 20-40, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2023)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@Article{cleophas_et_al:DagRep.12.9.20,
  author =	{Cleophas, Loek and Godfrey, Thomas and Khelladi, Djamel Eddine and Lehner, Daniel and Combemale, Benoit and Rumpe, Bernhard and Zschaler, Steffen},
  title =	{{Model-Driven Engineering of Digital Twins (Dagstuhl Seminar 22362)}},
  pages =	{20--40},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2023},
  volume =	{12},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{Combemale, Benoit and Rumpe, Bernhard and Zschaler, Steffen},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.12.9.20},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-178080},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.12.9.20},
  annote =	{Keywords: Software Engineering, Model-Driven Engineering, Digital Twins, Model Management, Data Management, Models@runtime}
}
Document
SLEBOK: The Software Language Engineering Body of Knowledge (Dagstuhl Seminar 17342)

Authors: Benoît Combemale, Ralf Lämmel, and Eric Van Wyk

Published in: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 8 (2018)


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 17342 "SLEBOK: The Software Language Engineering Body of Knowledge". Software Language Engineering (SLE) has emerged as a scientific field, with a strong motivation to connect and integrate different research disciplines such as compiler construction, reverse engineering, software transformation, model-driven engineering, and ontologies. This seminar supported further integration of said communities with the clear objective of assembling a Body of Knowledge on SLE (SLEBoK). The BoK features artifacts, definitions, methods, techniques, best practices, open challenges, case studies, teaching material, and other components that will afterwards help students, researchers, teachers, and practitioners to learn from, to better leverage, to better contribute to, and to better disseminate the intellectual contributions and practical tools and techniques coming from the SLE field.

Cite as

Benoît Combemale, Ralf Lämmel, and Eric Van Wyk. SLEBOK: The Software Language Engineering Body of Knowledge (Dagstuhl Seminar 17342). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 8, pp. 45-54, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@Article{combemale_et_al:DagRep.7.8.45,
  author =	{Combemale, Beno\^{i}t and L\"{a}mmel, Ralf and Van Wyk, Eric},
  title =	{{SLEBOK: The Software Language Engineering Body of Knowledge (Dagstuhl Seminar 17342)}},
  pages =	{45--54},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{8},
  editor =	{Combemale, Beno\^{i}t and L\"{a}mmel, Ralf and Van Wyk, Eric},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.8.45},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-84296},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.8.45},
  annote =	{Keywords: body of knowledge, language design and implementation, metaprogramming, software languages}
}
Document
Engineering Academic Software (Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop 16252)

Authors: Alice Allen, Cecilia Aragon, Christoph Becker, Jeffrey Carver, Andrei Chis, Benoit Combemale, Mike Croucher, Kevin Crowston, Daniel Garijo, Ashish Gehani, Carole Goble, Robert Haines, Robert Hirschfeld, James Howison, Kathryn Huff, Caroline Jay, Daniel S. Katz, Claude Kirchner, Katie Kuksenok, Ralf Lämmel, Oscar Nierstrasz, Matt Turk, Rob van Nieuwpoort, Matthew Vaughn, and Jurgen J. Vinju

Published in: Dagstuhl Manifestos, Volume 6, Issue 1 (2017)


Abstract
Software is often a critical component of scientific research. It can be a component of the academic research methods used to produce research results, or it may itself be an academic research result. Software, however, has rarely been considered to be a citable artifact in its own right. With the advent of open-source software, artifact evaluation committees of conferences, and journals that include source code and running systems as part of the published artifacts, we foresee that software will increasingly be recognized as part of the academic process. The quality and sustainability of this software must be accounted for, both a prioro and a posteriori. The Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop on "Engineering Academic Software" has examined the strengths, weaknesses, risks, and opportunities of academic software engineering. A key outcome of the workshop is this Dagstuhl Manifesto, serving as a roadmap towards future professional software engineering for software-based research instruments and other software produced and used in an academic context. The manifesto is expressed in terms of a series of actionable "pledges" that users and developers of academic research software can take as concrete steps towards improving the environment in which that software is produced.

Cite as

Alice Allen, Cecilia Aragon, Christoph Becker, Jeffrey Carver, Andrei Chis, Benoit Combemale, Mike Croucher, Kevin Crowston, Daniel Garijo, Ashish Gehani, Carole Goble, Robert Haines, Robert Hirschfeld, James Howison, Kathryn Huff, Caroline Jay, Daniel S. Katz, Claude Kirchner, Katie Kuksenok, Ralf Lämmel, Oscar Nierstrasz, Matt Turk, Rob van Nieuwpoort, Matthew Vaughn, and Jurgen J. Vinju. Engineering Academic Software (Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop 16252). In Dagstuhl Manifestos, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp. 1-20, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@Article{allen_et_al:DagMan.6.1.1,
  author =	{Allen, Alice and Aragon, Cecilia and Becker, Christoph and Carver, Jeffrey and Chis, Andrei and Combemale, Benoit and Croucher, Mike and Crowston, Kevin and Garijo, Daniel and Gehani, Ashish and Goble, Carole and Haines, Robert and Hirschfeld, Robert and Howison, James and Huff, Kathryn and Jay, Caroline and Katz, Daniel S. and Kirchner, Claude and Kuksenok, Katie and L\"{a}mmel, Ralf and Nierstrasz, Oscar and Turk, Matt and van Nieuwpoort, Rob and Vaughn, Matthew and Vinju, Jurgen J.},
  title =	{{Engineering Academic Software (Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop 16252)}},
  pages =	{1--20},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Manifestos},
  ISSN =	{2193-2433},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{6},
  number =	{1},
  editor =	{Allen, Alice and Aragon, Cecilia and Becker, Christoph and Carver, Jeffrey and Chis, Andrei and Combemale, Benoit and Croucher, Mike and Crowston, Kevin and Garijo, Daniel and Gehani, Ashish and Goble, Carole and Haines, Robert and Hirschfeld, Robert and Howison, James and Huff, Kathryn and Jay, Caroline and Katz, Daniel S. and Kirchner, Claude and Kuksenok, Katie and L\"{a}mmel, Ralf and Nierstrasz, Oscar and Turk, Matt and van Nieuwpoort, Rob and Vaughn, Matthew and Vinju, Jurgen J.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagMan.6.1.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-71468},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagMan.6.1.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: Academic software, Research software, Software citation, Software sustainability}
}
Document
Globalizing Domain-Specific Languages (Dagstuhl Seminar 14412)

Authors: Betty H. C. Cheng, Benoit Combemale, Robert B. France, Jean-Marc Jézéquel, and Bernhard Rumpe

Published in: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 10 (2015)


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of the Dagstuhl Seminar 14412 "Globalizing Domain-Specific Languages" held in October 2014. Complex, data-intensive, cyper-physical, cloud-based etc. systems need effective modeling techniques, preferably based on DSLs to describe aspects and views. Models written in heterogeneous languages however need to be semantically compatible and their supporting individual tools need to be interoperable. This workshop discusses possible and necessary forms of interoperation their benefits and drawbacks and in particular whether there is a general pattern on coordination, composition and interoperation possible. Main goal was to establish a research programme towards such techniques.

Cite as

Betty H. C. Cheng, Benoit Combemale, Robert B. France, Jean-Marc Jézéquel, and Bernhard Rumpe. Globalizing Domain-Specific Languages (Dagstuhl Seminar 14412). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 10, pp. 32-50, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2015)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@Article{cheng_et_al:DagRep.4.10.32,
  author =	{Cheng, Betty H. C. and Combemale, Benoit and France, Robert B. and J\'{e}z\'{e}quel, Jean-Marc and Rumpe, Bernhard},
  title =	{{Globalizing Domain-Specific Languages (Dagstuhl Seminar 14412)}},
  pages =	{32--50},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2015},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{10},
  editor =	{Cheng, Betty H. C. and Combemale, Benoit and France, Robert B. and J\'{e}z\'{e}quel, Jean-Marc and Rumpe, Bernhard},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.10.32},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-48913},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.10.32},
  annote =	{Keywords: Modelling, Domain Specific Language, Software, Coordination, Globalization, Heterogeneous Complex Systems, DSL, UML, Composition}
}
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