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Documents authored by Zhang, Hongyu


Document
Platial k-Anonymity: Improving Location Anonymity Through Temporal Popularity Signatures

Authors: Grant McKenzie and Hongyu Zhang

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 277, 12th International Conference on Geographic Information Science (GIScience 2023)


Abstract
While it is increasingly necessary in today’s digital society, sharing personal location information comes at a cost. Sharing one’s precise place of interest, e.g., Compass Coffee, enables a range of location-based services, but substantially reduces the individual’s privacy. Methods have been developed to obfuscate and anonymize location data while still maintaining a degree of utility. One such approach, spatial k-anonymity, aims to ensure an individual’s level of anonymity by reporting their location as a set of k potential locations rather than their actual location alone. Larger values of k increase spatial anonymity while decreasing the utility of the location information. Typical examples of spatial k-anonymized datasets present elements as simple geographic points with no attributes or contextual information. In this work, we demonstrate that the addition of publicly available contextual data can significantly reduce the anonymity of a k-anonymized dataset. Through the analysis of place type temporal visitation patterns, hours of operation, and popularity values, one’s anonymity can be decreased by more than 50 percent. We propose a platial k-anonymity approach that leverages a combination of temporal popularity signatures and reports the amount that k must increase in order to maintain a certain level of anonymity. Finally, a method for reporting platial k-anonymous regions is presented and the implications of our methods are discussed.

Cite as

Grant McKenzie and Hongyu Zhang. Platial k-Anonymity: Improving Location Anonymity Through Temporal Popularity Signatures. In 12th International Conference on Geographic Information Science (GIScience 2023). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 277, pp. 9:1-9:15, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2023)


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@InProceedings{mckenzie_et_al:LIPIcs.GIScience.2023.9,
  author =	{McKenzie, Grant and Zhang, Hongyu},
  title =	{{Platial k-Anonymity: Improving Location Anonymity Through Temporal Popularity Signatures}},
  booktitle =	{12th International Conference on Geographic Information Science (GIScience 2023)},
  pages =	{9:1--9:15},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-288-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2023},
  volume =	{277},
  editor =	{Beecham, Roger and Long, Jed A. and Smith, Dianna and Zhao, Qunshan and Wise, Sarah},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops-dev.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.GIScience.2023.9},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-189045},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.GIScience.2023.9},
  annote =	{Keywords: location anonymity, location privacy, geoprivacy, place, temporal, geosocial}
}
Document
Do Bugs Propagate? An Empirical Analysis of Temporal Correlations Among Software Bugs

Authors: Xiaodong Gu, Yo-Sub Han, Sunghun Kim, and Hongyu Zhang

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 194, 35th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2021)


Abstract
The occurrences of bugs are not isolated events, rather they may interact, affect each other, and trigger other latent bugs. Identifying and understanding bug correlations could help developers localize bug origins, predict potential bugs, and design better architectures of software artifacts to prevent bug affection. Many studies in the defect prediction and fault localization literature implied the dependence and interactions between multiple bugs, but few of them explicitly investigate the correlations of bugs across time steps and how bugs affect each other. In this paper, we perform social network analysis on the temporal correlations between bugs across time steps on software artifact ties, i.e., software graphs. Adopted from the correlation analysis methodology in social networks, we construct software graphs of three artifact ties such as function calls and type hierarchy and then perform longitudinal logistic regressions of time-lag bug correlations on these graphs. Our experiments on four open-source projects suggest that bugs can propagate as observed on certain artifact tie graphs. Based on our findings, we propose a hybrid artifact tie graph, a synthesis of a few well-known software graphs, that exhibits a higher degree of bug propagation. Our findings shed light on research for better bug prediction and localization models and help developers to perform maintenance actions to prevent consequential bugs.

Cite as

Xiaodong Gu, Yo-Sub Han, Sunghun Kim, and Hongyu Zhang. Do Bugs Propagate? An Empirical Analysis of Temporal Correlations Among Software Bugs. In 35th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2021). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 194, pp. 11:1-11:21, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2021)


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@InProceedings{gu_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2021.11,
  author =	{Gu, Xiaodong and Han, Yo-Sub and Kim, Sunghun and Zhang, Hongyu},
  title =	{{Do Bugs Propagate? An Empirical Analysis of Temporal Correlations Among Software Bugs}},
  booktitle =	{35th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2021)},
  pages =	{11:1--11:21},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-190-0},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2021},
  volume =	{194},
  editor =	{M{\o}ller, Anders and Sridharan, Manu},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops-dev.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2021.11},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-140540},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2021.11},
  annote =	{Keywords: empirical software engineering, bug propagation, software graph, bug correlation}
}
Document
Testing and Verification of Compilers (Dagstuhl Seminar 17502)

Authors: Junjie Chen, Alastair F. Donaldson, Andreas Zeller, and Hongyu Zhang

Published in: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 12 (2018)


Abstract
This report documents the Dagstuhl Seminar 17502 "Testing and Verification of Compilers" that took place during December 10 to 13, 2017, which we provide as a resource for researchers who are interested in understanding the state of the art and open problems in this field, and applying them to this and other areas.

Cite as

Junjie Chen, Alastair F. Donaldson, Andreas Zeller, and Hongyu Zhang. Testing and Verification of Compilers (Dagstuhl Seminar 17502). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 12, pp. 50-65, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{chen_et_al:DagRep.7.12.50,
  author =	{Chen, Junjie and Donaldson, Alastair F. and Zeller, Andreas and Zhang, Hongyu},
  title =	{{Testing and Verification of Compilers (Dagstuhl Seminar 17502)}},
  pages =	{50--65},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{12},
  editor =	{Chen, Junjie and Donaldson, Alastair F. and Zeller, Andreas and Zhang, Hongyu},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops-dev.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.12.50},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-86763},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.12.50},
  annote =	{Keywords: code generation, compiler testing, compiler verification, program analysis, program optimization}
}
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