4 Search Results for "Bizer, Christian"


Document
Position
Grounding Stream Reasoning Research

Authors: Pieter Bonte, Jean-Paul Calbimonte, Daniel de Leng, Daniele Dell'Aglio, Emanuele Della Valle, Thomas Eiter, Federico Giannini, Fredrik Heintz, Konstantin Schekotihin, Danh Le-Phuoc, Alessandra Mileo, Patrik Schneider, Riccardo Tommasini, Jacopo Urbani, and Giacomo Ziffer

Published in: TGDK, Volume 2, Issue 1 (2024): Special Issue on Trends in Graph Data and Knowledge - Part 2. Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge, Volume 2, Issue 1


Abstract
In the last decade, there has been a growing interest in applying AI technologies to implement complex data analytics over data streams. To this end, researchers in various fields have been organising a yearly event called the "Stream Reasoning Workshop" to share perspectives, challenges, and experiences around this topic. In this paper, the previous organisers of the workshops and other community members provide a summary of the main research results that have been discussed during the first six editions of the event. These results can be categorised into four main research areas: The first is concerned with the technological challenges related to handling large data streams. The second area aims at adapting and extending existing semantic technologies to data streams. The third and fourth areas focus on how to implement reasoning techniques, either considering deductive or inductive techniques, to extract new and valuable knowledge from the data in the stream. This summary is written not only to provide a crystallisation of the field, but also to point out distinctive traits of the stream reasoning community. Moreover, it also provides a foundation for future research by enumerating a list of use cases and open challenges, to stimulate others to join this exciting research area.

Cite as

Pieter Bonte, Jean-Paul Calbimonte, Daniel de Leng, Daniele Dell'Aglio, Emanuele Della Valle, Thomas Eiter, Federico Giannini, Fredrik Heintz, Konstantin Schekotihin, Danh Le-Phuoc, Alessandra Mileo, Patrik Schneider, Riccardo Tommasini, Jacopo Urbani, and Giacomo Ziffer. Grounding Stream Reasoning Research. In Special Issue on Trends in Graph Data and Knowledge - Part 2. Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge (TGDK), Volume 2, Issue 1, pp. 2:1-2:47, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2024)


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@Article{bonte_et_al:TGDK.2.1.2,
  author =	{Bonte, Pieter and Calbimonte, Jean-Paul and de Leng, Daniel and Dell'Aglio, Daniele and Della Valle, Emanuele and Eiter, Thomas and Giannini, Federico and Heintz, Fredrik and Schekotihin, Konstantin and Le-Phuoc, Danh and Mileo, Alessandra and Schneider, Patrik and Tommasini, Riccardo and Urbani, Jacopo and Ziffer, Giacomo},
  title =	{{Grounding Stream Reasoning Research}},
  journal =	{Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge},
  pages =	{2:1--2:47},
  ISSN =	{2942-7517},
  year =	{2024},
  volume =	{2},
  number =	{1},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/TGDK.2.1.2},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-198597},
  doi =		{10.4230/TGDK.2.1.2},
  annote =	{Keywords: Stream Reasoning, Stream Processing, RDF streams, Streaming Linked Data, Continuous query processing, Temporal Logics, High-performance computing, Databases}
}
Document
Survey
Semantic Web: Past, Present, and Future

Authors: Ansgar Scherp, Gerd Groener, Petr Škoda, Katja Hose, and Maria-Esther Vidal

Published in: TGDK, Volume 2, Issue 1 (2024): Special Issue on Trends in Graph Data and Knowledge - Part 2. Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge, Volume 2, Issue 1


Abstract
Ever since the vision was formulated, the Semantic Web has inspired many generations of innovations. Semantic technologies have been used to share vast amounts of information on the Web, enhance them with semantics to give them meaning, and enable inference and reasoning on them. Throughout the years, semantic technologies, and in particular knowledge graphs, have been used in search engines, data integration, enterprise settings, and machine learning. In this paper, we recap the classical concepts and foundations of the Semantic Web as well as modern and recent concepts and applications, building upon these foundations. The classical topics we cover include knowledge representation, creating and validating knowledge on the Web, reasoning and linking, and distributed querying. We enhance this classical view of the so-called "Semantic Web Layer Cake" with an update of recent concepts that include provenance, security and trust, as well as a discussion of practical impacts from industry-led contributions. We conclude with an outlook on the future directions of the Semantic Web. This is a living document. If you like to contribute, please contact the first author and visit: https://github.com/ascherp/semantic-web-primer

Cite as

Ansgar Scherp, Gerd Groener, Petr Škoda, Katja Hose, and Maria-Esther Vidal. Semantic Web: Past, Present, and Future. In Special Issue on Trends in Graph Data and Knowledge - Part 2. Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge (TGDK), Volume 2, Issue 1, pp. 3:1-3:37, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2024)


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@Article{scherp_et_al:TGDK.2.1.3,
  author =	{Scherp, Ansgar and Groener, Gerd and \v{S}koda, Petr and Hose, Katja and Vidal, Maria-Esther},
  title =	{{Semantic Web: Past, Present, and Future}},
  journal =	{Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge},
  pages =	{3:1--3:37},
  ISSN =	{2942-7517},
  year =	{2024},
  volume =	{2},
  number =	{1},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/TGDK.2.1.3},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-198607},
  doi =		{10.4230/TGDK.2.1.3},
  annote =	{Keywords: Linked Open Data, Semantic Web Graphs, Knowledge Graphs}
}
Document
Position
Standardizing Knowledge Engineering Practices with a Reference Architecture

Authors: Bradley P. Allen and Filip Ilievski

Published in: TGDK, Volume 2, Issue 1 (2024): Special Issue on Trends in Graph Data and Knowledge - Part 2. Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge, Volume 2, Issue 1


Abstract
Knowledge engineering is the process of creating and maintaining knowledge-producing systems. Throughout the history of computer science and AI, knowledge engineering workflows have been widely used given the importance of high-quality knowledge for reliable intelligent agents. Meanwhile, the scope of knowledge engineering, as apparent from its target tasks and use cases, has been shifting, together with its paradigms such as expert systems, semantic web, and language modeling. The intended use cases and supported user requirements between these paradigms have not been analyzed globally, as new paradigms often satisfy prior pain points while possibly introducing new ones. The recent abstraction of systemic patterns into a boxology provides an opening for aligning the requirements and use cases of knowledge engineering with the systems, components, and software that can satisfy them best, however, this direction has not been explored to date. This paper proposes a vision of harmonizing the best practices in the field of knowledge engineering by leveraging the software engineering methodology of creating reference architectures. We describe how a reference architecture can be iteratively designed and implemented to associate user needs with recurring systemic patterns, building on top of existing knowledge engineering workflows and boxologies. We provide a six-step roadmap that can enable the development of such an architecture, consisting of scope definition, selection of information sources, architectural analysis, synthesis of an architecture based on the information source analysis, evaluation through instantiation, and, ultimately, instantiation into a concrete software architecture. We provide an initial design and outcome of the definition of architectural scope, selection of information sources, and analysis. As the remaining steps of design, evaluation, and instantiation of the architecture are largely use-case specific, we provide a detailed description of their procedures and point to relevant examples. We expect that following through on this vision will lead to well-grounded reference architectures for knowledge engineering, will advance the ongoing initiatives of organizing the neurosymbolic knowledge engineering space, and will build new links to the software architectures and data science communities.

Cite as

Bradley P. Allen and Filip Ilievski. Standardizing Knowledge Engineering Practices with a Reference Architecture. In Special Issue on Trends in Graph Data and Knowledge - Part 2. Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge (TGDK), Volume 2, Issue 1, pp. 5:1-5:23, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2024)


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@Article{allen_et_al:TGDK.2.1.5,
  author =	{Allen, Bradley P. and Ilievski, Filip},
  title =	{{Standardizing Knowledge Engineering Practices with a Reference Architecture}},
  journal =	{Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge},
  pages =	{5:1--5:23},
  ISSN =	{2942-7517},
  year =	{2024},
  volume =	{2},
  number =	{1},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/TGDK.2.1.5},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-198623},
  doi =		{10.4230/TGDK.2.1.5},
  annote =	{Keywords: knowledge engineering, knowledge graphs, quality attributes, software architectures, sociotechnical systems}
}
Document
08391 Group Summary – Mining for Social Serendipity

Authors: Alexandre Passant, Ian Mulvany, Peter Mika, Nicolas Maisonneuve, Alexander Löser, Ciro Cattuto, Christian Bizer, Christian Bauckhage, and Harith Alani

Published in: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 8391, Social Web Communities (2008)


Abstract
A common social problem at an event in which people do not personally know all of the other participants is the natural tendency for cliques to form and for discussions to mainly happen between people who already know each other. This limits the possibility for people to make interesting new acquaintances and acts as a retarding force in the creation of new links in the social web. Encouraging users to socialize with people they don't know by revealing to them hidden surprising links could help to improve the diversity of interactions at an event. The goal of this paper is to propose a method for detecting extit{"surprising"} relationships between people attending an event. By extit{"surprising"} relationship we mean those relationships that are not known a-priori, and that imply shared information not directly related with the local context of the event (location, interests, contacts) at which the meeting takes place. To demonstrate and test our concept we used the Flickr community. We focused on a community of users associated with a social event (a computer science conference) and represented in Flickr by means of a photo pool devoted to the event. We use Flickr metadata (tags) to mine for user similarity not related to the context of the event, as represented in the corresponding Flickr group. For example, we look for two group members who have been in the same highly specific place (identified by means of geo-tagged photos), but are not friends of each other and share no other common interests or, social neighborhood.

Cite as

Alexandre Passant, Ian Mulvany, Peter Mika, Nicolas Maisonneuve, Alexander Löser, Ciro Cattuto, Christian Bizer, Christian Bauckhage, and Harith Alani. 08391 Group Summary – Mining for Social Serendipity. In Social Web Communities. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 8391, pp. 1-11, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2008)


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@InProceedings{passant_et_al:DagSemProc.08391.3,
  author =	{Passant, Alexandre and Mulvany, Ian and Mika, Peter and Maisonneuve, Nicolas and L\"{o}ser, Alexander and Cattuto, Ciro and Bizer, Christian and Bauckhage, Christian and Alani, Harith},
  title =	{{08391 Group Summary – Mining for Social Serendipity}},
  booktitle =	{Social Web Communities},
  pages =	{1--11},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2008},
  volume =	{8391},
  editor =	{Harith Alani and Steffen Staab and Gerd Stumme},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.08391.3},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-17910},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.08391.3},
  annote =	{Keywords: Serendipity, online activity, context, ubiquitous computing}
}
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