13 Search Results for "Katz, Graham"


Document
Argument Structure in TimeML

Authors: James Pustejovsky, Jessica Littman, and Roser Sauri

Published in: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events (2005)


Abstract
TimeML is a specification language for the annotation of events and temporal expressions in natural language text. In addition, the language introduces three relational tags linking temporal objects and events to one another. These links impose both aspectual and temporal ordering over time objects, as well as mark up subordination contexts introduced by modality, evidentiality, and factivity. Given the richness of this specification, the TimeML working group decided not to include the arguments of events within the language specification itself. Full reasoning and inference over natural language texts clearly requires knowledge of events along with their participants. In this paper, we define the appropriate role of argumenthood within event markup and propose that TimeML should make a basic distinction between arguments that are events and those that are entities. We first review how TimeML treats event arguments in subordinating and aspectual contexts, creating event-event relations between predicate and argument. As it turns out, these constructions cover a large number of the argument types selected for by event predicates. We suggest that TimeML be enriched slightly to include causal predicates, such as {it lead to}, since these also involve event-event relations. We propose that all other verbal arguments be ignored by the specification, and any predicate-argument binding of participants to an event should be performed by independent means. In fact, except for the event-denoting arguments handled by the extension to TimeML proposed here, almost full temporal ordering of the events in a text can be computed without argument identification.

Cite as

James Pustejovsky, Jessica Littman, and Roser Sauri. Argument Structure in TimeML. In Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, pp. 1-14, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2006)


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@InProceedings{pustejovsky_et_al:DagSemProc.05151.4,
  author =	{Pustejovsky, James and Littman, Jessica and Sauri, Roser},
  title =	{{Argument Structure in TimeML}},
  booktitle =	{Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events},
  pages =	{1--14},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2006},
  volume =	{5151},
  editor =	{Graham Katz and James Pustejovsky and Frank Schilder},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.4},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-4498},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.4},
  annote =	{Keywords: Temporal annotation, event expressions, argument structure}
}
Document
05151 Abstracts Collection – Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events

Authors: Graham Katz, James Pustejovsky, and Frank Schilder

Published in: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events (2005)


Abstract
From 10.04.05 to 15.04.05, the Dagstuhl Seminar 05151 ``Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events'' was held in the International Conference and Research Center (IBFI), Schloss Dagstuhl. During the seminar, several participants presented their current research, and ongoing work and open problems were discussed. Abstracts of the presentations given during the seminar as well as abstracts of seminar results and ideas are put together in this paper. The first section describes the seminar topics and goals in general. Links to extended abstracts or full papers are provided, if available.

Cite as

Graham Katz, James Pustejovsky, and Frank Schilder. 05151 Abstracts Collection – Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events. In Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, pp. 1-9, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2005)


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@InProceedings{katz_et_al:DagSemProc.05151.1,
  author =	{Katz, Graham and Pustejovsky, James and Schilder, Frank},
  title =	{{05151 Abstracts Collection – Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events}},
  booktitle =	{Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events},
  pages =	{1--9},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2005},
  volume =	{5151},
  editor =	{Graham Katz and James Pustejovsky and Frank Schilder},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-3531},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: Text annotation, information extraction and retrieval, summarization, question answering, temporal reasoning}
}
Document
05151 Summary – Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events

Authors: Graham Katz, James Pustejovsky, and Frank Schilder

Published in: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events (2005)


Abstract
The main focus of the seminar was on TimeML-based temporal annotation and reasoning. We were concerned with three main points: determining how effectively one can use the TimeML language for consistent annotation, determining how useful such annotation is for further processing, and determining what modifications should be applied to the standard to improve its usefulness in applications such as question-answering and information retrieval.

Cite as

Graham Katz, James Pustejovsky, and Frank Schilder. 05151 Summary – Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events. In Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, pp. 1-9, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2005)


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@InProceedings{katz_et_al:DagSemProc.05151.2,
  author =	{Katz, Graham and Pustejovsky, James and Schilder, Frank},
  title =	{{05151 Summary – Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events}},
  booktitle =	{Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events},
  pages =	{1--9},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2005},
  volume =	{5151},
  editor =	{Graham Katz and James Pustejovsky and Frank Schilder},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.2},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-3541},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.2},
  annote =	{Keywords: Temporal information extraction, annotation, temporal reasoning, events}
}
Document
Drawing TimeML Relations with T-BOX

Authors: Marc Verhagen

Published in: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events (2005)


Abstract
T-BOX is a new way of visualizing the temporal relations in TimeML graphs. Currently, TimeML's temporal relations are usually presented as rows in a table or as directed labeled edges in a graph. I will argue that neither mode of representation scales up nicely when bigger documents are considered and that both make it harder than necessary to get a quick picture of what the temporal structure of a document is. T-BOX is an alternative way of visualizing TimeML graphs that uses left-to-right arrows, box-inclusions and stacking as three distinct ways to visualize precedence, inclusion and simultaneity.

Cite as

Marc Verhagen. Drawing TimeML Relations with T-BOX. In Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, pp. 1-15, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2005)


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@InProceedings{verhagen:DagSemProc.05151.7,
  author =	{Verhagen, Marc},
  title =	{{Drawing TimeML Relations with T-BOX}},
  booktitle =	{Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events},
  pages =	{1--15},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2005},
  volume =	{5151},
  editor =	{Graham Katz and James Pustejovsky and Frank Schilder},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.7},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-3181},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.7},
  annote =	{Keywords: Annotation, visualization, temporal annotation}
}
Document
From TimeML to TPL

Authors: Ian Pratt-Hartmann

Published in: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events (2005)


Abstract
This paper describes a subset of the temporal mark-up language TimeML, and explains its relation to various formalisms found in the literature on interval temporal logic. The subset of TimeML we describe can be viewed as an interval temporal logic with a tractable satisfiability problem, but very limited expressive power. Most crucially, that logic does not permit quantification over events. The contribution of this paper is to point out that, by choosing an appropriate interval temporal logic, it is possible to introduce quantification into representations of event-structure without sacrificing decidability.

Cite as

Ian Pratt-Hartmann. From TimeML to TPL. In Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, pp. 1-11, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2005)


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@InProceedings{pratthartmann:DagSemProc.05151.8,
  author =	{Pratt-Hartmann, Ian},
  title =	{{From TimeML to TPL}},
  booktitle =	{Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events},
  pages =	{1--11},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2005},
  volume =	{5151},
  editor =	{Graham Katz and James Pustejovsky and Frank Schilder},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.8},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-3128},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.8},
  annote =	{Keywords: Information Extraction, Interval temporal logic}
}
Document
Temporal information extraction from legal documents

Authors: Frank Schilder and Andrew McCulloh

Published in: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events (2005)


Abstract
The aim of this paper is to analyze what kinds of temporal information can be found in different types of legal documents. In particular, it provides a comparison of different legal document types (case law, statute or transactional document) andit discusses how one can do further reasoning with the extracted temporal information.

Cite as

Frank Schilder and Andrew McCulloh. Temporal information extraction from legal documents. In Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, pp. 1-9, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2005)


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@InProceedings{schilder_et_al:DagSemProc.05151.9,
  author =	{Schilder, Frank and McCulloh, Andrew},
  title =	{{Temporal information extraction from legal documents}},
  booktitle =	{Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events},
  pages =	{1--9},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2005},
  volume =	{5151},
  editor =	{Graham Katz and James Pustejovsky and Frank Schilder},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.9},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-3139},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.9},
  annote =	{Keywords: Extraction of temporal information, temporal reasoning, legal documents}
}
Document
Text Type and the Position of a Temporal Adverbial within the Sentence

Authors: Janet Hitzeman

Published in: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events (2005)


Abstract
A sentence with a certain type of temporal adverbial is ambiguous, and one reading is lost when the adverbial appears in sentence-initial position. Sentence (1a), for example, has a reading in which there was some three-hear period in the past during which Mary lived in Amsterdam and a reading in which Mary has lived in Amsterdam for the three years preceding speech time: (1) a. Mary has lived in Amsterdam for three years. b. For three years Mary has lived in Amsterdam. Sentence (1b) has only the reading in which Mary lives in Amsterdam at speech time and has done so for the preceding three years. The reading that remains when the adverbial is in sentence-initial position is more specific about the time at which the event occurs, and therefore one would expect to see more initial-position adverbials in a narrative text, where the order of events is important. In testing this hypothesis on the ECI corpus, it was found that it is not the narrative/non-narrative distinction that results in a significant difference in initial-position adverbial usage; Instead, narratives with a large amount of flashback material have significantly more initial position adverbials, indicating that in order to accurately predict adverbial position a subclassification of the category "narrative" based on the amount of flashback material is needed.

Cite as

Janet Hitzeman. Text Type and the Position of a Temporal Adverbial within the Sentence. In Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, pp. 1-26, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2005)


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@InProceedings{hitzeman:DagSemProc.05151.10,
  author =	{Hitzeman, Janet},
  title =	{{Text Type and the Position of a Temporal Adverbial within the Sentence}},
  booktitle =	{Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events},
  pages =	{1--26},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2005},
  volume =	{5151},
  editor =	{Graham Katz and James Pustejovsky and Frank Schilder},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.10},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-3176},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.10},
  annote =	{Keywords: Temporal adverbials, narrative, flashbacks}
}
Document
TimeBank-Driven TimeML Analysis

Authors: Branimir Boguraev and Rie Kubota Ando

Published in: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events (2005)


Abstract
The design of TimeML as an expressive language for temporal information brings promises, and challenges; in particular, its representational properties raise the bar for traditional information extraction methods applied to the task of text-to-TimeML analysis. A reference corpus, such as TimeBank, is an invaluable asset in this situation; however, certain characteristics of TimeBank---size and consistency, primarily---present challenges of their own. We discuss the design, implementation, and performance of an automatic TimeML-compliant annotator, trained on TimeBank, and deploying a hybrid analytical strategy of mixing aggressive finite-state processing over linguistic annotations with a state-of-the-art machine learning technique capable of leveraging large amounts of unannotated data. The results we report are encouraging in the light of a close analysis of TimeBank; at the same time they are indicative of the need for more infrastructure work, especially in the direction of creating a larger and more robust reference corpus.

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Branimir Boguraev and Rie Kubota Ando. TimeBank-Driven TimeML Analysis. In Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, pp. 1-22, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2005)


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@InProceedings{boguraev_et_al:DagSemProc.05151.11,
  author =	{Boguraev, Branimir and Ando, Rie Kubota},
  title =	{{TimeBank-Driven TimeML Analysis}},
  booktitle =	{Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events},
  pages =	{1--22},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2005},
  volume =	{5151},
  editor =	{Graham Katz and James Pustejovsky and Frank Schilder},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.11},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-3354},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.11},
  annote =	{Keywords: TimeML analysis, TimeBank corpus, TimeML-compliant temporal information extraction, finite-state processing, machine learning, corpus analysis}
}
Document
Towards Task-Based Temporal Extraction and Recognition

Authors: David Ahn, Sisay Fissaha Adafre, and Maarten de Rijke

Published in: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events (2005)


Abstract
We seek to improve the robustness and portability of temporal information extraction systems by incorporating data-driven techniques. We present two sets of experiments pointing us in this direction. The first shows that machine-learning-based recognition of temporal expressions not only achieves high accuracy on its own but can also improve rule-based normalization. The second makes use of a staged normalization architecture to experiment with machine learned classifiers for certain disambiguation sub-tasks within the normalization task.

Cite as

David Ahn, Sisay Fissaha Adafre, and Maarten de Rijke. Towards Task-Based Temporal Extraction and Recognition. In Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, pp. 1-16, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2005)


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@InProceedings{ahn_et_al:DagSemProc.05151.12,
  author =	{Ahn, David and Fissaha Adafre, Sisay and de Rijke, Maarten},
  title =	{{Towards Task-Based Temporal Extraction and Recognition}},
  booktitle =	{Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events},
  pages =	{1--16},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2005},
  volume =	{5151},
  editor =	{Graham Katz and James Pustejovsky and Frank Schilder},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.12},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-3150},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.12},
  annote =	{Keywords: Information extraction, natural language, temporal reasoning, text mining}
}
Document
Veridicity

Authors: Lauri Karttunen and Annie Zaenen

Published in: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events (2005)


Abstract
This paper addresses the problem of assessing the veridicity of textual content. Has an event mentioned in the text really occurred? Who is the source of the information? What is the stance of the author of the text? Does the author indicate whether he believes the source? We will survey some of linguistic conventions that indicate the author's commitment, or the lack thereof, to the propositions contained in her text. In particular we discuss phenomena that have been studied as presuppositions or conventional implicatures in previous literature. Some of those, such as factive and non-factive verbs, have received extensive attention in the past. Some others, such as supplemental expressions (e.g. appositives, parentheticals), have not received much previous attention, although they are very common and a rich source of textual inferences. A recent study by Christopher Potts classifies supplemental expressions as conventional implicatures. We agree with Potts on the label but not on what it means. In contrast to Potts, we claim that supplemental expressions cannot always be treated as the author's direct commitments and argue that they do not constitute a basis for a distinction between presuppositions and conventional implicatures. We illustrate some cases of conventional implicature and show how they indicate an author's commitment to the truth of his statements and briefly state the importance of these distinctions for Information Extraction (IE).

Cite as

Lauri Karttunen and Annie Zaenen. Veridicity. In Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, pp. 1-9, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2005)


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@InProceedings{karttunen_et_al:DagSemProc.05151.13,
  author =	{Karttunen, Lauri and Zaenen, Annie},
  title =	{{Veridicity}},
  booktitle =	{Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events},
  pages =	{1--9},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2005},
  volume =	{5151},
  editor =	{Graham Katz and James Pustejovsky and Frank Schilder},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.13},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-3148},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.13},
  annote =	{Keywords: Veridicity, conventional implicature, presupposition}
}
Document
Anchoring Temporal Expressions in Scheduling-related Emails

Authors: Benjamin Han, Donna Gates, and Lori Levin

Published in: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events (2005)


Abstract
In this paper we adopt a constraint-based representation of time, Time Calculus (TC), for anchoring temporal expressions in a novel genre, emails. Email is sufficiently different from the most studied genre - newswire texts, and its highly under-specified nature fits well with our representation. The evaluation of our anchoring system shows that it performs significantly better than the baseline, and the result compares favorably with some of the closest related work.

Cite as

Benjamin Han, Donna Gates, and Lori Levin. Anchoring Temporal Expressions in Scheduling-related Emails. In Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, pp. 1-11, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2005)


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@InProceedings{han_et_al:DagSemProc.05151.3,
  author =	{Han, Benjamin and Gates, Donna and Levin, Lori},
  title =	{{Anchoring Temporal Expressions in Scheduling-related Emails}},
  booktitle =	{Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events},
  pages =	{1--11},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2005},
  volume =	{5151},
  editor =	{Graham Katz and James Pustejovsky and Frank Schilder},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.3},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-3163},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.3},
  annote =	{Keywords: Temporal information processing, computational semantics, knowledge representation, constraint solving}
}
Document
Chronoscopes: A theory of underspecified temporal representations

Authors: Inderjeet Mani

Published in: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events (2005)


Abstract
Representation and reasoning about time and events is a fundamental aspect of our cognitive abilities and intrinsic to our construal of the structure of our personal and historical lives and recall of past experiences. This talk describes an abstract device called a Chronoscope, that allows a temporal representation (a set of events and their temporal relations) to be viewed based on temporal abstractions. The temporal representation is augmented with abstract events called episodes that stand for discourse segments. The temporal abstractions allow one to collapse temporal relations, or view the representation at different time granularities (hour, day, month, year, etc.), with corresponding changes in event characterization and temporal relations at those granularities. A temporal representation can also be filtered to specify temporal trajectories of particular participants. Trajectories, in turn, can be intersected at various levels of granularity. Chronoscopes can be used to compare temporal representations (e.g., for aggregation, summarization, or evaluation purposes), as well as help in the visualization of temporal narratives

Cite as

Inderjeet Mani. Chronoscopes: A theory of underspecified temporal representations. In Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, pp. 1-11, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2005)


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@InProceedings{mani:DagSemProc.05151.5,
  author =	{Mani, Inderjeet},
  title =	{{Chronoscopes: A theory of underspecified temporal representations}},
  booktitle =	{Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events},
  pages =	{1--11},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2005},
  volume =	{5151},
  editor =	{Graham Katz and James Pustejovsky and Frank Schilder},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.5},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-3365},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.5},
  annote =	{Keywords: Temporal abstraction, granularity, event structure}
}
Document
Computational Treatment of Temporal Notions – The CTTN-System

Authors: Hans-Jürgen Ohlbach

Published in: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events (2005)


Abstract
The CTTN-system is a computer program which provides advanced processing or temporal notions. The basic data structures of the CTTN-system are time points, crisp and fuzzy time intervals, labelled partitionings of the time line, durations, and calendar systems. The labelled partitionings are used to model periodic temporal notions, quite regular ones like years, months etc., partially regular ones like timetables, but also very irregular ones like, for example, dates of a conference series. These data structures can be used in the temporal specification language GeTS (GeoTemporal Specifications). GeTS is a functional specification and programming language with a number of built-in constructs for specifying customized temporal notions. CTTN is implemented as a Web server and as a C++ library. This paper gives a short overview over the current state of the system and its components.

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Hans-Jürgen Ohlbach. Computational Treatment of Temporal Notions – The CTTN-System. In Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5151, pp. 1-8, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2005)


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@InProceedings{ohlbach:DagSemProc.05151.6,
  author =	{Ohlbach, Hans-J\"{u}rgen},
  title =	{{Computational Treatment of Temporal Notions – The CTTN-System}},
  booktitle =	{Annotating, Extracting and Reasoning about Time and Events},
  pages =	{1--8},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2005},
  volume =	{5151},
  editor =	{Graham Katz and James Pustejovsky and Frank Schilder},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.6},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-3115},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05151.6},
  annote =	{Keywords: Formalizing temporal notions}
}
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