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URN: urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-22209
URL: http://drops.dagstuhl.de/opus/volltexte/2009/2220/

Brown, David

Computational Artistic Creativity and its Evaluation

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Abstract

For artistic creativity, in comparison to design creativity, requirements may not exist, and constraints on the artifact (the artistic “product”) are usually looser or absent. Many computational creativity systems produce artistic artifacts, but such results can be judged in a variety of ways: by a variety of artistic standards or by the perceiver’s "taste", for example. There is less chance of a generated artifact being judged in a single, clear and concrete fashion, so the standards may be softer and perhaps easier to satisfy: certainly harder to make computational. With regard to taste, Boden (1994) quotes, "I don’t know anything about art, but I know what I like”. If this were true in general, then there would be as many tests of the creativity of an artifact as there are people!

BibTeX - Entry

@InProceedings{brown:DSP:2009:2220,
  author =	{David Brown},
  title =	{Computational Artistic Creativity and its Evaluation},
  booktitle =	{Computational Creativity: An Interdisciplinary Approach},
  year =	{2009},
  editor =	{Margaret Boden and Mark D'Inverno and Jon McCormack},
  number =	{09291},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum fuer Informatik, Germany},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{http://drops.dagstuhl.de/opus/volltexte/2009/2220},
  annote =	{Keywords: Evaluation, design creativity, artistic creativity, novelty, resolution, style, function}
}

Keywords: Evaluation, design creativity, artistic creativity, novelty, resolution, style, function
Seminar: 09291 - Computational Creativity: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Issue date: 2009
Date of publication: 07.10.2009


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