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How Reversibility Can Solve Traditional Questions: The Example of Hereditary History-Preserving Bisimulation

Authors Clément Aubert , Ioana Cristescu



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Author Details

Clément Aubert
  • School of Computer and Cyber Sciences, Augusta University, GA, USA
Ioana Cristescu
  • Tarides, Paris, France

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank John Natale for correcting the definition of postfixing and the reviewers of an earlier version of this work and of this version for their precious comments that greatly improved the paper. We were unfortunately not able to accomodate all of their suggestions, but have tried to reflect their comments in the body of the paper.

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Clément Aubert and Ioana Cristescu. How Reversibility Can Solve Traditional Questions: The Example of Hereditary History-Preserving Bisimulation. In 31st International Conference on Concurrency Theory (CONCUR 2020). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 171, pp. 7:1-7:23, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2020)
https://doi.org/10.4230/LIPIcs.CONCUR.2020.7

Abstract

Reversible computation opens up the possibility of overcoming some of the hardware’s current physical limitations. It also offers theoretical insights, as it enriches multiple paradigms and models of computation, and sometimes retrospectively enlightens them. Concurrent reversible computation, for instance, offered interesting extensions to the Calculus of Communicating Systems, but was still lacking a natural and pertinent bisimulation to study processes equivalences. Our paper formulates an equivalence exploiting the two aspects of reversibility: backward moves and memory mechanisms. This bisimulation captures classical equivalences relations for denotational models of concurrency (history- and hereditary history-preserving bisimulation, (H)HPB), that were up to now only partially characterized by process algebras. This result gives an insight on the expressiveness of reversibility, as both backward moves and a memory mechanism - providing "backward determinism" - are needed to capture HHPB.

Subject Classification

ACM Subject Classification
  • Theory of computation → Program semantics
  • Computing methodologies → Concurrent programming languages
Keywords
  • Formal semantics
  • Process algebras and calculi
  • Distributed and reversible computation
  • Configuration structures
  • Reversible CCS
  • Bisimulation

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