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Byzantine Consensus with Local Multicast Channels

Authors Muhammad Samir Khan, Nitin H. Vaidya



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Author Details

Muhammad Samir Khan
  • Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA
Nitin H. Vaidya
  • Department of Computer Science, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA

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Muhammad Samir Khan and Nitin H. Vaidya. Byzantine Consensus with Local Multicast Channels. In 35th International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2021). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 209, pp. 26:1-26:16, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2021)
https://doi.org/10.4230/LIPIcs.DISC.2021.26

Abstract

Byzantine consensus is a classical problem in distributed computing. Each node in a synchronous system starts with a binary input. The goal is to reach agreement in the presence of Byzantine faulty nodes. We consider the setting where communication between nodes is modelled via an undirected communication graph. In the classical point-to-point communication model all messages sent on an edge are private between the two endpoints of the edge. This allows a faulty node to equivocate, i.e., lie differently to its different neighbors. Different models have been proposed in the literature that weaken equivocation. In the local broadcast model, every message transmitted by a node is received identically and correctly by all of its neighbors. In the hypergraph model, every message transmitted by a node on a hyperedge is received identically and correctly by all nodes on the hyperedge. Tight network conditions are known for each of the three cases. We introduce a more general model that encompasses all three of these models. In the local multicast model, each node u has one or more local multicast channels. Each channel consists of multiple neighbors of u in the communication graph. When node u sends a message on a channel, it is received identically by all of its neighbors on the channel. For this model, we identify tight network conditions for consensus. We observe how the local multicast model reduces to each of the three models above under specific conditions. In each of the three cases, we relate our network condition to the corresponding known tight conditions. The local multicast model also encompasses other practical network models of interest that have not been explored previously, as elaborated in the paper.

Subject Classification

ACM Subject Classification
  • Theory of computation → Distributed algorithms
Keywords
  • Byzantine fault
  • distributed algorithm
  • consensus
  • broadcast
  • multicast

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