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Algebraic Restriction Codes and Their Applications

Authors Divesh Aggarwal, Nico Döttling , Jesko Dujmovic, Mohammad Hajiabadi, Giulio Malavolta, Maciej Obremski



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Author Details

Divesh Aggarwal
  • National University of Singapore, Singapore
Nico Döttling
  • Helmholtz Center for Information Security (CISPA), Saarbrücken, Germany
Jesko Dujmovic
  • Helmholtz Center for Information Security (CISPA), Saarbrücken, Germany
  • Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany
Mohammad Hajiabadi
  • University of Waterloo, ON, Canada
Giulio Malavolta
  • Max Planck Institute for Security and Privacy, Bochum, Germany
Maciej Obremski
  • National University of Singapore, Singapore

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Divesh Aggarwal, Nico Döttling, Jesko Dujmovic, Mohammad Hajiabadi, Giulio Malavolta, and Maciej Obremski. Algebraic Restriction Codes and Their Applications. In 13th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2022). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 215, pp. 2:1-2:15, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)
https://doi.org/10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2022.2

Abstract

Consider the following problem: You have a device that is supposed to compute a linear combination of its inputs, which are taken from some finite field. However, the device may be faulty and compute arbitrary functions of its inputs. Is it possible to encode the inputs in such a way that only linear functions can be evaluated over the encodings? I.e., learning an arbitrary function of the encodings will not reveal more information about the inputs than a linear combination. In this work, we introduce the notion of algebraic restriction codes (AR codes), which constrain adversaries who might compute any function to computing a linear function. Our main result is an information-theoretic construction AR codes that restrict any class of function with a bounded number of output bits to linear functions. Our construction relies on a seed which is not provided to the adversary. While interesting and natural on its own, we show an application of this notion in cryptography. In particular, we show that AR codes lead to the first construction of rate-1 oblivious transfer with statistical sender security from the Decisional Diffie-Hellman assumption, and the first-ever construction that makes black-box use of cryptography. Previously, such protocols were known only from the LWE assumption, using non-black-box cryptographic techniques. We expect our new notion of AR codes to find further applications, e.g., in the context of non-malleability, in the future.

Subject Classification

ACM Subject Classification
  • Security and privacy → Information-theoretic techniques
  • Security and privacy → Public key (asymmetric) techniques
Keywords
  • Algebraic Restriction Codes
  • Oblivious Transfer
  • Rate 1
  • Statistically Sender Private
  • OT
  • Diffie-Hellman
  • DDH

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