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Broadcasting with Mobile Agents in Dynamic Networks

Authors Shantanu Das , Nikos Giachoudis, Flaminia L. Luccio , Euripides Markou



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Shantanu Das
  • Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, Université de Toulon, LIS, Marseille, France
Nikos Giachoudis
  • DCSBI, University of Thessaly, Lamia, Greece
Flaminia L. Luccio
  • DAIS, Università Ca' Foscari Venezia, Italy
Euripides Markou
  • DCSBI, University of Thessaly, Lamia, Greece

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Shantanu Das, Nikos Giachoudis, Flaminia L. Luccio, and Euripides Markou. Broadcasting with Mobile Agents in Dynamic Networks. In 24th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2020). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 184, pp. 24:1-24:16, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2021)
https://doi.org/10.4230/LIPIcs.OPODIS.2020.24

Abstract

We study the standard communication problem of broadcast for mobile agents moving in a network. The agents move autonomously in the network and can communicate with other agents only when they meet at a node. In this model, broadcast is a communication primitive for information transfer from one agent, the source, to all other agents. Previous studies of this problem were restricted to static networks while, in this paper, we consider the problem in dynamic networks modelled as an evolving graph. The dynamicity of the graph is unknown to the agents; in each round an adversary selects which edges of the graph are available, and an agent can choose to traverse one of the available edges adjacent to its current location. The only restriction on the adversary is that the subgraph of available edges in each round must span all nodes; in other words the evolving graph is constantly connected. The agents have global visibility allowing them to see the location of other agents in the graph and move accordingly. Depending on the topology of the underlying graph, we determine how many agents are necessary and sufficient to solve the broadcast problem in dynamic networks. While two agents plus the source are sufficient for ring networks, much larger teams of agents are necessary for denser graphs such as grid graphs and hypercubes, and finally for complete graphs of n nodes at least n-2 agents plus the source are necessary and sufficient. We show lower bounds on the number of agents and provide some algorithms for solving broadcast using the minimum number of agents, for various topologies.

Subject Classification

ACM Subject Classification
  • Networks → Network algorithms
  • Theory of computation → Distributed algorithms
  • Theory of computation → Graph algorithms analysis
Keywords
  • Distributed Algorithm
  • Dynamic Networks
  • Mobile Agents
  • Broadcast
  • Constantly Connected
  • Global visibility

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