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A Modular Approach to Construct Signature-Free BRB Algorithms Under a Message Adversary

Authors Timothé Albouy, Davide Frey, Michel Raynal, François Taïani



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Author Details

Timothé Albouy
  • Univ Rennes, Inria, CNRS, IRISA, France
Davide Frey
  • Univ Rennes, Inria, CNRS, IRISA, France
Michel Raynal
  • Univ Rennes, Inria, CNRS, IRISA, France
François Taïani
  • Univ Rennes, Inria, CNRS, IRISA, France

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Timothé Albouy, Davide Frey, Michel Raynal, and François Taïani. A Modular Approach to Construct Signature-Free BRB Algorithms Under a Message Adversary. In 26th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2022). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 253, pp. 26:1-26:23, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2023)
https://doi.org/10.4230/LIPIcs.OPODIS.2022.26

Abstract

This paper explores how reliable broadcast can be implemented without signatures when facing a dual adversary that can both corrupt processes and remove messages. More precisely, we consider an asynchronous n-process message-passing system in which up to t processes are Byzantine and where, at the network level, for each message broadcast by a correct process, an adversary can prevent up to d processes from receiving it (the integer d defines the power of the message adversary). So, unlike previous works, this work considers that not only can computing entities be faulty (Byzantine processes), but, in addition, that the network can also lose messages. To this end, the paper adopts a modular strategy and first introduces a new basic communication abstraction denoted k2𝓁-cast, which simplifies quorum engineering, and studies its properties in this new adversarial context. Then, the paper deconstructs existing signature-free Byzantine-tolerant asynchronous broadcast algorithms and, with the help of the k2𝓁-cast communication abstraction, reconstructs versions of them that tolerate both Byzantine processes and message adversaries. Interestingly, these reconstructed algorithms are also more efficient than the Byzantine-tolerant-only algorithms from which they originate.

Subject Classification

ACM Subject Classification
  • Theory of computation → Distributed algorithms
Keywords
  • Asynchronous system
  • Byzantine processes
  • Communication abstraction
  • Delivery predicate
  • Fault-Tolerance
  • Forwarding predicate
  • Message adversary
  • Message loss
  • Modularity
  • Quorum
  • Reliable broadcast
  • Signature-free algorithm
  • Two-phase commit

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