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Search by a Metamorphic Robotic System in a Finite 3D Cubic Grid

Authors Ryonosuke Yamada, Yukiko Yamauchi



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Ryonosuke Yamada
  • Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
Yukiko Yamauchi
  • Faculty of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan

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Ryonosuke Yamada and Yukiko Yamauchi. Search by a Metamorphic Robotic System in a Finite 3D Cubic Grid. In 1st Symposium on Algorithmic Foundations of Dynamic Networks (SAND 2022). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 221, pp. 20:1-20:16, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)
https://doi.org/10.4230/LIPIcs.SAND.2022.20

Abstract

We consider search in a finite 3D cubic grid by a metamorphic robotic system (MRS), that consists of anonymous modules. A module can perform a sliding and rotation while the whole modules keep connectivity. As the number of modules increases, the variety of actions that the MRS can perform increases. The search problem requires the MRS to find a target in a given finite field. Doi et al. (SSS 2018) demonstrate a necessary and sufficient number of modules for search in a finite 2D square grid. We consider search in a finite 3D cubic grid and investigate the effect of common knowledge. We consider three different settings. First, we show that three modules are necessary and sufficient when all modules are equipped with a common compass, i.e., they agree on the direction and orientation of the x, y, and z axes. Second, we show that four modules are necessary and sufficient when all modules agree on the direction and orientation of the vertical axis. Finally, we show that five modules are necessary and sufficient when all modules are not equipped with a common compass. Our results show that the shapes of the MRS in the 3D cubic grid have richer structure than those in the 2D square grid.

Subject Classification

ACM Subject Classification
  • Theory of computation → Distributed algorithms
  • Computer systems organization → Robotic autonomy
Keywords
  • Distributed system
  • metamorphic robotic system
  • search
  • and 3D cubic grid

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