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Investigation of Database Models for Evolving Graphs

Authors Alexandros Spitalas, Anastasios Gounaris , Kostas Tsichlas, Andreas Kosmatopoulos



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Author Details

Alexandros Spitalas
  • Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Anastasios Gounaris
  • Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Kostas Tsichlas
  • University of Patras, Greece
Andreas Kosmatopoulos
  • Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Acknowledgements

The open access publication of this article was supported by the Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt, Austria.

Cite AsGet BibTex

Alexandros Spitalas, Anastasios Gounaris, Kostas Tsichlas, and Andreas Kosmatopoulos. Investigation of Database Models for Evolving Graphs. In 28th International Symposium on Temporal Representation and Reasoning (TIME 2021). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 206, pp. 6:1-6:13, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2021)
https://doi.org/10.4230/LIPIcs.TIME.2021.6

Abstract

We deal with the efficient implementation of storage models for time-varying graphs. To this end, we present an improved approach for the HiNode vertex-centric model based on MongoDB. This approach, apart from its inherent space optimality, exhibits significant improvements in global query execution times, which is the most challenging query type for entity-centric approaches. Not only significant speedups are achieved but more expensive queries can be executed as well, when compared to an implementation based on Cassandra due to the capability to exploit indices to a larger extent and benefit from in-database query processing.

Subject Classification

ACM Subject Classification
  • Information systems → Database design and models
Keywords
  • Temporal Graphs
  • Indexing

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References

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