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Documents authored by Tamma, Valentina


Document
Position
Knowledge Graphs for the Life Sciences: Recent Developments, Challenges and Opportunities

Authors: Jiaoyan Chen, Hang Dong, Janna Hastings, Ernesto Jiménez-Ruiz, Vanessa López, Pierre Monnin, Catia Pesquita, Petr Škoda, and Valentina Tamma

Published in: TGDK, Volume 1, Issue 1 (2023): Special Issue on Trends in Graph Data and Knowledge. Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge, Volume 1, Issue 1


Abstract
The term life sciences refers to the disciplines that study living organisms and life processes, and include chemistry, biology, medicine, and a range of other related disciplines. Research efforts in life sciences are heavily data-driven, as they produce and consume vast amounts of scientific data, much of which is intrinsically relational and graph-structured. The volume of data and the complexity of scientific concepts and relations referred to therein promote the application of advanced knowledge-driven technologies for managing and interpreting data, with the ultimate aim to advance scientific discovery. In this survey and position paper, we discuss recent developments and advances in the use of graph-based technologies in life sciences and set out a vision for how these technologies will impact these fields into the future. We focus on three broad topics: the construction and management of Knowledge Graphs (KGs), the use of KGs and associated technologies in the discovery of new knowledge, and the use of KGs in artificial intelligence applications to support explanations (explainable AI). We select a few exemplary use cases for each topic, discuss the challenges and open research questions within these topics, and conclude with a perspective and outlook that summarizes the overarching challenges and their potential solutions as a guide for future research.

Cite as

Jiaoyan Chen, Hang Dong, Janna Hastings, Ernesto Jiménez-Ruiz, Vanessa López, Pierre Monnin, Catia Pesquita, Petr Škoda, and Valentina Tamma. Knowledge Graphs for the Life Sciences: Recent Developments, Challenges and Opportunities. In Special Issue on Trends in Graph Data and Knowledge. Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge (TGDK), Volume 1, Issue 1, pp. 5:1-5:33, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2023)


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@Article{chen_et_al:TGDK.1.1.5,
  author =	{Chen, Jiaoyan and Dong, Hang and Hastings, Janna and Jim\'{e}nez-Ruiz, Ernesto and L\'{o}pez, Vanessa and Monnin, Pierre and Pesquita, Catia and \v{S}koda, Petr and Tamma, Valentina},
  title =	{{Knowledge Graphs for the Life Sciences: Recent Developments, Challenges and Opportunities}},
  journal =	{Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge},
  pages =	{5:1--5:33},
  year =	{2023},
  volume =	{1},
  number =	{1},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/TGDK.1.1.5},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-194791},
  doi =		{10.4230/TGDK.1.1.5},
  annote =	{Keywords: Knowledge graphs, Life science, Knowledge discovery, Explainable AI}
}
Document
Vision
Autonomy in the Age of Knowledge Graphs: Vision and Challenges

Authors: Jean-Paul Calbimonte, Andrei Ciortea, Timotheus Kampik, Simon Mayer, Terry R. Payne, Valentina Tamma, and Antoine Zimmermann

Published in: TGDK, Volume 1, Issue 1 (2023): Special Issue on Trends in Graph Data and Knowledge. Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge, Volume 1, Issue 1


Abstract
In this position paper, we propose that Knowledge Graphs (KGs) are one of the prime approaches to support the programming of autonomous software systems at the knowledge level. From this viewpoint, we survey how KGs can support different dimensions of autonomy in such systems: For example, the autonomy of systems with respect to their environment, or with respect to organisations; and we discuss related practical and research challenges. We emphasise that KGs need to be able to support systems of autonomous software agents that are themselves highly heterogeneous, which limits how these systems may use KGs. Furthermore, these heterogeneous software agents may populate highly dynamic environments, which implies that they require adaptive KGs. The scale of the envisioned systems - possibly stretching to the size of the Internet - highlights the maintainability of the underlying KGs that need to contain large-scale knowledge, which requires that KGs are maintained jointly by humans and machines. Furthermore, autonomous agents require procedural knowledge, and KGs should hence be explored more towards the provisioning of such knowledge to augment autonomous behaviour. Finally, we highlight the importance of modelling choices, including with respect to the selected abstraction level when modelling and with respect to the provisioning of more expressive constraint languages.

Cite as

Jean-Paul Calbimonte, Andrei Ciortea, Timotheus Kampik, Simon Mayer, Terry R. Payne, Valentina Tamma, and Antoine Zimmermann. Autonomy in the Age of Knowledge Graphs: Vision and Challenges. In Special Issue on Trends in Graph Data and Knowledge. Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge (TGDK), Volume 1, Issue 1, pp. 13:1-13:22, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2023)


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@Article{calbimonte_et_al:TGDK.1.1.13,
  author =	{Calbimonte, Jean-Paul and Ciortea, Andrei and Kampik, Timotheus and Mayer, Simon and Payne, Terry R. and Tamma, Valentina and Zimmermann, Antoine},
  title =	{{Autonomy in the Age of Knowledge Graphs: Vision and Challenges}},
  journal =	{Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge},
  pages =	{13:1--13:22},
  year =	{2023},
  volume =	{1},
  number =	{1},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/TGDK.1.1.13},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-194872},
  doi =		{10.4230/TGDK.1.1.13},
  annote =	{Keywords: Knowledge graphs, Autonomous Systems}
}
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