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Gaze Sequences and Map Task Complexity (Short Paper)

Authors Fabian Göbel, Peter Kiefer, Ioannis Giannopoulos, Martin Raubal



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Author Details

Fabian Göbel
  • Institute of Cartography and Geoinformation, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
Peter Kiefer
  • Institute of Cartography and Geoinformation, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
Ioannis Giannopoulos
  • Department of Geodesy and Geoinformation, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria
Martin Raubal
  • Institute of Cartography and Geoinformation, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

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Fabian Göbel, Peter Kiefer, Ioannis Giannopoulos, and Martin Raubal. Gaze Sequences and Map Task Complexity (Short Paper). In 10th International Conference on Geographic Information Science (GIScience 2018). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 114, pp. 30:1-30:6, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)
https://doi.org/10.4230/LIPIcs.GISCIENCE.2018.30

Abstract

As maps are visual representations of spatial context to communicate geographic information, analysis of gaze behavior is promising to improve map design. In this research we investigate the impact of map task complexity and different legend types on the visual attention of a user. With an eye tracking experiment we could show that the complexity of two map tasks can be measured and compared based on AOI sequences analysis. This knowledge can help to improve map design for static maps or in the context of interactive systems, create better map interfaces, that adapt to the user's current task.

Subject Classification

ACM Subject Classification
  • Human-centered computing → Empirical studies in HCI
Keywords
  • eye tracking
  • sequence analysis
  • map task complexity

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References

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