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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 7



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Complete Issue
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 7, July 2014, Complete Issue

Abstract
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 7, July 2014, Complete Issue

Cite as

Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 7, July 2014, Complete Issue. In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 7, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{DagRep.4.7,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 7, July 2014, Complete Issue}},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{7},
  editor =	{},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.7},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-48223},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.7},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 7, July 2014, Complete Issue}
}
Document
Front Matter
Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 4, Issue 7, 2014

Abstract
Table of Contents, Frontmatter

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Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 4, Issue 7, 2014. In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 7, pp. i-ii, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{DagRep.4.7.i,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 4, Issue 7, 2014}},
  pages =	{i--ii},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{7},
  editor =	{},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.7.i},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-48218},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.7.i},
  annote =	{Keywords: Table of Contents, Frontmatter}
}
Document
Feature Interactions: The Next Generation (Dagstuhl Seminar 14281)

Authors: Sven Apel, Joanne M. Atlee, Luciano Baresi, and Pamela Zave


Abstract
The feature-interaction problem is a major threat to modularity and impairs compositional development and reasoning. A feature interaction occurs when the behavior of one feature is affected by the presence of another feature; often it cannot be deduced easily from the behaviors of the individual features involved. The feature-interaction problem became a crisis in the telecommunications industry in the late 1980s, and researchers responded with formalisms that enable automatic detection of feature interactions, architectures that avoid classes of interactions, and techniques for resolving interactions at run-time. While this pioneering work was foundational and very successful, it is limited in the sense that it is based on assumptions that hold only for telecommunication systems. In the meantime, different notions of feature interactions have emerged in different communities, including Internet applications, service systems, adaptive systems, automotive systems, software product lines, requirements engineering, and computational biology. So, feature interactions are a much more general concept than investigated in the past in the context of telecommunication systems, but a classification, comparison, and generalization of the multitude of different views is missing. The feature-interaction problem is still of pivotal importance in various industrial applications, and the Dagstuhl seminar "Feature Interactions: The Next Generation" gathered researchers and practitioners from different areas of computer science and other disciplines with the goal to compare, discuss, and consolidate their views, experience, and domain-specific solutions to the feature-interaction problem.

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Sven Apel, Joanne M. Atlee, Luciano Baresi, and Pamela Zave. Feature Interactions: The Next Generation (Dagstuhl Seminar 14281). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 7, pp. 1-24, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{apel_et_al:DagRep.4.7.1,
  author =	{Apel, Sven and Atlee, Joanne M. and Baresi, Luciano and Zave, Pamela},
  title =	{{Feature Interactions: The Next Generation (Dagstuhl Seminar 14281)}},
  pages =	{1--24},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{7},
  editor =	{Apel, Sven and Atlee, Joanne M. and Baresi, Luciano and Zave, Pamela},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.7.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-47830},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.7.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: Feature interactions, feature-interaction problem, feature orientation, product lines, modularity, composition}
}
Document
Crowdsourcing and the Semantic Web (Dagstuhl Seminar 14282)

Authors: Abraham Bernstein, Jan Marco Leimeister, Natasha Noy, Cristina Sarasua, and Elena Simperl


Abstract
Semantic technologies provide flexible and scalable solutions to master and make sense of an increasingly vast and complex data landscape. However, while this potential has been acknowledged for various application scenarios and domains, and a number of success stories exist, it is equally clear that the development and deployment of semantic technologies will always remain reliant of human input and intervention. This is due to the very nature of some of the tasks associated with the semantic data management life cycle, which are famous for their knowledge-intensive and/or context-specific character; examples range from conceptual modeling in almost any flavor, to labeling resources (in different languages), describing their content in terms of ontological terms, or recognizing similar concepts and entities. For this reason, the Semantic Web community has always looked into applying the latest theories, methods and tools from CSCW (Computer Supported Cooperative Work), participatory design, Web 2.0, social computing, and, more recently crowdsourcing to find ways to engage with users and encourage their involvement in the execution of technical tasks. Existing approaches include the usage of wikis as semantic content authoring environments, leveraging folksonomies to create formal ontologies, but also human computation approaches such as games with a purpose or micro-tasks. This document provides a summary of the Dagstuhl Seminar 14282: Crowdsourcing and the Semantic Web, which in July 2014 brought together researchers of the emerging scientific community at the intersection of crowdsourcing and Semantic Web technologies. We collect the position statements written by the participants of seminar, which played a central role in the discussions about the evolution of our research field.

Cite as

Abraham Bernstein, Jan Marco Leimeister, Natasha Noy, Cristina Sarasua, and Elena Simperl. Crowdsourcing and the Semantic Web (Dagstuhl Seminar 14282). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 7, pp. 25-51, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{bernstein_et_al:DagRep.4.7.25,
  author =	{Bernstein, Abraham and Leimeister, Jan Marco and Noy, Natasha and Sarasua, Cristina and Simperl, Elena},
  title =	{{Crowdsourcing and the Semantic Web (Dagstuhl Seminar 14282)}},
  pages =	{25--51},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{7},
  editor =	{Bernstein, Abraham and Leimeister, Jan Marco and Noy, Natasha and Sarasua, Cristina and Simperl, Elena},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.7.25},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-47845},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.7.25},
  annote =	{Keywords: Crowdsourcing, Human Computation, Games with a Purpose, Microtask Crowdsourcing, Semantic Web, Linked Data, Quality Assurance, Crowd Management, Work Incentives}
}
Document
Information-Centric Networking 3 (Dagstuhl Seminar 14291)

Authors: Dirk Kutscher, Taekyoung Kwon, and Ignacio Solis


Abstract
This report documents the presentations and discussions of the 3rd Dagstuhl seminar on Information-Centric Networks. This seminar was focused on the deployment and scalability of ICNs. An overview of various ICN projects was used as a starting point for discussions. Participants provided a set of starting questions to cover with the rest of the group. The seminar increased the awareness on the state of the art in ICN research. Various topics on deployment and scalability were discussed. The opinions and comments presented here came directly from the notes taken at the seminar.

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Dirk Kutscher, Taekyoung Kwon, and Ignacio Solis. Information-Centric Networking 3 (Dagstuhl Seminar 14291). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 7, pp. 52-61, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{kutscher_et_al:DagRep.4.7.52,
  author =	{Kutscher, Dirk and Kwon, Taekyoung and Solis, Ignacio},
  title =	{{Information-Centric Networking 3 (Dagstuhl Seminar 14291)}},
  pages =	{52--61},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{7},
  editor =	{Kutscher, Dirk and Kwon, Taekyoung and Solis, Ignacio},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.7.52},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-47854},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.7.52},
  annote =	{Keywords: Information-Centric, Content-Centric, Name-Based, Content-Based, Networks}
}
Document
Network Attack Detection and Defense: Securing Industrial Control Systems for Critical Infrastructures (Dagstuhl Seminar 14292)

Authors: Marc Dacier, Frank Kargl, Hartmut König, and Alfonso Valdes


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 14292 "Network Attack Detection and Defense: Securing Industrial Control Systems for Critical Infrastructures". The main objective of the seminar was to discuss new approaches and ideas for securing industrial control systems. It is the sequel of several previous Dagstuhl seminars: (1) the series "Network Attack Detection and Defense" held in 2008 and 2012, and (2) the Dagstuhl seminar "Securing Critical Infrastructures from Targeted Attacks", held in 2012. At the seminar, which brought together members from academia an industry, appropriate methods for detecting attacks on industrial control systems (ICSs) and for limiting the impact on the physical components were considered. A central question was whether and how reactive security mechanisms can be made more ICS- and process-aware. To some extent it seems possible to adopt existing security approaches from other areas (e.g., conventional networks, embedded systems, or sensor networks). The main question is whether adopting these approaches is sufficient to reach the desired level of security for ICSs. Detecting attacks to the physical components and appropriate reactions to attacks are new aspects that need to be considered as well. The main result of the seminar is a list of recommendations for future directions in ICS security that is presented in this report.

Cite as

Marc Dacier, Frank Kargl, Hartmut König, and Alfonso Valdes. Network Attack Detection and Defense: Securing Industrial Control Systems for Critical Infrastructures (Dagstuhl Seminar 14292). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 7, pp. 62-79, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{dacier_et_al:DagRep.4.7.62,
  author =	{Dacier, Marc and Kargl, Frank and K\"{o}nig, Hartmut and Valdes, Alfonso},
  title =	{{Network Attack Detection and Defense: Securing Industrial Control Systems for Critical Infrastructures (Dagstuhl Seminar 14292)}},
  pages =	{62--79},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{7},
  editor =	{Dacier, Marc and Kargl, Frank and K\"{o}nig, Hartmut and Valdes, Alfonso},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.7.62},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-47912},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.7.62},
  annote =	{Keywords: Security, Intrusion Detection, Critical Infrastructures, Industrial Control Systems, SCADA, Vulnerability Analysis, Malware Assessment, Attack Response and Countermeasures}
}
Document
Computational Humanities - bridging the gap between Computer Science and Digital Humanities (Dagstuhl Seminar 14301)

Authors: Chris Biemann, Gregory R. Crane, Christiane D. Fellbaum, and Alexander Mehler


Abstract
Research in the field of Digital Humanities, also known as Humanities Computing, has seen a steady increase over the past years. Situated at the intersection of computing science and the humanities, present efforts focus on making resources such as texts, images, musical pieces and other semiotic artifacts digitally available, searchable and analysable. To this end, computational tools enabling textual search, visual analytics, data mining, statistics and natural language processing are harnessed to support the humanities researcher. The processing of large data sets with appropriate software opens up novel and fruitful approaches to questions in the traditional humanities. This report summarizes the Dagstuhl seminar 14301 on "Computational Humanities - bridging the gap between Computer Science and Digital Humanities".

Cite as

Chris Biemann, Gregory R. Crane, Christiane D. Fellbaum, and Alexander Mehler. Computational Humanities - bridging the gap between Computer Science and Digital Humanities (Dagstuhl Seminar 14301). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 7, pp. 80-111, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{biemann_et_al:DagRep.4.7.80,
  author =	{Biemann, Chris and Crane, Gregory R. and Fellbaum, Christiane D. and Mehler, Alexander},
  title =	{{Computational Humanities - bridging the gap between Computer Science and Digital Humanities (Dagstuhl Seminar 14301)}},
  pages =	{80--111},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{7},
  editor =	{Biemann, Chris and Crane, Gregory R. and Fellbaum, Christiane D. and Mehler, Alexander},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.7.80},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-47929},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.7.80},
  annote =	{Keywords: Computer Science, Digital Humanities, Computational Humanities, eHumanities, Big Data, Experimental Methods}
}
Document
Digital Palaeography: New Machines and Old Texts (Dagstuhl Seminar 14302)

Authors: Tal Hassner, Robert Sablatnig, Dominique Stutzmann, and Ségolène Tarte


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 14302 "Digital Palaeography: New Machines and Old Texts", which focused on the nteraction of Palaeography and computerized tools developed in Computer Vision for the analysis of digital images. This seminar intertwined research reports from the most advanced teams in the field and interdisciplinary discussions on the potentials and limitations of future research and the establishment of a community of practice in Digital Palaeography. It resulted in new research directions in the Computer Sciences and new research strategies in Palaeography and in a better understanding of how to conduct interdisciplinary research across all the fields of expertise involved in Digital Palaeography.

Cite as

Tal Hassner, Robert Sablatnig, Dominique Stutzmann, and Ségolène Tarte. Digital Palaeography: New Machines and Old Texts (Dagstuhl Seminar 14302). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 7, pp. 112-134, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{hassner_et_al:DagRep.4.7.112,
  author =	{Hassner, Tal and Sablatnig, Robert and Stutzmann, Dominique and Tarte, S\'{e}gol\`{e}ne},
  title =	{{Digital Palaeography: New Machines and Old Texts (Dagstuhl Seminar 14302)}},
  pages =	{112--134},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{7},
  editor =	{Hassner, Tal and Sablatnig, Robert and Stutzmann, Dominique and Tarte, S\'{e}gol\`{e}ne},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.7.112},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-47938},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.7.112},
  annote =	{Keywords: Handwriting Recognition, Interdisciplinarity, Epistemology, Middle Ages, Manuscript studies, Expertise, Knowledge exchange}
}

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