Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 7



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Complete Issue
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 7, July 2019, Complete Issue

Abstract
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 7, July 2019, Complete Issue

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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 7, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2020)


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@Article{DagRep.9.7,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 7, July 2019, Complete Issue}},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2020},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{7},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.7},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-118378},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.7},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 7, July 2019, Complete Issue}
}
Document
Front Matter
Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 9, Issue 7, 2019

Abstract
Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 9, Issue 7, 2019

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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 7, pp. i-ii, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2020)


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@Article{DagRep.9.7.i,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 9, Issue 7, 2019}},
  pages =	{i--ii},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2020},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{7},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.7.i},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-118386},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.7.i},
  annote =	{Keywords: Table of Contents, Frontmatter}
}
Document
Notional Machines and Programming Language Semantics in Education (Dagstuhl Seminar 19281)

Authors: Mark Guzdial, Shriram Krishnamurthi, Juha Sorva, and Jan Vahrenhold


Abstract
A formal semantics of a language serves many purposes. It can help debug the language's design, be used to prove type soundness, and guide optimizers to confirm that their work is correctness-preserving. Formal semantics are evaluated by several criteria: full abstraction, adequacy, soundness and completeness, faithfulness to an underlying implementation, and so on. Unfortunately, we know relatively little about how non-experts, such as students, actually employ a semantics. Which models are they able to grasp? How useful are these as they explain or debug programs? How does their use of models evolve with the kinds of programs they write? And does studying these kinds of questions yield any new insights into forms of semantics? This Dagstuhl Seminar intended to bridge this gap. It brought together representatives of the two communities-who usually travel in non-intersecting circles-to enable mutual understanding and cross-pollination. The Programming Languages community uses mathematics and focuses on formal results; the Computing Education Research community uses social science methods and focuses on the impact on humans. Neither is superior: both are needed to arrive at a comprehensive solution to creating tools for learning.

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Mark Guzdial, Shriram Krishnamurthi, Juha Sorva, and Jan Vahrenhold. Notional Machines and Programming Language Semantics in Education (Dagstuhl Seminar 19281). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 7, pp. 1-23, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{guzdial_et_al:DagRep.9.7.1,
  author =	{Guzdial, Mark and Krishnamurthi, Shriram and Sorva, Juha and Vahrenhold, Jan},
  title =	{{Notional Machines and Programming Language Semantics in Education (Dagstuhl Seminar 19281)}},
  pages =	{1--23},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{7},
  editor =	{Guzdial, Mark and Krishnamurthi, Shriram and Sorva, Juha and Vahrenhold, Jan},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.7.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-116272},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.7.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: computing education research, formal semantics, misconceptions, notional machines}
}
Document
Data Series Management (Dagstuhl Seminar 19282)

Authors: Anthony Bagnall, Richard L. Cole, Themis Palpanas, and Kostas Zoumpatianos


Abstract
We now witness a very strong interest by users across different domains on data series (a.k.a. time series) management. It is not unusual for industrial applications that produce data series to involve numbers of sequences (or subsequences) in the order of billions (i.e., multiple TBs). As a result, analysts are unable to handle the vast amounts of data series that they have to manage and process. The goal of this seminar is to enable researchers and practitioners to exchange ideas and foster collaborations in the topic of data series management and identify the corresponding open research directions. The main questions answered are the following: i) What are the data series management needs across various domains and what are the shortcomings of current systems, ii) How can we use machine learning to optimize our current data systems, and how can these systems help in machine learning pipelines? iii) How can visual analytics assist the process of analyzing big data series collections? The seminar focuses on the following key topics related to data series management: 1)Data series storage and access paterns, 2) Query optimization, 3) Machine learning and data mining for data serie, 4) Visualization for data series exploration, 5) Applications in multiple domains.

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Anthony Bagnall, Richard L. Cole, Themis Palpanas, and Kostas Zoumpatianos. Data Series Management (Dagstuhl Seminar 19282). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 7, pp. 24-39, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{bagnall_et_al:DagRep.9.7.24,
  author =	{Bagnall, Anthony and Cole, Richard L. and Palpanas, Themis and Zoumpatianos, Kostas},
  title =	{{Data Series Management (Dagstuhl Seminar 19282)}},
  pages =	{24--39},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{7},
  editor =	{Bagnall, Anthony and Cole, Richard L. and Palpanas, Themis and Zoumpatianos, Kostas},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.7.24},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-116349},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.7.24},
  annote =	{Keywords: data series; time series; sequences; management; indexing; analytics; machine learning; mining; visualization}
}
Document
Values in Computing (Dagstuhl Seminar 19291)

Authors: Christoph Becker, Gregor Engels, Andrew Feenberg, Maria Angela Ferrario, and Geraldine Fitzpatrick


Abstract
Values are deeply held principles guiding decisions of individuals, groups and organizations. Computing technologies are inevitably affected by values: through their design, values become embodied and enacted. However, some values are easier to quantify and articulate than others; for example, the financial value of a software product is easier to measure than its `fairness'. As a result, less measurable values are often dismissed in decision making processes as lacking evidence. This is particularly problematic since research shows that less measurable values tend to be more strongly associated with sustainable practices than easier to quantify ones; it also indicates that the systems we design are likely to be inadequate for tackling long-term complex societal problems such as environmental change and health-related challenges that so often computing technologies are asked to address. This seminar aims to examine the complex relations between values, computing technologies and society. It does so by bringing together practitioners and researchers from several areas within and beyond computer science, including human computer interaction, software engineering, computer ethics, moral philosophy, philosophy of technology, data science and critical data studies. The outcomes include concrete cases examined through diverse disciplinary perspectives and guidelines for values in computing research, development and education, which are expressed in this report.

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Christoph Becker, Gregor Engels, Andrew Feenberg, Maria Angela Ferrario, and Geraldine Fitzpatrick. Values in Computing (Dagstuhl Seminar 19291). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 7, pp. 40-77, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{becker_et_al:DagRep.9.7.40,
  author =	{Becker, Christoph and Engels, Gregor and Feenberg, Andrew and Ferrario, Maria Angela and Fitzpatrick, Geraldine},
  title =	{{Values in Computing (Dagstuhl Seminar 19291)}},
  pages =	{40--77},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{7},
  editor =	{Becker, Christoph and Engels, Gregor and Feenberg, Andrew and Ferrario, Maria Angela and Fitzpatrick, Geraldine},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.7.40},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-116358},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.7.40},
  annote =	{Keywords: computing in society, responsible innovation, sustainability informatics computer ethics, philosophy of technology and moral philosophy}
}
Document
Mobile Data Visualization (Dagstuhl Seminar 19292)

Authors: Eun Kyoung Choe, Raimund Dachselt, Petra Isenberg, and Bongshin Lee


Abstract
Mobile visualization is becoming more prevalent, and new mobile device form factors and hardware capabilities will continually emerge in the coming years. Therefore, it is timely to reflect on what has been discovered to date and to look into the future. This Dagstuhl seminar brought together both established and junior researchers, designers, and practitioners from relevant application and research fields, including visualization, ubiquitous computing, human-computer interaction, and health informatics. Five demos and five tutorials gave participants an opportunity to share their experiences and research, and learn skills relevant to mobile data visualization. Through brainstorming and discussion in break-out sessions, along with short report back presentations, participants identified challenges and opportunities for future research on mobile data visualization.

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Eun Kyoung Choe, Raimund Dachselt, Petra Isenberg, and Bongshin Lee. Mobile Data Visualization (Dagstuhl Seminar 19292). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 7, pp. 78-93, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{choe_et_al:DagRep.9.7.78,
  author =	{Choe, Eun Kyoung and Dachselt, Raimund and Isenberg, Petra and Lee, Bongshin},
  title =	{{Mobile Data Visualization (Dagstuhl Seminar 19292)}},
  pages =	{78--93},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{7},
  editor =	{Choe, Eun Kyoung and Dachselt, Raimund and Isenberg, Petra and Lee, Bongshin},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.7.78},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-116362},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.7.78},
  annote =	{Keywords: Data visualization, Human-computer interaction, Information visualization, Mobile computing, Ubiquitous computing}
}
Document
Secure Composition for Hardware Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 19301)

Authors: Divya Arora, Ilia Polian, Francesco Regazzoni, and Patrick Schaumont


Abstract
The goal of the Dagstuhl Seminar 19301 ``Secure Composition for Hardware System'' was to establish a common understanding of principles and techniques that can facilitate composition and integration of hardware systems to achieve specified security guarantees. Theoretical foundations of secure composition have been laid out in the past, but they are limited to software systems. New and unique security challenges arise when a real system composed of a range of hardware components, including application-specific blocks, programmable microcontrollers, and reconfigurable fabrics, are put together. For example, these components may have different owners, different trust assumptions and may not even have a common language to describe their security properties to each other. Physical and side-channel attacks that take advantage of various physical properties to undermine a system's security objectives add another level of complexity to the secure composition problem. Moreover, practical hardware systems include software of tremendous size and complexity, and hardware-software interaction can create new security challenges. The seminar considered secure composition both from a pure hardware perspective, where multiple hardware blocks are composed in, e.g., a system on chip (SoC), and from a hardware-software perspective where hardware is integrated within a system that includes software. The seminar brought together researchers and industry practitioners from fields that have to deal with secure composition: Secure hardware architectures, hardware-oriented security, applied cryptography, test and verification of security properties. By involving industrial participants, we were able to get insights on real-world challenges, heuristics, and methodologies employed to address them and initiate a discussion towards new solutions.

Cite as

Divya Arora, Ilia Polian, Francesco Regazzoni, and Patrick Schaumont. Secure Composition for Hardware Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 19301). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 7, pp. 94-116, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{arora_et_al:DagRep.9.7.94,
  author =	{Arora, Divya and Polian, Ilia and Regazzoni, Francesco and Schaumont, Patrick},
  title =	{{Secure Composition for Hardware Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 19301)}},
  pages =	{94--116},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{7},
  editor =	{Arora, Divya and Polian, Ilia and Regazzoni, Francesco and Schaumont, Patrick},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.7.94},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-116377},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.7.94},
  annote =	{Keywords: Hardware, Secure composition, Security, Software}
}
Document
Cybersafety Threats - from Deception to Aggression (Dagstuhl Seminar 19302)

Authors: Zinaida Benenson, Marianne Junger, Daniela Oliveira, and Gianluca Stringhini


Abstract
A number of malicious activities, such as cyberbullying, disinformation, and phishing, are becoming increasingly serious, affecting the wellbeing of Internet users both financially and psychologically. These malicious activities are inherently socio-technical, and therefore effective countermeasures against them must draw not only from engineering and computer science, but also from other disciplines. To discuss these topics and find appropriate countermeasures, we assembled a group of researchers from a number of disciplines such as computer science, criminology, crime science, psychology, and education. Through five days of brainstorming and discussion, the participants developed a roadmap for future research on these topics, along four directions: modelling the attackers, measuring human behavior, detection and prevention approaches for online threats to adolescents, and understanding unintended consequences of mitigation techniques.

Cite as

Zinaida Benenson, Marianne Junger, Daniela Oliveira, and Gianluca Stringhini. Cybersafety Threats - from Deception to Aggression (Dagstuhl Seminar 19302). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 7, pp. 117-154, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{benenson_et_al:DagRep.9.7.117,
  author =	{Benenson, Zinaida and Junger, Marianne and Oliveira, Daniela and Stringhini, Gianluca},
  title =	{{Cybersafety Threats - from Deception to Aggression (Dagstuhl Seminar 19302)}},
  pages =	{117--154},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{7},
  editor =	{Benenson, Zinaida and Junger, Marianne and Oliveira, Daniela and Stringhini, Gianluca},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.7.117},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-116387},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.7.117},
  annote =	{Keywords: Cybersafety, Legal and Ethical Issues on the Web, Online Social Networks, Security and Privacy}
}

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