4 Search Results for "Dieudonné, Yoann"


Document
Track A: Algorithms, Complexity and Games
Almost-Optimal Deterministic Treasure Hunt in Arbitrary Graphs

Authors: Sébastien Bouchard, Yoann Dieudonné, Arnaud Labourel, and Andrzej Pelc

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 198, 48th International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2021)


Abstract
A mobile agent navigating along edges of a simple connected graph, either finite or countably infinite, has to find an inert target (treasure) hidden in one of the nodes. This task is known as treasure hunt. The agent has no a priori knowledge of the graph, of the location of the treasure or of the initial distance to it. The cost of a treasure hunt algorithm is the worst-case number of edge traversals performed by the agent until finding the treasure. Awerbuch, Betke, Rivest and Singh [Baruch Awerbuch et al., 1999] considered graph exploration and treasure hunt for finite graphs in a restricted model where the agent has a fuel tank that can be replenished only at the starting node s. The size of the tank is B = 2(1+α)r, for some positive real constant α, where r, called the radius of the graph, is the maximum distance from s to any other node. The tank of size B allows the agent to make at most {⌊ B⌋} edge traversals between two consecutive visits at node s. Let e(d) be the number of edges whose at least one extremity is at distance less than d from s. Awerbuch, Betke, Rivest and Singh [Baruch Awerbuch et al., 1999] conjectured that it is impossible to find a treasure hidden in a node at distance at most d at cost nearly linear in e(d). We first design a deterministic treasure hunt algorithm working in the model without any restrictions on the moves of the agent at cost 𝒪(e(d) log d), and then show how to modify this algorithm to work in the model from [Baruch Awerbuch et al., 1999] with the same complexity. Thus we refute the above twenty-year-old conjecture. We observe that no treasure hunt algorithm can beat cost Θ(e(d)) for all graphs and thus our algorithms are also almost optimal.

Cite as

Sébastien Bouchard, Yoann Dieudonné, Arnaud Labourel, and Andrzej Pelc. Almost-Optimal Deterministic Treasure Hunt in Arbitrary Graphs. In 48th International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2021). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 198, pp. 36:1-36:20, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2021)


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@InProceedings{bouchard_et_al:LIPIcs.ICALP.2021.36,
  author =	{Bouchard, S\'{e}bastien and Dieudonn\'{e}, Yoann and Labourel, Arnaud and Pelc, Andrzej},
  title =	{{Almost-Optimal Deterministic Treasure Hunt in Arbitrary Graphs}},
  booktitle =	{48th International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2021)},
  pages =	{36:1--36:20},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-195-5},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2021},
  volume =	{198},
  editor =	{Bansal, Nikhil and Merelli, Emanuela and Worrell, James},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ICALP.2021.36},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-141051},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ICALP.2021.36},
  annote =	{Keywords: treasure hunt, graph, mobile agent}
}
Document
Deterministic Treasure Hunt in the Plane with Angular Hints

Authors: Sébastien Bouchard, Yoann Dieudonné, Andrzej Pelc, and Franck Petit

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 123, 29th International Symposium on Algorithms and Computation (ISAAC 2018)


Abstract
A mobile agent equipped with a compass and a measure of length has to find an inert treasure in the Euclidean plane. Both the agent and the treasure are modeled as points. In the beginning, the agent is at a distance at most D>0 from the treasure, but knows neither the distance nor any bound on it. Finding the treasure means getting at distance at most 1 from it. The agent makes a series of moves. Each of them consists in moving straight in a chosen direction at a chosen distance. In the beginning and after each move the agent gets a hint consisting of a positive angle smaller than 2 pi whose vertex is at the current position of the agent and within which the treasure is contained. We investigate the problem of how these hints permit the agent to lower the cost of finding the treasure, using a deterministic algorithm, where the cost is the worst-case total length of the agent's trajectory. It is well known that without any hint the optimal (worst case) cost is Theta(D^2). We show that if all angles given as hints are at most pi, then the cost can be lowered to O(D), which is optimal. If all angles are at most beta, where beta<2 pi is a constant unknown to the agent, then the cost is at most O(D^{2-epsilon}), for some epsilon>0. For both these positive results we present deterministic algorithms achieving the above costs. Finally, if angles given as hints can be arbitrary, smaller than 2 pi, then we show that cost Theta(D^2) cannot be beaten.

Cite as

Sébastien Bouchard, Yoann Dieudonné, Andrzej Pelc, and Franck Petit. Deterministic Treasure Hunt in the Plane with Angular Hints. In 29th International Symposium on Algorithms and Computation (ISAAC 2018). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 123, pp. 48:1-48:13, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@InProceedings{bouchard_et_al:LIPIcs.ISAAC.2018.48,
  author =	{Bouchard, S\'{e}bastien and Dieudonn\'{e}, Yoann and Pelc, Andrzej and Petit, Franck},
  title =	{{Deterministic Treasure Hunt in the Plane with Angular Hints}},
  booktitle =	{29th International Symposium on Algorithms and Computation (ISAAC 2018)},
  pages =	{48:1--48:13},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-094-1},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{123},
  editor =	{Hsu, Wen-Lian and Lee, Der-Tsai and Liao, Chung-Shou},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ISAAC.2018.48},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-99964},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ISAAC.2018.48},
  annote =	{Keywords: treasure hunt, deterministic algorithm, mobile agent, hint, plane}
}
Document
Byzantine Gathering in Polynomial Time

Authors: Sébastien Bouchard, Yoann Dieudonné, and Anissa Lamani

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 107, 45th International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2018)


Abstract
Gathering a group of mobile agents is a fundamental task in the field of distributed and mobile systems. This can be made drastically more difficult to achieve when some agents are subject to faults, especially the Byzantine ones that are known as being the worst faults to handle. In this paper we study, from a deterministic point of view, the task of Byzantine gathering in a network modeled as a graph. In other words, despite the presence of Byzantine agents, all the other (good) agents, starting from {possibly} different nodes and applying the same deterministic algorithm, have to meet at the same node in finite time and stop moving. An adversary chooses the initial nodes of the agents (the number of agents may be larger than the number of nodes) and assigns a different positive integer (called label) to each of them. Initially, each agent knows its label. The agents move in synchronous rounds and can communicate with each other only when located at the same node. Within the team, f of the agents are Byzantine. A Byzantine agent acts in an unpredictable and arbitrary way. For example, it can choose an arbitrary port when it moves, can convey arbitrary information to other agents and can change its label in every round, in particular by forging the label of another agent or by creating a completely new one. Besides its label, which corresponds to a local knowledge, an agent is assigned some global knowledge denoted by GK that is common to all agents. In literature, the Byzantine gathering problem has been analyzed in arbitrary n-node graphs by considering the scenario when GK=(n,f) and the scenario when GK=f. In the first (resp. second) scenario, it has been shown that the minimum number of good agents guaranteeing deterministic gathering of all of them is f+1 (resp. f+2). However, for both these scenarios, all the existing deterministic algorithms, whether or not they are optimal in terms of required number of good agents, have the major disadvantage of having a time complexity that is exponential in n and L, where L is the value of the largest label belonging to a good agent. In this paper, we seek to design a deterministic solution for Byzantine gathering that makes a concession on the proportion of Byzantine agents within the team, but that offers a significantly lower complexity. We also seek to use a global knowledge whose the length of the binary representation (that we also call size) is small. In this respect, assuming that the agents are in a strong team i.e., a team in which the number of good agents is at least some prescribed value that is quadratic in f, we give positive and negative results. On the positive side, we show an algorithm that solves Byzantine gathering with all strong teams in all graphs of size at most n, for any integers n and f, in a time polynomial in n and the length |l_{min}| of the binary representation of the smallest label of a good agent. The algorithm works using a global knowledge of size O(log log log n), which is of optimal order of magnitude in our context to reach a time complexity that is polynomial in n and |l_{min}|. Indeed, on the negative side, we show that there is no deterministic algorithm solving Byzantine gathering with all strong teams, in all graphs of size at most n, in a time polynomial in n and |l_{min}| and using a global knowledge of size o(log log log n).

Cite as

Sébastien Bouchard, Yoann Dieudonné, and Anissa Lamani. Byzantine Gathering in Polynomial Time. In 45th International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2018). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 107, pp. 147:1-147:15, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@InProceedings{bouchard_et_al:LIPIcs.ICALP.2018.147,
  author =	{Bouchard, S\'{e}bastien and Dieudonn\'{e}, Yoann and Lamani, Anissa},
  title =	{{Byzantine Gathering in Polynomial Time}},
  booktitle =	{45th International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2018)},
  pages =	{147:1--147:15},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-076-7},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{107},
  editor =	{Chatzigiannakis, Ioannis and Kaklamanis, Christos and Marx, D\'{a}niel and Sannella, Donald},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ICALP.2018.147},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-91511},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ICALP.2018.147},
  annote =	{Keywords: gathering, deterministic algorithm, mobile agent, Byzantine fault, polynomial time}
}
Document
Asynchronous Approach in the Plane: A Deterministic Polynomial Algorithm

Authors: Sébastien Bouchard, Marjorie Bournat, Yoann Dieudonné, Swan Dubois, and Franck Petit

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 91, 31st International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2017)


Abstract
In this paper we study the task of approach of two mobile agents having the same limited range of vision and moving asynchronously in the plane. This task consists in getting them in finite time within each other's range of vision. The agents execute the same deterministic algorithm and are assumed to have a compass showing the cardinal directions as well as a unit measure. On the other hand, they do not share any global coordinates system (like GPS), cannot communicate and have distinct labels. Each agent knows its label but does not know the label of the other agent or the initial position of the other agent relative to its own. The route of an agent is a sequence of segments that are subsequently traversed in order to achieve approach. For each agent, the computation of its route depends only on its algorithm and its label. An adversary chooses the initial positions of both agents in the plane and controls the way each of them moves along every segment of the routes, in particular by arbitrarily varying the speeds of the agents. Roughly speaking, the goal of the adversary is to prevent the agents from solving the task, or at least to ensure that the agents have covered as much distance as possible before seeing each other. A deterministic approach algorithm is a deterministic algorithm that always allows two agents with any distinct labels to solve the task of approach regardless of the choices and the behavior of the adversary. The cost of a complete execution of an approach algorithm is the length of both parts of route travelled by the agents until approach is completed. Let Delta and l be the initial distance separating the agents and the length of (the binary representation of) the shortest label, respectively. Assuming that Delta and l are unknown to both agents, does there exist a deterministic approach algorithm whose cost is polynomial in Delta and l? Actually the problem of approach in the plane reduces to the network problem of rendezvous in an infinite oriented grid, which consists in ensuring that both agents end up meeting at the same time at a node or on an edge of the grid. By designing such a rendezvous algorithm with appropriate properties, as we do in this paper, we provide a positive answer to the above question. Our result turns out to be an important step forward from a computational point of view, as the other algorithms allowing to solve the same problem either have an exponential cost in the initial separating distance and in the labels of the agents, or require each agent to know its starting position in a global system of coordinates, or only work under a much less powerful adversary.

Cite as

Sébastien Bouchard, Marjorie Bournat, Yoann Dieudonné, Swan Dubois, and Franck Petit. Asynchronous Approach in the Plane: A Deterministic Polynomial Algorithm. In 31st International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2017). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 91, pp. 8:1-8:16, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@InProceedings{bouchard_et_al:LIPIcs.DISC.2017.8,
  author =	{Bouchard, S\'{e}bastien and Bournat, Marjorie and Dieudonn\'{e}, Yoann and Dubois, Swan and Petit, Franck},
  title =	{{Asynchronous Approach in the Plane: A Deterministic Polynomial Algorithm}},
  booktitle =	{31st International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2017)},
  pages =	{8:1--8:16},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-053-8},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{91},
  editor =	{Richa, Andr\'{e}a},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.DISC.2017.8},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-79631},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.DISC.2017.8},
  annote =	{Keywords: mobile agents, asynchronous rendezvous, plane, infinite grid, deterministic algorithm, polynomial cost}
}
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