6 Search Results for "Hendler, Danny"


Document
Position
Standardizing Knowledge Engineering Practices with a Reference Architecture

Authors: Bradley P. Allen and Filip Ilievski

Published in: TGDK, Volume 2, Issue 1 (2024): Special Issue on Trends in Graph Data and Knowledge - Part 2. Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge, Volume 2, Issue 1


Abstract
Knowledge engineering is the process of creating and maintaining knowledge-producing systems. Throughout the history of computer science and AI, knowledge engineering workflows have been widely used given the importance of high-quality knowledge for reliable intelligent agents. Meanwhile, the scope of knowledge engineering, as apparent from its target tasks and use cases, has been shifting, together with its paradigms such as expert systems, semantic web, and language modeling. The intended use cases and supported user requirements between these paradigms have not been analyzed globally, as new paradigms often satisfy prior pain points while possibly introducing new ones. The recent abstraction of systemic patterns into a boxology provides an opening for aligning the requirements and use cases of knowledge engineering with the systems, components, and software that can satisfy them best, however, this direction has not been explored to date. This paper proposes a vision of harmonizing the best practices in the field of knowledge engineering by leveraging the software engineering methodology of creating reference architectures. We describe how a reference architecture can be iteratively designed and implemented to associate user needs with recurring systemic patterns, building on top of existing knowledge engineering workflows and boxologies. We provide a six-step roadmap that can enable the development of such an architecture, consisting of scope definition, selection of information sources, architectural analysis, synthesis of an architecture based on the information source analysis, evaluation through instantiation, and, ultimately, instantiation into a concrete software architecture. We provide an initial design and outcome of the definition of architectural scope, selection of information sources, and analysis. As the remaining steps of design, evaluation, and instantiation of the architecture are largely use-case specific, we provide a detailed description of their procedures and point to relevant examples. We expect that following through on this vision will lead to well-grounded reference architectures for knowledge engineering, will advance the ongoing initiatives of organizing the neurosymbolic knowledge engineering space, and will build new links to the software architectures and data science communities.

Cite as

Bradley P. Allen and Filip Ilievski. Standardizing Knowledge Engineering Practices with a Reference Architecture. In Special Issue on Trends in Graph Data and Knowledge - Part 2. Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge (TGDK), Volume 2, Issue 1, pp. 5:1-5:23, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2024)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@Article{allen_et_al:TGDK.2.1.5,
  author =	{Allen, Bradley P. and Ilievski, Filip},
  title =	{{Standardizing Knowledge Engineering Practices with a Reference Architecture}},
  journal =	{Transactions on Graph Data and Knowledge},
  pages =	{5:1--5:23},
  ISSN =	{2942-7517},
  year =	{2024},
  volume =	{2},
  number =	{1},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/TGDK.2.1.5},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-198623},
  doi =		{10.4230/TGDK.2.1.5},
  annote =	{Keywords: knowledge engineering, knowledge graphs, quality attributes, software architectures, sociotechnical systems}
}
Document
Recoverable and Detectable Self-Implementations of Swap

Authors: Tomer Lev Lehman, Hagit Attiya, and Danny Hendler

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 286, 27th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2023)


Abstract
Recoverable algorithms tolerate failures and recoveries of processes by using non-volatile memory. Of particular interest are self-implementations of key operations, in which a recoverable operation is implemented from its non-recoverable counterpart (in addition to reads and writes). This paper presents two self-implementations of the swap operation. One works in the system-wide failures model, where all processes fail and recover together, and the other in the independent failures model, where each process crashes and recovers independently of the other processes. Both algorithms are wait-free in crash-free executions, but their recovery code is blocking. We prove that this is inherent for the independent failures model. The impossibility result is proved for implementations of distinguishable operations using interfering functions, and in particular, it applies to a recoverable self-implementation of swap.

Cite as

Tomer Lev Lehman, Hagit Attiya, and Danny Hendler. Recoverable and Detectable Self-Implementations of Swap. In 27th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2023). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 286, pp. 24:1-24:22, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2024)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@InProceedings{levlehman_et_al:LIPIcs.OPODIS.2023.24,
  author =	{Lev Lehman, Tomer and Attiya, Hagit and Hendler, Danny},
  title =	{{Recoverable and Detectable Self-Implementations of Swap}},
  booktitle =	{27th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2023)},
  pages =	{24:1--24:22},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-308-9},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2024},
  volume =	{286},
  editor =	{Bessani, Alysson and D\'{e}fago, Xavier and Nakamura, Junya and Wada, Koichi and Yamauchi, Yukiko},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.OPODIS.2023.24},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-195140},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.OPODIS.2023.24},
  annote =	{Keywords: Multi-core algorithms, persistent memory, non-volatile memory, recoverable objects, detectablitly}
}
Document
Brief Announcement
Brief Announcement: Recoverable and Detectable Self-Implementations of Swap

Authors: Tomer Lev Lehman, Hagit Attiya, and Danny Hendler

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 281, 37th International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2023)


Abstract
Recoverable algorithms tolerate failures and recoveries of processes by using non-volatile memory. Of particular interest are self-implementations of key operations, in which a recoverable operation is implemented from its non-recoverable counterpart (in addition to reads and writes). This paper presents two self-implementations of the SWAP operation. One works in the system-wide failures model, where all processes fail and recover together, and the other in the independent failures model, where each process crashes and recovers independently of the other processes. Both algorithms are wait-free in crash-free executions, but their recovery code is blocking. We prove that this is inherent for the independent failures model. The impossibility result is proved for implementations of distinguishable operations using interfering functions, and in particular, it applies to a recoverable self-implementation of swap.

Cite as

Tomer Lev Lehman, Hagit Attiya, and Danny Hendler. Brief Announcement: Recoverable and Detectable Self-Implementations of Swap. In 37th International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2023). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 281, pp. 44:1-44:7, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2023)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@InProceedings{levlehman_et_al:LIPIcs.DISC.2023.44,
  author =	{Lev Lehman, Tomer and Attiya, Hagit and Hendler, Danny},
  title =	{{Brief Announcement: Recoverable and Detectable Self-Implementations of Swap}},
  booktitle =	{37th International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2023)},
  pages =	{44:1--44:7},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-301-0},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2023},
  volume =	{281},
  editor =	{Oshman, Rotem},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.DISC.2023.44},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-191704},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.DISC.2023.44},
  annote =	{Keywords: Persistent memory, non-volatile memory, recoverable objects, detectablitly}
}
Document
Recoverable and Detectable Fetch&Add

Authors: Liad Nahum, Hagit Attiya, Ohad Ben-Baruch, and Danny Hendler

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 217, 25th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2021)


Abstract
The emergence of systems with non-volatile main memory (NVRAM) increases the need for persistent concurrent objects. Of specific interest are recoverable implementations that, in addition to being robust to crash-failures, are also detectable. Detectability ensures that upon recovery, it is possible to infer whether the failed operation took effect or not and, in the former case, obtain its response. This work presents two recoverable detectable Fetch&Add (FAA) algorithms that are self-implementations, i.e, use only a fetch&add base object, in addition to read/write registers. The algorithms target two different models for recovery: the global-crash model and the individual-crash model. In both algorithms, operations are wait-free when there are no crashes, but the recovery code may block if there are repeated failures. We also prove that in the individual-crash model, there is no implementation of recoverable and detectable FAA using only read, write and fetch&add primitives in which all operations, including recovery, are lock-free.

Cite as

Liad Nahum, Hagit Attiya, Ohad Ben-Baruch, and Danny Hendler. Recoverable and Detectable Fetch&Add. In 25th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2021). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 217, pp. 29:1-29:17, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@InProceedings{nahum_et_al:LIPIcs.OPODIS.2021.29,
  author =	{Nahum, Liad and Attiya, Hagit and Ben-Baruch, Ohad and Hendler, Danny},
  title =	{{Recoverable and Detectable Fetch\&Add}},
  booktitle =	{25th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2021)},
  pages =	{29:1--29:17},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-219-8},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{217},
  editor =	{Bramas, Quentin and Gramoli, Vincent and Milani, Alessia},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.OPODIS.2021.29},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-158043},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.OPODIS.2021.29},
  annote =	{Keywords: Multi-core algorithms, persistent memory, non-volatile memory}
}
Document
Long-Lived Counters with Polylogarithmic Amortized Step Complexity

Authors: Mirza Ahad Baig, Danny Hendler, Alessia Milani, and Corentin Travers

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 146, 33rd International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2019)


Abstract
A shared-memory counter is a well-studied and widely-used concurrent object. It supports two operations: An Inc operation that increases its value by 1 and a Read operation that returns its current value. Jayanti, Tan and Toueg [Jayanti et al., 2000] proved a linear lower bound on the worst-case step complexity of obstruction-free implementations, from read and write operations, of a large class of shared objects that includes counters. The lower bound leaves open the question of finding counter implementations with sub-linear amortized step complexity. In this paper, we address this gap. We present the first wait-free n-process counter, implemented using only read and write operations, whose amortized operation step complexity is O(log^2 n) in all executions. This is the first non-blocking read/write counter algorithm that provides sub-linear amortized step complexity in executions of arbitrary length. Since a logarithmic lower bound on the amortized step complexity of obstruction-free counter implementations exists, our upper bound is optimal up to a logarithmic factor.

Cite as

Mirza Ahad Baig, Danny Hendler, Alessia Milani, and Corentin Travers. Long-Lived Counters with Polylogarithmic Amortized Step Complexity. In 33rd International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 146, pp. 3:1-3:16, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@InProceedings{baig_et_al:LIPIcs.DISC.2019.3,
  author =	{Baig, Mirza Ahad and Hendler, Danny and Milani, Alessia and Travers, Corentin},
  title =	{{Long-Lived Counters with Polylogarithmic Amortized Step Complexity}},
  booktitle =	{33rd International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2019)},
  pages =	{3:1--3:16},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-126-9},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{146},
  editor =	{Suomela, Jukka},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.DISC.2019.3},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-113108},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.DISC.2019.3},
  annote =	{Keywords: Shared Memory, Wait-freedom, Counter, Amortized Complexity, Concurrent Objects}
}
Document
Nontrivial and Universal Helping for Wait-Free Queues and Stacks

Authors: Hagit Attiya, Armando Castaneda, and Danny Hendler

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 46, 19th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2015)


Abstract
This paper studies two approaches to formalize helping in wait-free implementations of shared objects. The first approach is based on operation valency, and it allows us to make the important distinction between trivial and nontrivial helping. We show that a wait-free implementation of a queue from common2 objects (e.g., Test&Set) requires nontrivial helping. In contrast, there is a wait-free implementation of a stack from Common2 objects with only trivial helping. This separation might shed light on the difficulty of implementing a queue from Common2 objects. The other approach formalizes the helping mechanism employed by Herlihy's universal wait-free construction and is based on having an operation by one process restrict the possible linearizations of operations by other processes. We show that objects possessing such universal helping can be used to solve consensus.

Cite as

Hagit Attiya, Armando Castaneda, and Danny Hendler. Nontrivial and Universal Helping for Wait-Free Queues and Stacks. In 19th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2015). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 46, pp. 31:1-31:16, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2016)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@InProceedings{attiya_et_al:LIPIcs.OPODIS.2015.31,
  author =	{Attiya, Hagit and Castaneda, Armando and Hendler, Danny},
  title =	{{Nontrivial and Universal Helping for Wait-Free Queues and Stacks}},
  booktitle =	{19th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2015)},
  pages =	{31:1--31:16},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-98-9},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2016},
  volume =	{46},
  editor =	{Anceaume, Emmanuelle and Cachin, Christian and Potop-Butucaru, Maria},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.OPODIS.2015.31},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-66201},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.OPODIS.2015.31},
  annote =	{Keywords: helping, wait-free, nonblocking, queues, stacks, common2}
}
  • Refine by Author
  • 5 Hendler, Danny
  • 4 Attiya, Hagit
  • 2 Lev Lehman, Tomer
  • 1 Allen, Bradley P.
  • 1 Baig, Mirza Ahad
  • Show More...

  • Refine by Classification
  • 4 Theory of computation → Shared memory algorithms
  • 1 Computing methodologies → Knowledge representation and reasoning
  • 1 Software and its engineering → Software architectures
  • 1 Theory of computation → Concurrent algorithms

  • Refine by Keyword
  • 3 non-volatile memory
  • 2 Multi-core algorithms
  • 2 detectablitly
  • 2 persistent memory
  • 2 recoverable objects
  • Show More...

  • Refine by Type
  • 6 document

  • Refine by Publication Year
  • 2 2024
  • 1 2016
  • 1 2019
  • 1 2022
  • 1 2023

Questions / Remarks / Feedback
X

Feedback for Dagstuhl Publishing


Thanks for your feedback!

Feedback submitted

Could not send message

Please try again later or send an E-mail