6 Search Results for "Rabie, Mikaël"


Document
When Should You Wait Before Updating? - Toward a Robustness Refinement

Authors: Swan Dubois, Laurent Feuilloley, Franck Petit, and Mikaël Rabie

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 257, 2nd Symposium on Algorithmic Foundations of Dynamic Networks (SAND 2023)


Abstract
Consider a dynamic network and a given distributed problem. At any point in time, there might exist several solutions that are equally good with respect to the problem specification, but that are different from an algorithmic perspective, because some could be easier to update than others when the network changes. In other words, one would prefer to have a solution that is more robust to topological changes in the network; and in this direction the best scenario would be that the solution remains correct despite the dynamic of the network. In [Arnaud Casteigts et al., 2020], the authors introduced a very strong robustness criterion: they required that for any removal of edges that maintain the network connected, the solution remains valid. They focus on the maximal independent set problem, and their approach consists in characterizing the graphs in which there exists a robust solution (the existential problem), or even stronger, where any solution is robust (the universal problem). As the robustness criteria is very demanding, few graphs have a robust solution, and even fewer are such that all of their solutions are robust. In this paper, we ask the following question: Can we have robustness for a larger class of networks, if we bound the number k of edge removals allowed? To answer this question, we consider three classic problems: maximal independent set, minimal dominating set and maximal matching. For the universal problem, the answers for the three cases are surprisingly different. For minimal dominating set, the class does not depend on the number of edges removed. For maximal matching, removing only one edge defines a robust class related to perfect matchings, but for all other bounds k, the class is the same as for an arbitrary number of edge removals. Finally, for maximal independent set, there is a strict hierarchy of classes: the class for the bound k is strictly larger than the class for bound k+1. For the robustness notion of [Arnaud Casteigts et al., 2020], no characterization of the class for the existential problem is known, only a polynomial-time recognition algorithm. We show that the situation is even worse for bounded k: even for k = 1, it is NP-hard to decide whether a graph has a robust maximal independent set.

Cite as

Swan Dubois, Laurent Feuilloley, Franck Petit, and Mikaël Rabie. When Should You Wait Before Updating? - Toward a Robustness Refinement. In 2nd Symposium on Algorithmic Foundations of Dynamic Networks (SAND 2023). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 257, pp. 7:1-7:15, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2023)


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@InProceedings{dubois_et_al:LIPIcs.SAND.2023.7,
  author =	{Dubois, Swan and Feuilloley, Laurent and Petit, Franck and Rabie, Mika\"{e}l},
  title =	{{When Should You Wait Before Updating? - Toward a Robustness Refinement}},
  booktitle =	{2nd Symposium on Algorithmic Foundations of Dynamic Networks (SAND 2023)},
  pages =	{7:1--7:15},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-275-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2023},
  volume =	{257},
  editor =	{Doty, David and Spirakis, Paul},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.SAND.2023.7},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-179435},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.SAND.2023.7},
  annote =	{Keywords: Robustness, dynamic network, temporal graphs, edge removal, connectivity, footprint, packing/covering problems, maximal independent set, maximal matching, minimum dominating set, perfect matching, NP-hardness}
}
Document
Making Self-Stabilizing Algorithms for Any Locally Greedy Problem

Authors: Johanne Cohen, Laurence Pilard, Mikaël Rabie, and Jonas Sénizergues

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 257, 2nd Symposium on Algorithmic Foundations of Dynamic Networks (SAND 2023)


Abstract
Self-stabilizing algorithms are a way to deal with network dynamicity, as it will update itself after a network change (addition or removal of nodes or edges), as long as changes are not frequent. We propose an automatic transformation of synchronous distributed algorithms that solve locally greedy and mendable problems into self-stabilizing algorithms in anonymous networks. Mendable problems are a generalization of greedy problems where any partial solution may be transformed -instead of completed- into a global solution: every time we extend the partial solution, we are allowed to change the previous partial solution up to a given distance. Locally here means that to extend a solution for a node, we need to look at a constant distance from it. In order to do this, we propose the first explicit self-stabilizing algorithm computing a (k,k-1)-ruling set (i.e. a "maximal independent set at distance k"). By combining this technique multiple times, we compute a distance-K coloring of the graph. With this coloring we can finally simulate Local model algorithms running in a constant number of rounds, using the colors as unique identifiers. Our algorithms work under the Gouda daemon, similar to the probabilistic daemon: if an event should eventually happen, it will occur.

Cite as

Johanne Cohen, Laurence Pilard, Mikaël Rabie, and Jonas Sénizergues. Making Self-Stabilizing Algorithms for Any Locally Greedy Problem. In 2nd Symposium on Algorithmic Foundations of Dynamic Networks (SAND 2023). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 257, pp. 11:1-11:17, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2023)


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@InProceedings{cohen_et_al:LIPIcs.SAND.2023.11,
  author =	{Cohen, Johanne and Pilard, Laurence and Rabie, Mika\"{e}l and S\'{e}nizergues, Jonas},
  title =	{{Making Self-Stabilizing Algorithms for Any Locally Greedy Problem}},
  booktitle =	{2nd Symposium on Algorithmic Foundations of Dynamic Networks (SAND 2023)},
  pages =	{11:1--11:17},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-275-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2023},
  volume =	{257},
  editor =	{Doty, David and Spirakis, Paul},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.SAND.2023.11},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-179475},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.SAND.2023.11},
  annote =	{Keywords: Greedy Problem, Ruling Set, Distance-K Coloring, Self-Stabilizing Algorithm}
}
Document
Fault Tolerant Coloring of the Asynchronous Cycle

Authors: Pierre Fraigniaud, Patrick Lambein-Monette, and Mikaël Rabie

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 246, 36th International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2022)


Abstract
We present a wait-free algorithm for proper coloring the n nodes of the asynchronous cycle C_n, where each crash-prone node starts with its (unique) identifier as input. The algorithm is independent of n ≥ 3, and runs in O(log^*n) rounds in C_n. This round-complexity is optimal thanks to a known matching lower bound, which applies even to synchronous (failure-free) executions. The range of colors used by our algorithm, namely {0,…,4}, is optimal too, thanks to a known lower bound on the minimum number of names for which renaming is solvable wait-free in shared-memory systems, whenever n is a power of a prime. Indeed, our model coincides with the shared-memory model whenever n = 3, and the minimum number of names for which renaming is possible in 3-process shared-memory systems is 5.

Cite as

Pierre Fraigniaud, Patrick Lambein-Monette, and Mikaël Rabie. Fault Tolerant Coloring of the Asynchronous Cycle. In 36th International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2022). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 246, pp. 23:1-23:22, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@InProceedings{fraigniaud_et_al:LIPIcs.DISC.2022.23,
  author =	{Fraigniaud, Pierre and Lambein-Monette, Patrick and Rabie, Mika\"{e}l},
  title =	{{Fault Tolerant Coloring of the Asynchronous Cycle}},
  booktitle =	{36th International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2022)},
  pages =	{23:1--23:22},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-255-6},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{246},
  editor =	{Scheideler, Christian},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.DISC.2022.23},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-172147},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.DISC.2022.23},
  annote =	{Keywords: graph coloring, LOCAL model, shared-memory model, immediate snapshot, renaming, wait-free algorithms}
}
Document
Distributed Recoloring of Interval and Chordal Graphs

Authors: Nicolas Bousquet, Laurent Feuilloley, Marc Heinrich, and Mikaël Rabie

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 217, 25th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2021)


Abstract
One of the fundamental and most-studied algorithmic problems in distributed computing on networks is graph coloring, both in bounded-degree and in general graphs. Recently, the study of this problem has been extended in two directions. First, the problem of recoloring, that is computing an efficient transformation between two given colorings (instead of computing a new coloring), has been considered, both to model radio network updates, and as a useful subroutine for coloring. Second, as it appears that general graphs and bounded-degree graphs do not model real networks very well (with, respectively, pathological worst-case topologies and too strong assumptions), coloring has been studied in more specific graph classes. In this paper, we study the intersection of these two directions: distributed recoloring in two relevant graph classes, interval and chordal graphs. More formally, the question of recoloring a graph is as follows: we are given a network, an input coloring α and a target coloring β, and we want to find a schedule of colorings to reach β starting from α. In a distributed setting, the schedule needs to be found within the LOCAL model, where nodes communicate with their direct neighbors synchronously. The question we want to answer is: how many rounds of communication {are} needed to produce a schedule, and what is the length of this schedule? In the case of interval and chordal graphs, we prove that, if we have less than 2ω colors, ω being the size of the largest clique, extra colors will be needed in the intermediate colorings. For interval graphs, we produce a schedule after O(poly(Δ)log*n) rounds of communication, and for chordal graphs, we need O(ω²Δ²log n) rounds to get one. Our techniques also improve classic coloring algorithms. Namely, we get ω+1-colorings of interval graphs in O(ωlog*n) rounds and of chordal graphs in O(ωlog n) rounds, which improves on previous known algorithms that use ω+2 colors for the same running times.

Cite as

Nicolas Bousquet, Laurent Feuilloley, Marc Heinrich, and Mikaël Rabie. Distributed Recoloring of Interval and Chordal Graphs. In 25th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2021). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 217, pp. 19:1-19:17, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@InProceedings{bousquet_et_al:LIPIcs.OPODIS.2021.19,
  author =	{Bousquet, Nicolas and Feuilloley, Laurent and Heinrich, Marc and Rabie, Mika\"{e}l},
  title =	{{Distributed Recoloring of Interval and Chordal Graphs}},
  booktitle =	{25th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2021)},
  pages =	{19:1--19:17},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-219-8},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{217},
  editor =	{Bramas, Quentin and Gramoli, Vincent and Milani, Alessia},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.OPODIS.2021.19},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-157941},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.OPODIS.2021.19},
  annote =	{Keywords: Distributed coloring, distributed recoloring, interval graphs, chordal graphs, intersection graphs}
}
Document
Track C: Foundations of Networks and Multi-Agent Systems: Models, Algorithms and Information Management
Distributed Reconfiguration of Maximal Independent Sets

Authors: Keren Censor-Hillel and Mikaël Rabie

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 132, 46th International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2019)


Abstract
In this paper, we investigate a distributed maximal independent set (MIS) reconfiguration problem, in which there are two maximal independent sets for which every node is given its membership status, and the nodes need to communicate with their neighbors in order to find a reconfiguration schedule that switches from the first MIS to the second. Such a schedule is a list of independent sets that is restricted by forbidding two neighbors to change their membership status at the same step. In addition, these independent sets should provide some covering guarantee. We show that obtaining an actual MIS (and even a 3-dominating set) in each intermediate step is impossible. However, we provide efficient solutions when the intermediate sets are only required to be independent and 4-dominating, which is almost always possible, as we fully characterize. Consequently, our goal is to pin down the tradeoff between the possible length of the schedule and the number of communication rounds. We prove that a constant length schedule can be found in O(MIS+R32) rounds, where MIS is the complexity of finding an MIS in a worst-case graph and R32 is the complexity of finding a (3,2)-ruling set. For bounded degree graphs, this is O(log^*n) rounds and we show that it is necessary. On the other extreme, we show that with a constant number of rounds we can find a linear length schedule.

Cite as

Keren Censor-Hillel and Mikaël Rabie. Distributed Reconfiguration of Maximal Independent Sets. In 46th International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 132, pp. 135:1-135:14, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{censorhillel_et_al:LIPIcs.ICALP.2019.135,
  author =	{Censor-Hillel, Keren and Rabie, Mika\"{e}l},
  title =	{{Distributed Reconfiguration of Maximal Independent Sets}},
  booktitle =	{46th International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2019)},
  pages =	{135:1--135:14},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-109-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{132},
  editor =	{Baier, Christel and Chatzigiannakis, Ioannis and Flocchini, Paola and Leonardi, Stefano},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ICALP.2019.135},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-107111},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ICALP.2019.135},
  annote =	{Keywords: distributed graph algorithms, reconfiguration, maximal independent set}
}
Document
Distributed Recoloring

Authors: Marthe Bonamy, Paul Ouvrard, Mikaël Rabie, Jukka Suomela, and Jara Uitto

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 121, 32nd International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2018)


Abstract
Given two colorings of a graph, we consider the following problem: can we recolor the graph from one coloring to the other through a series of elementary changes, such that the graph is properly colored after each step? We introduce the notion of distributed recoloring: The input graph represents a network of computers that needs to be recolored. Initially, each node is aware of its own input color and target color. The nodes can exchange messages with each other, and eventually each node has to stop and output its own recoloring schedule, indicating when and how the node changes its color. The recoloring schedules have to be globally consistent so that the graph remains properly colored at each point, and we require that adjacent nodes do not change their colors simultaneously. We are interested in the following questions: How many communication rounds are needed (in the deterministic LOCAL model of distributed computing) to find a recoloring schedule? What is the length of the recoloring schedule? And how does the picture change if we can use extra colors to make recoloring easier? The main contributions of this work are related to distributed recoloring with one extra color in the following graph classes: trees, 3-regular graphs, and toroidal grids.

Cite as

Marthe Bonamy, Paul Ouvrard, Mikaël Rabie, Jukka Suomela, and Jara Uitto. Distributed Recoloring. In 32nd International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2018). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 121, pp. 12:1-12:17, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@InProceedings{bonamy_et_al:LIPIcs.DISC.2018.12,
  author =	{Bonamy, Marthe and Ouvrard, Paul and Rabie, Mika\"{e}l and Suomela, Jukka and Uitto, Jara},
  title =	{{Distributed Recoloring}},
  booktitle =	{32nd International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2018)},
  pages =	{12:1--12:17},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-092-7},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{121},
  editor =	{Schmid, Ulrich and Widder, Josef},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.DISC.2018.12},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-98012},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.DISC.2018.12},
  annote =	{Keywords: Distributed Systems, Graph Algorithms, Local Computations}
}
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