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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 3, Issue 11



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Complete Issue
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 3, Issue 11, November 2013, Complete Issue

Abstract
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 3, Issue 11, November 2013, Complete Issue

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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 3, Issue 11, November 2013, Complete Issue. In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 3, Issue 11, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{DagRep.3.11,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 3, Issue 11, November 2013, Complete Issue}},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{3},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.3.11},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-45127},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.3.11},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 3, Issue 11, November 2013, Complete Issue}
}
Document
Front Matter
Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 3, Issue 11, 2013

Abstract
Table of Contents, Frontmatter

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Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 3, Issue 11, 2013. In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 3, Issue 11, pp. i-ii, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{DagRep.3.11.i,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 3, Issue 11, 2013}},
  pages =	{i--ii},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{3},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.3.11.i},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-45114},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.3.11.i},
  annote =	{Keywords: Table of Contents, Frontmatter}
}
Document
Computational Audio Analysis (Dagstuhl Seminar 13451)

Authors: Meinard Müller, Shrikanth S. Narayanan, and Björn Schuller


Abstract
Compared to traditional speech, music, or sound processing, the computational analysis of general audio data has a relatively young research history. In particular, the extraction of affective information (i.e., information that does not deal with the 'immediate' nature of the content such as the spoken words or note events) from audio signals has become an important research strand with a huge increase of interest in academia and industry. At an early stage of this novel research direction, many analysis techniques and representations were simply transferred from the speech domain to other audio domains. However, general audio signals (including their affective aspects) typically possess acoustic and structural characteristics that distinguish them from spoken language or isolated `controlled' music or sound events. In the Dagstuhl Seminar 13451 titled "Computational Audio Analysis" we discussed the development of novel machine learning as well as signal processing techniques that are applicable for a wide range of audio signals and analysis tasks. In particular, we looked at a variety of sounds besides speech such as music recordings, animal sounds, environmental sounds, and mixtures thereof. In this report, we give an overview of the various contributions and results of the seminar. We start with an executive summary, which describes the main topics, goals, and group activities. Then, one finds a list of abstracts giving a more detailed overview of the participants' contributions as well as of the ideas and results discussed in the group meetings of our seminar. To conclude, an attempt is made to define the field as given by the views of the participants.

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Meinard Müller, Shrikanth S. Narayanan, and Björn Schuller. Computational Audio Analysis (Dagstuhl Seminar 13451). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 3, Issue 11, pp. 1-28, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{muller_et_al:DagRep.3.11.1,
  author =	{M\"{u}ller, Meinard and Narayanan, Shrikanth S. and Schuller, Bj\"{o}rn},
  title =	{{Computational Audio Analysis (Dagstuhl Seminar 13451)}},
  pages =	{1--28},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{3},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{M\"{u}ller, Meinard and Narayanan, Shrikanth S. and Schuller, Bj\"{o}rn},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.3.11.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-44346},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.3.11.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: Audio Analysis, Signal Processing, Machine Learning, Sound, Speech, Music, Affective Computing}
}
Document
Proxemics in Human-Computer Interaction (Dagstuhl Seminar 13452)

Authors: Saul Greenberg, Kasper Honbaek, Aaron Quigley, Harald Reiterer, and Roman Rädle


Abstract
In 1966, anthropologist Edward Hall coined the term "proxemics." Proxemics is an area of study that identifies the culturally dependent ways in which people use interpersonal distance to understand and mediate their interactions with others. Recent research has demonstrated the use of proxemics in human-computer interaction (HCI) for supporting users' explicit and implicit interactions in a range of uses, including remote office collaboration, home entertainment, and games. One promise of proxemics is the realization of context-aware environments, which have been extensively pursued since Marc Weiser's seminal paper, "The computer for the 21st century," written in 1991. However, the potential of proxemics in HCI is still underexplored and many research questions remain unanswered. With the growing interest in using proxemics, we organized the Dagstuhl Seminar 13452 on the topic. "Proxemics in Human-Computer Interaction," was held from November 3-8, 2013, and it brought together established experts and young researchers from fields particularly relevant to Proxemic Interactions, including computer science, social science, cognitive science, and design. Through an open keynote, mini talks, brainstorming, and discussion in breakout sessions, seminar attendees identified and discussed challenges and developed directions for future research of proxemics in HCI.

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Saul Greenberg, Kasper Honbaek, Aaron Quigley, Harald Reiterer, and Roman Rädle. Proxemics in Human-Computer Interaction (Dagstuhl Seminar 13452). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 3, Issue 11, pp. 29-57, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{greenberg_et_al:DagRep.3.11.29,
  author =	{Greenberg, Saul and Honbaek, Kasper and Quigley, Aaron and Reiterer, Harald and R\"{a}dle, Roman},
  title =	{{Proxemics in Human-Computer Interaction (Dagstuhl Seminar 13452)}},
  pages =	{29--57},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{3},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Greenberg, Saul and Honbaek, Kasper and Quigley, Aaron and Reiterer, Harald and R\"{a}dle, Roman},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.3.11.29},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-44363},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.3.11.29},
  annote =	{Keywords: Proxemics, Proxemic Interactions, theory, vision, technology, application, distance, orientation, location, identity, movement, dark patterns}
}
Document
Electronic Markets and Auctions (Dagstuhl Seminar 13461)

Authors: Yishay Mansour, Benny Moldovanu, Noam Nisan, and Berthold Vöcking


Abstract
The main goal of this workshop was to study topics related to electronic markets and auctions both from the computational perspective and from a game-theoretic and economic one. From the computer science perspective, with the advent of the Internet, there has been a significant amount of work in Algorithmic Game Theory focusing on computational aspects of electronic markets and on algorithmic aspects of mechanism design. Economics have been traditionally interested in markets in general and designing efficient markets mechanisms (such as auctions) in particular. The recent emergence of electronic markets and auctions has only reemphasized the importance of this topic.

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Yishay Mansour, Benny Moldovanu, Noam Nisan, and Berthold Vöcking. Electronic Markets and Auctions (Dagstuhl Seminar 13461). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 3, Issue 11, pp. 58-78, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{mansour_et_al:DagRep.3.11.58,
  author =	{Mansour, Yishay and Moldovanu, Benny and Nisan, Noam and V\"{o}cking, Berthold},
  title =	{{Electronic Markets and Auctions (Dagstuhl Seminar 13461)}},
  pages =	{58--78},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{3},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Mansour, Yishay and Moldovanu, Benny and Nisan, Noam and V\"{o}cking, Berthold},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.3.11.58},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-44379},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.3.11.58},
  annote =	{Keywords: Algorithmic game theory, mechanism design, economics, electronic markets}
}
Document
Computational Models of Language Meaning in Context (Dagstuhl Seminar 13462)

Authors: Hans Kamp, Alessandro Lenci, and James Pustejovsky


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 13462 "Computational Models of Language Meaning in Context". The seminar addresses one of the most significant issues to arise in contemporary formal and computational models of language and inference: that of the role and expressiveness of distributional models of semantics and statistically derived models of language and linguistic behavior. The availability of very large corpora has brought about a near revolution in computational linguistics and language modeling, including machine translation, information extraction, and question-answering. Several new models of language meaning are emerging that provide potential formal interpretations of linguistic patterns emerging from these distributional datasets. But whether such systems can provide avenues for formal and robust inference and reasoning is very much still uncertain. This seminar examines the relationship between classical models of language meaning and distributional models, and the role of corpora, annotations, and the distributional models derived over these data. To our knowledge, there have been no recent Dagstuhl Seminars on this or related topics.

Cite as

Hans Kamp, Alessandro Lenci, and James Pustejovsky. Computational Models of Language Meaning in Context (Dagstuhl Seminar 13462). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 3, Issue 11, pp. 79-116, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{kamp_et_al:DagRep.3.11.79,
  author =	{Kamp, Hans and Lenci, Alessandro and Pustejovsky, James},
  title =	{{Computational Models of Language Meaning in Context (Dagstuhl Seminar 13462)}},
  pages =	{79--116},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{3},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Kamp, Hans and Lenci, Alessandro and Pustejovsky, James},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.3.11.79},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-44380},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.3.11.79},
  annote =	{Keywords: formal semantics, distributional semantics, polysemy, inference, compositionality, Natural Language Processing, meaning in context}
}
Document
Synchronous Programming (Dagstuhl Seminar 13471)

Authors: Stephen A. Edwards, Alain Girault, and Klaus Schneider


Abstract
Synchronous programming languages are programming languages with an abstract (logical) notion of time: The execution of such programs is divided into discrete reaction steps, and in each of these reactions steps, the program reads new inputs and reacts by computing corresponding outputs of the considered reaction step. The programs are called synchronous because all outputs are computed together in zero time within a step and because parallel components synchronize their reaction steps by the semantics of the languages. For this reason, the synchronous composition is deterministic, which is a great advantage concerning predictability, verification of system design, and embedded code generation. Starting with the definition of the classic synchronous languages Esterel, Lustre and Signal in the late 1980's, the research during the past 20 years was very fruitful and lead to new languages, compilation techniques, software and hardware architectures, as well as extensions, transformations, and interfaces to other models of computations, in particular to asynchronous and hybrid systems. This report is a summary of the Dagstuhl Seminar 13471 "Synchronous Programming", which took place during November 18-22, 2013, and which was the 20th edition of the yearly workshop of the synchronous programming community. The report contains the abstracts of the presentations given during the seminar in addition to the documents provided by the participants on the web pages of the seminar.

Cite as

Stephen A. Edwards, Alain Girault, and Klaus Schneider. Synchronous Programming (Dagstuhl Seminar 13471). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 3, Issue 11, pp. 117-143, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{edwards_et_al:DagRep.3.11.117,
  author =	{Edwards, Stephen A. and Girault, Alain and Schneider, Klaus},
  title =	{{Synchronous Programming (Dagstuhl Seminar 13471)}},
  pages =	{117--143},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{3},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Edwards, Stephen A. and Girault, Alain and Schneider, Klaus},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.3.11.117},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-44395},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.3.11.117},
  annote =	{Keywords: Synchronous Languages, Hybrid Systems, Formal Verification, Models of Computation, WCET-Analysis, Embedded Systems}
}
Document
Global Measurement Framework (Dagstuhl Seminar 13472)

Authors: Philip Eardley, Marco Mellia, Jörg Ott, Jürgen Schönwälder, and Henning Schulzrinne


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 13472 "Global Measurement Framework".

Cite as

Philip Eardley, Marco Mellia, Jörg Ott, Jürgen Schönwälder, and Henning Schulzrinne. Global Measurement Framework (Dagstuhl Seminar 13472). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 3, Issue 11, pp. 144-153, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{eardley_et_al:DagRep.3.11.144,
  author =	{Eardley, Philip and Mellia, Marco and Ott, J\"{o}rg and Sch\"{o}nw\"{a}lder, J\"{u}rgen and Schulzrinne, Henning},
  title =	{{Global Measurement Framework (Dagstuhl Seminar 13472)}},
  pages =	{144--153},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{3},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Eardley, Philip and Mellia, Marco and Ott, J\"{o}rg and Sch\"{o}nw\"{a}lder, J\"{u}rgen and Schulzrinne, Henning},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.3.11.144},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-44401},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.3.11.144},
  annote =	{Keywords: Internet measurements, Quality of experience, Network management, Traffic engineering}
}
Document
Unleashing Operational Process Mining (Dagstuhl Seminar 13481)

Authors: Rafael Accorsi, Ernesto Damiani, and Wil van der Aalst


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 13481 "Unleashing Operational Process Mining". Process mining is a young research discipline connecting computational intelligence and data mining on the one hand and process modeling and analysis on the other hand. The goal of process mining is to discover, monitor, diagnose and improve real processes by extracting knowledge from event logs readily available in today's information systems. Process mining bridges the gap between data mining and business process modeling and analysis. The seminar that took place November 2013 was the first in its kind. About 50 process mining experts joined forces to discuss the main process mining challenges and present cutting edge results. This report aims to describe the presentations, discussions, and findings.

Cite as

Rafael Accorsi, Ernesto Damiani, and Wil van der Aalst. Unleashing Operational Process Mining (Dagstuhl Seminar 13481). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 3, Issue 11, pp. 154-192, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{accorsi_et_al:DagRep.3.11.154,
  author =	{Accorsi, Rafael and Damiani, Ernesto and van der Aalst, Wil},
  title =	{{Unleashing Operational Process Mining (Dagstuhl Seminar 13481)}},
  pages =	{154--192},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{3},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Accorsi, Rafael and Damiani, Ernesto and van der Aalst, Wil},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.3.11.154},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-44417},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.3.11.154},
  annote =	{Keywords: Process mining, Big data, Conformance checking}
}
Document
Forensic Computing (Dagstuhl Seminar 13482)

Authors: Felix C. Freiling, Gerrit Hornung, and Radim Polcák


Abstract
Forensic computing} (sometimes also called digital forensics, computer forensics or IT forensics) is a branch of forensic science pertaining to digital evidence, i.e., any legal evidence that is processed by digital computer systems or stored on digital storage media. Forensic computing is a new discipline evolving within the intersection of several established research areas such as computer science, computer engineering and law. Forensic computing is rapidly gaining importance since the amount of crime involving digital systems is steadily increasing. Furthermore, the area is still underdeveloped and poses many technical and legal challenges. This Dagstuhl seminar brought together researchers and practitioners from computer science and law covering the diverse areas of forensic computing. The goal of the seminar was to further establish forensic computing as a scientific research discipline, to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the research field, and to discuss the foundations of its methodology. The seminar was jointly organized by Prof.Dr. Felix Freiling (Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany), Prof.Dr. Radim Polcák (Masaryk University, Czech Republic), Prof.Dr. Gerrit Hornung (Universität Passau, Germany). It was attended by 22 participants and its structure was based on experiences from a similar seminar in 2011 (Dagstuhl Seminar 11401).

Cite as

Felix C. Freiling, Gerrit Hornung, and Radim Polcák. Forensic Computing (Dagstuhl Seminar 13482). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 3, Issue 11, pp. 193-208, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2014)


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@Article{freiling_et_al:DagRep.3.11.193,
  author =	{Freiling, Felix C. and Hornung, Gerrit and Polc\'{a}k, Radim},
  title =	{{Forensic Computing (Dagstuhl Seminar 13482)}},
  pages =	{193--208},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2014},
  volume =	{3},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Freiling, Felix C. and Hornung, Gerrit and Polc\'{a}k, Radim},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.3.11.193},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-44426},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.3.11.193},
  annote =	{Keywords: practical experience in forensics and law; applied forensic computing}
}

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