Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 11



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Complete Issue
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 11, November 2018, Complete Issue

Abstract
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 11, November 2018, Complete Issue

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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 11, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{DagRep.8.11,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 11, November 2018, Complete Issue}},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{11},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.11},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-105656},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.11},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 11, November 2018, Complete Issue}
}
Document
Front Matter
Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 8, Issue 11, 2018

Abstract
Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 8, Issue 11, 2018

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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 11, pp. i-ii, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{DagRep.8.11.i,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 8, Issue 11, 2018}},
  pages =	{i--ii},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{11},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.11.i},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-105631},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.11.i},
  annote =	{Keywords: Table of Contents, Frontmatter}
}
Document
Genomics, Pattern Avoidance, and Statistical Mechanics (Dagstuhl Seminar 18451)

Authors: Michael Albert, David Bevan, Miklós Bóna, and István Miklós


Abstract
We summarize key features of the workshop, such as the three main research areas in which the participants are active, the number and types of talks, and the geographic diversity of the attendees. We also provide a sampling of the collaborations started at the workshop, and explain why we believe that the workshop was successful, and why we believe it should take place again in the future.

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Michael Albert, David Bevan, Miklós Bóna, and István Miklós. Genomics, Pattern Avoidance, and Statistical Mechanics (Dagstuhl Seminar 18451). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 11, pp. 1-20, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{albert_et_al:DagRep.8.11.1,
  author =	{Albert, Michael and Bevan, David and B\'{o}na, Mikl\'{o}s and Mikl\'{o}s, Istv\'{a}n},
  title =	{{Genomics, Pattern Avoidance, and Statistical Mechanics (Dagstuhl Seminar 18451)}},
  pages =	{1--20},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Albert, Michael and Bevan, David and B\'{o}na, Mikl\'{o}s and Mikl\'{o}s, Istv\'{a}n},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.11.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-103539},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.11.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: Genome rearrangements, Matrix, Pattern, Permutation, Statistical Mechanics}
}
Document
Blockchain Security at Scale (Dagstuhl Seminar 18461)

Authors: Rainer Böhme, Joseph Bonneau, and Ittay Eyal


Abstract
38 researchers affiliated with over 25 different institutions in 7 countries met during Dagstuhl Seminar 18461 for discussing open problems regarding "Blockchain Security at Scale." The seminar was split into eight blocks of two presentations each. The mode for each talk was 15 minutes of blackboard-only presentation followed by 30 minutes of discussion. Discussions not fitting into this limit were resumed in smaller break-out groups. This report documents the scheduled talks as well as the improvised sessions for in-depth discussion.

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Rainer Böhme, Joseph Bonneau, and Ittay Eyal. Blockchain Security at Scale (Dagstuhl Seminar 18461). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 11, pp. 21-34, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{bohme_et_al:DagRep.8.11.21,
  author =	{B\"{o}hme, Rainer and Bonneau, Joseph and Eyal, Ittay},
  title =	{{Blockchain Security at Scale (Dagstuhl Seminar 18461)}},
  pages =	{21--34},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{B\"{o}hme, Rainer and Bonneau, Joseph and Eyal, Ittay},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.11.21},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-103542},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.11.21},
  annote =	{Keywords: Blockchain, Consensus, Cryptography, Distributed Systems, Game Theory, Scaling}
}
Document
Provenance and Logging for Sense Making (Dagstuhl Seminar 18462)

Authors: Jean-Daniel Fekete, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Melanie Tory, and Kai Xu


Abstract
Sense making is one of the biggest challenges in data analysis faced by both the industry and the research community. It involves understanding the data and uncovering its model, generating a hypothesis, selecting analysis methods, creating novel solutions, designing evaluation, and also critical thinking and learning wherever needed. The research and development for such sense making tasks lags far behind the fast-changing user needs, such as those that emerged recently as the result of so-called "Big Data". As a result, sense making is often performed manually and the limited human cognition capability becomes the bottleneck of sense making in data analysis and decision making. One of the recent advances in sense making research is the capture, visualization, and analysis of provenance information. Provenance is the history and context of sense making, including the data/analysis used and the users' critical thinking process. It has been shown that provenance can effectively support many sense making tasks. For instance, provenance can provide an overview of what has been examined and reveal gaps like unexplored information or solution possibilities. Besides, provenance can support collaborative sense making and communication by sharing the rich context of the sense making process. Besides data analysis and decision making, provenance has been studied in many other fields, sometimes under different names, for different types of sense making. For example, the Human-Computer Interaction community relies on the analysis of logging to understand user behaviors and intentions; the WWW and database community has been working on data lineage to understand uncertainty and trustworthiness; and finally, reproducible science heavily relies on provenance to improve the reliability and efficiency of scientific research. This Dagstuhl Seminar brought together researchers from the diverse fields that relate to provenance and sense making to foster cross-community collaboration. Shared challenges were identified and progress has been made towards developing novel solutions.

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Jean-Daniel Fekete, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Melanie Tory, and Kai Xu. Provenance and Logging for Sense Making (Dagstuhl Seminar 18462). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 11, pp. 35-62, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{fekete_et_al:DagRep.8.11.35,
  author =	{Fekete, Jean-Daniel and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Tory, Melanie and Xu, Kai},
  title =	{{Provenance and Logging for Sense Making (Dagstuhl Seminar 18462)}},
  pages =	{35--62},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Fekete, Jean-Daniel and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Tory, Melanie and Xu, Kai},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.11.35},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-103554},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.11.35},
  annote =	{Keywords: Logging, Provenance, Sensemaking, Visualization}
}
Document
Next Generation Domain Specific Conceptual Modeling: Principles and Methods (Dagstuhl Seminar 18471)

Authors: Heinrich C. Mayr, Sudha Ram, Wolfgang Reisig, and Markus Stumptner


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 18471 "Next Genera-tion Domain Specific Conceptual Modeling: Principles and Methods". It summarizes the resultsof the seminar and shows in which direction (Domain Specific) Conceptual Modeling shoulddevelop in the opinion of the participants. In addition, the report contains abstracts of thenumerous talks presented during the seminar as well as a summary of the discussions held inworking groups during the seminar. In particular, some open questions will be touched upon,which will be dealt with before a follow-up seminar.

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Heinrich C. Mayr, Sudha Ram, Wolfgang Reisig, and Markus Stumptner. Next Generation Domain Specific Conceptual Modeling: Principles and Methods (Dagstuhl Seminar 18471). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 11, pp. 63-90, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{mayr_et_al:DagRep.8.11.63,
  author =	{Mayr, Heinrich C. and Ram, Sudha and Reisig, Wolfgang and Stumptner, Markus},
  title =	{{Next Generation Domain Specific Conceptual Modeling: Principles and Methods (Dagstuhl Seminar 18471)}},
  pages =	{63--90},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Mayr, Heinrich C. and Ram, Sudha and Reisig, Wolfgang and Stumptner, Markus},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.11.63},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-103560},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.11.63},
  annote =	{Keywords: DSML, Meta Model, Modeling, Modeling Method, Semantics}
}
Document
Implementing FAIR Data Infrastructures (Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop 18472)

Authors: Natalia Manola, Peter Mutschke, Guido Scherp, Klaus Tochtermann, and Peter Wittenburg


Abstract
This report documents the programme and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop 18472 "Implementing FAIR Data Infrastructures". The workshop aimed at bringing together computer scientists with digital infrastructure experts from different domains to discuss open issues implementing and adopting the FAIR principles in research data infrastructures and to shape the role that the field of computer science has to play.

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Natalia Manola, Peter Mutschke, Guido Scherp, Klaus Tochtermann, and Peter Wittenburg. Implementing FAIR Data Infrastructures (Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop 18472). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 11, pp. 91-111, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{manola_et_al:DagRep.8.11.91,
  author =	{Manola, Natalia and Mutschke, Peter and Scherp, Guido and Tochtermann, Klaus and Wittenburg, Peter},
  title =	{{Implementing FAIR Data Infrastructures (Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop 18472)}},
  pages =	{91--111},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Manola, Natalia and Mutschke, Peter and Scherp, Guido and Tochtermann, Klaus and Wittenburg, Peter},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.11.91},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-103577},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.11.91},
  annote =	{Keywords: fair principles, open data, open science, research data infrastructures}
}
Document
High Throughput Connectomics (Dagstuhl Seminar 18481)

Authors: Moritz Helmstaedter, Jeff Lichtman, and Nir Shavit


Abstract
The structure of the nervous system is extraordinarily complicated because individual neurons are interconnected to hundreds or even thousands of other cells in networks that can extend over large volumes. Mapping such networks at the level of synaptic connections, a field called connectomics, began in the 1970s and has recently garnered general interest thanks to technical and computational advances that offer the possibility of mapping mammalian brains. However, modern connectomics produces `big data' that must be analyzed at unprecedented rates, and will require, as with genomics at the time, breakthrough algorithmic and computational solutions. This workshop will bring together key researchers in the field, and experts from related fields, in order to understand the problems at hand and provide new approaches towards the design of high throughput systems for mapping the micro-connectivity of the brain.

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Moritz Helmstaedter, Jeff Lichtman, and Nir Shavit. High Throughput Connectomics (Dagstuhl Seminar 18481). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 11, pp. 112-138, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{helmstaedter_et_al:DagRep.8.11.112,
  author =	{Helmstaedter, Moritz and Lichtman, Jeff and Shavit, Nir},
  title =	{{High Throughput Connectomics (Dagstuhl Seminar 18481)}},
  pages =	{112--138},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Helmstaedter, Moritz and Lichtman, Jeff and Shavit, Nir},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.11.112},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-103588},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.11.112},
  annote =	{Keywords: Big Data, Connectomics, Distributed Computing, Machine Learning, Parallel Computing}
}
Document
Network Visualization in the Humanities (Dagstuhl Seminar 18482)

Authors: Katy Börner, Oyvind Eide, Tamara Mchedlidze, Malte Rehbein, and Gerik Scheuermann


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 18482 "Network Visualization in the Humanities", which took place November 26-30, 2019. The seminar brought together 27 researchers on Network Visualization and Digital Humanities communities. During the seminar the participants shared knowledge on the existing methods of network visualization and on network visualization challenges present in the Humanities through the introductory talks, the abstracts of which are included in this report. Multiple innovative research challenges for Network Visualisation in the Humanities have been identified and according to those four working groups have been set up that discussed the topics in detail. The summary of the discussions of the working groups is given in this report.

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Katy Börner, Oyvind Eide, Tamara Mchedlidze, Malte Rehbein, and Gerik Scheuermann. Network Visualization in the Humanities (Dagstuhl Seminar 18482). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 11, pp. 139-153, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{borner_et_al:DagRep.8.11.139,
  author =	{B\"{o}rner, Katy and Eide, Oyvind and Mchedlidze, Tamara and Rehbein, Malte and Scheuermann, Gerik},
  title =	{{Network Visualization in the Humanities (Dagstuhl Seminar 18482)}},
  pages =	{139--153},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{B\"{o}rner, Katy and Eide, Oyvind and Mchedlidze, Tamara and Rehbein, Malte and Scheuermann, Gerik},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.11.139},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-103593},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.11.139},
  annote =	{Keywords: digital humanities, network visualization, graph drawing, human computer interaction, topic modelling, cyberinfrastructures, distant reading}
}

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