Volume

Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5431



Publication Details

  • published at: 2006-04-25
  • Publisher: Schloss-Dagstuhl - Leibniz Zentrum für Informatik

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Document
05431 Abstracts Collection – Deduction and Applications

Authors: Franz Baader, Peter Baumgartner, Robert Nieuwenhuis, and Andrei Voronkov


Abstract
From 23.10.05 to 28.10.05, the Dagstuhl Seminar 05431 ``Deduction and Applications'' was held in the International Conference and Research Center (IBFI), Schloss Dagstuhl. During the seminar, several participants presented their current research, and ongoing work and open problems were discussed. Abstracts of the presentations given during the seminar as well as abstracts of seminar results and ideas are put together in this paper. The first section describes the seminar topics and goals in general. Links to extended abstracts or full papers are provided, if available.

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Franz Baader, Peter Baumgartner, Robert Nieuwenhuis, and Andrei Voronkov. 05431 Abstracts Collection – Deduction and Applications. In Deduction and Applications. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5431, pp. 1-23, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2006)


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@InProceedings{baader_et_al:DagSemProc.05431.1,
  author =	{Baader, Franz and Baumgartner, Peter and Nieuwenhuis, Robert and Voronkov, Andrei},
  title =	{{05431 Abstracts Collection – Deduction and Applications}},
  booktitle =	{Deduction and Applications},
  pages =	{1--23},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2006},
  volume =	{5431},
  editor =	{Franz Baader and Peter Baumgartner and Robert Nieuwenhuis and Andrei Voronkov},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05431.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-5625},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05431.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: Formal logic, deduction, artificial intelligence}
}
Document
05431 Executive Summary – Deduction and Applications

Authors: Franz Baader, Peter Baumgartner, Robert Nieuwenhuis, and Andrei Voronkov


Abstract
Formal logic provides a mathematical foundation for many areas of computer science. Logical languages are used as specification language within, e.g., program development and verification, hardware design and verification, relational databases, and many subfields of Artificial Intelligence. Automated Deduction is concerned with the design and implementation of algorithms based on logical deduction for solving problems in these areas. The last years have seen considerable improvements concerning both basic automated deduction technology and its (real-world) applications. Accordingly, the goal of the seminar was to bring together researchers from both sides in order to get an overview of the state of the art, and also to get ideas how to advance automated deduction from an application oriented point of view.

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Franz Baader, Peter Baumgartner, Robert Nieuwenhuis, and Andrei Voronkov. 05431 Executive Summary – Deduction and Applications. In Deduction and Applications. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5431, pp. 1-3, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2006)


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@InProceedings{baader_et_al:DagSemProc.05431.2,
  author =	{Baader, Franz and Baumgartner, Peter and Nieuwenhuis, Robert and Voronkov, Andrei},
  title =	{{05431 Executive Summary – Deduction and Applications}},
  booktitle =	{Deduction and Applications},
  pages =	{1--3},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2006},
  volume =	{5431},
  editor =	{Franz Baader and Peter Baumgartner and Robert Nieuwenhuis and Andrei Voronkov},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05431.2},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-5100},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05431.2},
  annote =	{Keywords: Formal logic, deduction, artificial intelligence}
}
Document
Automatically Generating Loop Invariants Using Quantifier Elimination

Authors: Deepak Kapur


Abstract
An approach for automatically generating loop invariants using quantifier-elimination is proposed. An invariant of a loop is hypothesized as a parameterized formula. Parameters in the invariant are discovered by generating constraints on the parameters by ensuring that the formula is indeed preserved by the execution path corresponding to every basic cycle of the loop. The parameterized formula can be successively refined by considering execution paths one by one; heuristics can be developed for determining the order in which the paths are considered. Initialization of program variables as well as the precondition and postcondition of the loop, if available, can also be used to further refine the hypothesized invariant. Constraints on parameters generated in this way are solved for possible values of parameters. If no solution is possible, this means that an invariant of the hypothesized form does not exist for the loop. Otherwise, if the parametric constraints are solvable, then under certain conditions on methods for generating these constraints, the strongest possible invariant of the hypothesized form can be generated from most general solutions of the parametric constraints. The approach is illustrated using the first-order theory of polynomial equations as well as Presburger arithmetic.

Cite as

Deepak Kapur. Automatically Generating Loop Invariants Using Quantifier Elimination. In Deduction and Applications. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5431, pp. 1-17, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2006)


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@InProceedings{kapur:DagSemProc.05431.3,
  author =	{Kapur, Deepak},
  title =	{{Automatically Generating Loop Invariants Using Quantifier Elimination}},
  booktitle =	{Deduction and Applications},
  pages =	{1--17},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2006},
  volume =	{5431},
  editor =	{Franz Baader and Peter Baumgartner and Robert Nieuwenhuis and Andrei Voronkov},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05431.3},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-5116},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05431.3},
  annote =	{Keywords: Program verification, loop invariants, inductive assertions, quantifier elimination}
}
Document
On Algorithms and Complexity for Sets with Cardinality Constraints

Authors: Viktor Kuncak, Martin Rinard, and Bruno Marnette


Abstract
Complexity of data structures in modern programs presents a challenge for current analysis and verification tools, forcing them to report false alarms or miss errors. I will describe a new approach for verifying programs with complex data structures. This approach builds on program analysis techniques, as well as decision procedures and theorem provers. The approach is based on specifying interfaces of data structures by writing procedure preconditions and postconditions in terms of abstract sets and relations. Our system then separately verifies that 1) each data structure conforms to its interface, 2) each data structure interface is used correctly, and 3) desired high-level application-specific invariants hold. The system verifies these conditions by combining decision procedures, theorem provers, and static analyses, promising an unprecedented tradeoff between precision and scalability. In the context of this system, we have developed new decision procedures for reasoning about sets and their cardinalities, approaches for extending the applicability of existing decision procedures, and techniques for modular analysis of dynamically created data structure instances.

Cite as

Viktor Kuncak, Martin Rinard, and Bruno Marnette. On Algorithms and Complexity for Sets with Cardinality Constraints. In Deduction and Applications. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5431, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2006)


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@InProceedings{kuncak_et_al:DagSemProc.05431.4,
  author =	{Kuncak, Viktor and Rinard, Martin and Marnette, Bruno},
  title =	{{On Algorithms and Complexity for Sets with Cardinality Constraints}},
  booktitle =	{Deduction and Applications},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2006},
  volume =	{5431},
  editor =	{Franz Baader and Peter Baumgartner and Robert Nieuwenhuis and Andrei Voronkov},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05431.4},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-5125},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05431.4},
  annote =	{Keywords: Static analysis, data structure consistency, program verification, decision procedures}
}
Document
Proof Presentation

Authors: Jörg Siekmann


Abstract
The talk is based on a book about the human-oriented presentation of a mathematical proof in natural language, in a style as we may find it in a typical mathematical text book. How can a proof be other than human-oriented? What we have in mind is a deduction systems, which is implemented on a computer, that proves – with some human interaction – a mathematical textbook as may be used in an undergraduate course. The proofs generated by these systems today are far from being human-oriented and can in general only be read by an expert in the respective field: proofs between several hundred (for a common mathematical theorem), for more than a thousand steps (for an unusually difficult theorem) and more than ten thousand deduction steps (in a program verification task) are not uncommon. Although these proofs are provably correct, they are typically marred by many problems: to start with, that are usually written in a highly specialised logic such as the resolution calculus, in a matrix format, or even worse, they may be generated by a model checker. Moreover they record every logical step that may be necessary for the minute detail of some term transformation (such as, for example, the rearrangement of brackets) along side those arguments, a mathematician would call important steps or heureka-steps that capture the main idea of the proof. Only these would he be willing to communicate to his fellow mathematicians – provided they have a similar academic background and work in the same mathematical discipline. If not, i.e. if the proof was written say for an undergraduate textbook, the option of an important step may be viewed differently depending on the intended reader. Now, even if we were able to isolate the ten important steps – out of those hundreds of machine generated proof steps – there would still be the startling problem that they are usually written in the "wrong" order. A human reader might say: "they do not have a logical structure"; which is to say that of course they follow a logical pattern (as they are correctly generated by a machine), but, given the convention of the respective field and the way the trained mathematician in this field is used to communicate, they are somewhat strange and ill structured. And finally, there is the problem that proofs are purely formal and recorded in a predicate logic that is very far from the usual presentation that relies on a mixture of natural language arguments interspersed with some formalism. The book (about 800 page) which gives an answer to some of these problems is to appear with Elsevier

Cite as

Jörg Siekmann. Proof Presentation. In Deduction and Applications. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5431, pp. 1-7, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2006)


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@InProceedings{siekmann:DagSemProc.05431.5,
  author =	{Siekmann, J\"{o}rg},
  title =	{{Proof Presentation}},
  booktitle =	{Deduction and Applications},
  pages =	{1--7},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2006},
  volume =	{5431},
  editor =	{Franz Baader and Peter Baumgartner and Robert Nieuwenhuis and Andrei Voronkov},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05431.5},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-5611},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05431.5},
  annote =	{Keywords: Artificial intelligence, mathematics, proof presentation}
}
Document
Proving and Disproving Termination in the Dependency Pair Framework

Authors: Jürgen Giesl, René Thiemann, and Peter Schneider-Kamp


Abstract
The dependency pair framework is a new general concept to integrate arbitrary techniques for termination analysis of term rewriting. In this way, the benefits of different techniques can be combined and their modularity and power are increased significantly. Moreover, this framework facilitates the development of new methods for termination analysis. Traditionally, the research on termination focused on methods which prove termination and there were hardly any approaches for disproving termination. We show that with the dependency pair framework, one can combine the search for a proof and for a disproof of termination. In this way, we obtain the first powerful method which can also verify non-termination of term rewrite systems. We implemented and evaluated our contributions in the automated termination prover AProVE. Due to these results, AProVE was the winning tool in the International Competition of Termination Provers 2005, both for proving and for disproving termination of term rewriting.

Cite as

Jürgen Giesl, René Thiemann, and Peter Schneider-Kamp. Proving and Disproving Termination in the Dependency Pair Framework. In Deduction and Applications. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 5431, p. 1, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2006)


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@InProceedings{giesl_et_al:DagSemProc.05431.6,
  author =	{Giesl, J\"{u}rgen and Thiemann, Ren\'{e} and Schneider-Kamp, Peter},
  title =	{{Proving and Disproving Termination in the Dependency Pair Framework}},
  booktitle =	{Deduction and Applications},
  pages =	{1--1},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2006},
  volume =	{5431},
  editor =	{Franz Baader and Peter Baumgartner and Robert Nieuwenhuis and Andrei Voronkov},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.05431.6},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-5091},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.05431.6},
  annote =	{Keywords: Termination, non-termination, term rewriting, dependency pairs}
}

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