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Documents authored by Fefferman, Bill


Document
Quantum Pseudoentanglement

Authors: Scott Aaronson, Adam Bouland, Bill Fefferman, Soumik Ghosh, Umesh Vazirani, Chenyi Zhang, and Zixin Zhou

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 287, 15th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2024)


Abstract
Entanglement is a quantum resource, in some ways analogous to randomness in classical computation. Inspired by recent work of Gheorghiu and Hoban, we define the notion of "pseudoentanglement", a property exhibited by ensembles of efficiently constructible quantum states which are indistinguishable from quantum states with maximal entanglement. Our construction relies on the notion of quantum pseudorandom states - first defined by Ji, Liu and Song - which are efficiently constructible states indistinguishable from (maximally entangled) Haar-random states. Specifically, we give a construction of pseudoentangled states with entanglement entropy arbitrarily close to log n across every cut, a tight bound providing an exponential separation between computational vs information theoretic quantum pseudorandomness. We discuss applications of this result to Matrix Product State testing, entanglement distillation, and the complexity of the AdS/CFT correspondence. As compared with a previous version of this manuscript (arXiv:2211.00747v1) this version introduces a new pseudorandom state construction, has a simpler proof of correctness, and achieves a technically stronger result of low entanglement across all cuts simultaneously.

Cite as

Scott Aaronson, Adam Bouland, Bill Fefferman, Soumik Ghosh, Umesh Vazirani, Chenyi Zhang, and Zixin Zhou. Quantum Pseudoentanglement. In 15th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2024). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 287, pp. 2:1-2:21, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2024)


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@InProceedings{aaronson_et_al:LIPIcs.ITCS.2024.2,
  author =	{Aaronson, Scott and Bouland, Adam and Fefferman, Bill and Ghosh, Soumik and Vazirani, Umesh and Zhang, Chenyi and Zhou, Zixin},
  title =	{{Quantum Pseudoentanglement}},
  booktitle =	{15th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2024)},
  pages =	{2:1--2:21},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-309-6},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2024},
  volume =	{287},
  editor =	{Guruswami, Venkatesan},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2024.2},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-195300},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2024.2},
  annote =	{Keywords: Quantum computing, Quantum complexity theory, entanglement}
}
Document
Quantum Merlin-Arthur and Proofs Without Relative Phase

Authors: Roozbeh Bassirian, Bill Fefferman, and Kunal Marwaha

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 287, 15th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2024)


Abstract
We study a variant of QMA where quantum proofs have no relative phase (i.e. non-negative amplitudes, up to a global phase). If only completeness is modified, this class is equal to QMA [Grilo et al., 2014]; but if both completeness and soundness are modified, the class (named QMA+ by Jeronimo and Wu [Jeronimo and Wu, 2023]) can be much more powerful. We show that QMA+ with some constant gap is equal to NEXP, yet QMA+ with some other constant gap is equal to QMA. One interpretation is that Merlin’s ability to "deceive" originates from relative phase at least as much as from entanglement, since QMA(2) ⊆ NEXP.

Cite as

Roozbeh Bassirian, Bill Fefferman, and Kunal Marwaha. Quantum Merlin-Arthur and Proofs Without Relative Phase. In 15th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2024). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 287, pp. 9:1-9:19, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2024)


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@InProceedings{bassirian_et_al:LIPIcs.ITCS.2024.9,
  author =	{Bassirian, Roozbeh and Fefferman, Bill and Marwaha, Kunal},
  title =	{{Quantum Merlin-Arthur and Proofs Without Relative Phase}},
  booktitle =	{15th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2024)},
  pages =	{9:1--9:19},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-309-6},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2024},
  volume =	{287},
  editor =	{Guruswami, Venkatesan},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2024.9},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-195370},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2024.9},
  annote =	{Keywords: quantum complexity, QMA(2), PCPs}
}
Document
On the Power of Nonstandard Quantum Oracles

Authors: Roozbeh Bassirian, Bill Fefferman, and Kunal Marwaha

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 266, 18th Conference on the Theory of Quantum Computation, Communication and Cryptography (TQC 2023)


Abstract
We study how the choices made when designing an oracle affect the complexity of quantum property testing problems defined relative to this oracle. We encode a regular graph of even degree as an invertible function f, and present f in different oracle models. We first give a one-query QMA protocol to test if a graph encoded in f has a small disconnected subset. We then use representation theory to show that no classical witness can help a quantum verifier efficiently decide this problem relative to an in-place oracle. Perhaps surprisingly, a simple modification to the standard oracle prevents a quantum verifier from efficiently deciding this problem, even with access to an unbounded witness.

Cite as

Roozbeh Bassirian, Bill Fefferman, and Kunal Marwaha. On the Power of Nonstandard Quantum Oracles. In 18th Conference on the Theory of Quantum Computation, Communication and Cryptography (TQC 2023). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 266, pp. 11:1-11:25, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2023)


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@InProceedings{bassirian_et_al:LIPIcs.TQC.2023.11,
  author =	{Bassirian, Roozbeh and Fefferman, Bill and Marwaha, Kunal},
  title =	{{On the Power of Nonstandard Quantum Oracles}},
  booktitle =	{18th Conference on the Theory of Quantum Computation, Communication and Cryptography (TQC 2023)},
  pages =	{11:1--11:25},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-283-9},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2023},
  volume =	{266},
  editor =	{Fawzi, Omar and Walter, Michael},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.TQC.2023.11},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-183215},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.TQC.2023.11},
  annote =	{Keywords: quantum complexity, QCMA, expander graphs, representation theory}
}
Document
The Importance of the Spectral Gap in Estimating Ground-State Energies

Authors: Abhinav Deshpande, Alexey V. Gorshkov, and Bill Fefferman

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 215, 13th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2022)


Abstract
The field of quantum Hamiltonian complexity lies at the intersection of quantum many-body physics and computational complexity theory, with deep implications to both fields. The main object of study is the Local Hamiltonian problem, which is concerned with estimating the ground-state energy of a local Hamiltonian and is complete for the class QMA, a quantum generalization of the class NP. A major challenge in the field is to understand the complexity of the Local Hamiltonian problem in more physically natural parameter regimes. One crucial parameter in understanding the ground space of any Hamiltonian in many-body physics is the spectral gap, which is the difference between the smallest two eigenvalues. Despite its importance in quantum many-body physics, the role played by the spectral gap in the complexity of the Local Hamiltonian problem is less well-understood. In this work, we make progress on this question by considering the precise regime, in which one estimates the ground-state energy to within inverse exponential precision. Computing ground-state energies precisely is a task that is important for quantum chemistry and quantum many-body physics. In the setting of inverse-exponential precision (promise gap), there is a surprising result that the complexity of Local Hamiltonian is magnified from QMA to PSPACE, the class of problems solvable in polynomial space (but possibly exponential time). We clarify the reason behind this boost in complexity. Specifically, we show that the full complexity of the high precision case only comes about when the spectral gap is exponentially small. As a consequence of the proof techniques developed to show our results, we uncover important implications for the representability and circuit complexity of ground states of local Hamiltonians, the theory of uniqueness of quantum witnesses, and techniques for the amplification of quantum witnesses in the presence of postselection.

Cite as

Abhinav Deshpande, Alexey V. Gorshkov, and Bill Fefferman. The Importance of the Spectral Gap in Estimating Ground-State Energies. In 13th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2022). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 215, pp. 54:1-54:6, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@InProceedings{deshpande_et_al:LIPIcs.ITCS.2022.54,
  author =	{Deshpande, Abhinav and Gorshkov, Alexey V. and Fefferman, Bill},
  title =	{{The Importance of the Spectral Gap in Estimating Ground-State Energies}},
  booktitle =	{13th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2022)},
  pages =	{54:1--54:6},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-217-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{215},
  editor =	{Braverman, Mark},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2022.54},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-156501},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2022.54},
  annote =	{Keywords: Local Hamiltonian problem, PSPACE, PP, QMA}
}
Document
Quantum Complexity: Theory and Application (Dagstuhl Seminar 21261)

Authors: Bill Fefferman, Sevag Gharibian, Norbert Schuch, and Barbara Terhal

Published in: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 5 (2021)


Abstract
This report documents the program and outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 21261 "Quantum Complexity: Theory and Application". The seminar ran from June 27 to July 2 , 2021, and was held in a hybrid format (due to COVID travel restrictions). Of the 55 total participants from 14 countries, 17 participants were on-site, and 38 were remote. Recent advances in both theoretic and experimental aspects of quantum complexity theory were presented and discussed, ranging from new theoretical developments via a "Quantum Strong Exponential Time Hypothesis", to more experimentally oriented talks involving benchmarking of random circuits in quantum supremacy experiments. In addition, an open problem session and a discussion session regarding the current state of the field were included.

Cite as

Bill Fefferman, Sevag Gharibian, Norbert Schuch, and Barbara Terhal. Quantum Complexity: Theory and Application (Dagstuhl Seminar 21261). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 5, pp. 76-88, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2021)


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@Article{fefferman_et_al:DagRep.11.5.76,
  author =	{Fefferman, Bill and Gharibian, Sevag and Schuch, Norbert and Terhal, Barbara},
  title =	{{Quantum Complexity: Theory and Application (Dagstuhl Seminar 21261)}},
  pages =	{76--88},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2021},
  volume =	{11},
  number =	{5},
  editor =	{Fefferman, Bill and Gharibian, Sevag and Schuch, Norbert and Terhal, Barbara},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.11.5.76},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-155715},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.11.5.76},
  annote =	{Keywords: complexity theory, many-body systems, proof and verification systems, quantum computation, quantum supremacy}
}
Document
Abstract
Computational Pseudorandomness, the Wormhole Growth Paradox, and Constraints on the AdS/CFT Duality (Abstract)

Authors: Adam Bouland, Bill Fefferman, and Umesh Vazirani

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 151, 11th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2020)


Abstract
The AdS/CFT correspondence is central to efforts to reconcile gravity and quantum mechanics, a fundamental goal of physics. It posits a duality between a gravitational theory in Anti de Sitter (AdS) space and a quantum mechanical conformal field theory (CFT), embodied in a map known as the AdS/CFT dictionary mapping states to states and operators to operators. This dictionary map is not well understood and has only been computed on special, structured instances. In this work we introduce cryptographic ideas to the study of AdS/CFT, and provide evidence that either the dictionary must be exponentially hard to compute, or else the quantum Extended Church-Turing thesis must be false in quantum gravity. Our argument has its origins in a fundamental paradox in the AdS/CFT correspondence known as the wormhole growth paradox. The paradox is that the CFT is believed to be "scrambling" - i.e. the expectation value of local operators equilibrates in polynomial time - whereas the gravity theory is not, because the interiors of certain black holes known as "wormholes" do not equilibrate and instead their volume grows at a linear rate for at least an exponential amount of time. So what could be the CFT dual to wormhole volume? Susskind’s proposed resolution was to equate the wormhole volume with the quantum circuit complexity of the CFT state. From a computer science perspective, circuit complexity seems like an unusual choice because it should be difficult to compute, in contrast to physical quantities such as wormhole volume. We show how to create pseudorandom quantum states in the CFT, thereby arguing that their quantum circuit complexity is not "feelable", in the sense that it cannot be approximated by any efficient experiment. This requires a specialized construction inspired by symmetric block ciphers such as DES and AES, since unfortunately existing constructions based on quantum-resistant one way functions cannot be used in the context of the wormhole growth paradox as only very restricted operations are allowed in the CFT. By contrast we argue that the wormhole volume is "feelable" in some general but non-physical sense. The duality between a "feelable" quantity and an "unfeelable" quantity implies that some aspect of this duality must have exponential complexity. More precisely, it implies that either the dictionary is exponentially complex, or else the quantum gravity theory is exponentially difficult to simulate on a quantum computer. While at first sight this might seem to justify the discomfort of complexity theorists with equating computational complexity with a physical quantity, a further examination of our arguments shows that any resolution of the wormhole growth paradox must equate wormhole volume to an "unfeelable" quantity, leading to the same conclusions. In other words this discomfort is an inevitable consequence of the paradox.

Cite as

Adam Bouland, Bill Fefferman, and Umesh Vazirani. Computational Pseudorandomness, the Wormhole Growth Paradox, and Constraints on the AdS/CFT Duality (Abstract). In 11th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2020). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 151, pp. 63:1-63:2, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2020)


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@InProceedings{bouland_et_al:LIPIcs.ITCS.2020.63,
  author =	{Bouland, Adam and Fefferman, Bill and Vazirani, Umesh},
  title =	{{Computational Pseudorandomness, the Wormhole Growth Paradox, and Constraints on the AdS/CFT Duality}},
  booktitle =	{11th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2020)},
  pages =	{63:1--63:2},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-134-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2020},
  volume =	{151},
  editor =	{Vidick, Thomas},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2020.63},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-117486},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2020.63},
  annote =	{Keywords: Quantum complexity theory, pseudorandomness, AdS/CFT correspondence}
}
Document
"Quantum Supremacy" and the Complexity of Random Circuit Sampling

Authors: Adam Bouland, Bill Fefferman, Chinmay Nirkhe, and Umesh Vazirani

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 124, 10th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2019)


Abstract
A critical goal for the field of quantum computation is quantum supremacy - a demonstration of any quantum computation that is prohibitively hard for classical computers. It is both a necessary milestone on the path to useful quantum computers as well as a test of quantum theory in the realm of high complexity. A leading near-term candidate, put forth by the Google/UCSB team, is sampling from the probability distributions of randomly chosen quantum circuits, called Random Circuit Sampling (RCS). While RCS was defined with experimental realization in mind, we give strong complexity-theoretic evidence for the classical hardness of RCS, placing it on par with the best theoretical proposals for supremacy. Specifically, we show that RCS satisfies an average-case hardness condition - computing output probabilities of typical quantum circuits is as hard as computing them in the worst-case, and therefore #P-hard. Our reduction exploits the polynomial structure in the output amplitudes of random quantum circuits, enabled by the Feynman path integral. In addition, it follows from known results that RCS also satisfies an anti-concentration property, namely that errors in estimating output probabilities are small with respect to the probabilities themselves. This makes RCS the first proposal for quantum supremacy with both of these properties. We also give a natural condition under which an existing statistical measure, cross-entropy, verifies RCS, as well as describe a new verification measure which in some formal sense maximizes the information gained from experimental samples.

Cite as

Adam Bouland, Bill Fefferman, Chinmay Nirkhe, and Umesh Vazirani. "Quantum Supremacy" and the Complexity of Random Circuit Sampling. In 10th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 124, pp. 15:1-15:2, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{bouland_et_al:LIPIcs.ITCS.2019.15,
  author =	{Bouland, Adam and Fefferman, Bill and Nirkhe, Chinmay and Vazirani, Umesh},
  title =	{{"Quantum Supremacy" and the Complexity of Random Circuit Sampling}},
  booktitle =	{10th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2019)},
  pages =	{15:1--15:2},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-095-8},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{124},
  editor =	{Blum, Avrim},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2019.15},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-101084},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2019.15},
  annote =	{Keywords: quantum supremacy, average-case hardness, verification}
}
Document
Quantum vs. Classical Proofs and Subset Verification

Authors: Bill Fefferman and Shelby Kimmel

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 117, 43rd International Symposium on Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science (MFCS 2018)


Abstract
We study the ability of efficient quantum verifiers to decide properties of exponentially large subsets given either a classical or quantum witness. We develop a general framework that can be used to prove that QCMA machines, with only classical witnesses, cannot verify certain properties of subsets given implicitly via an oracle. We use this framework to prove an oracle separation between QCMA and QMA using an "in-place" permutation oracle, making the first progress on this question since Aaronson and Kuperberg in 2007 [Aaronson and Kuperberg, 2007]. We also use the framework to prove a particularly simple standard oracle separation between QCMA and AM.

Cite as

Bill Fefferman and Shelby Kimmel. Quantum vs. Classical Proofs and Subset Verification. In 43rd International Symposium on Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science (MFCS 2018). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 117, pp. 22:1-22:23, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@InProceedings{fefferman_et_al:LIPIcs.MFCS.2018.22,
  author =	{Fefferman, Bill and Kimmel, Shelby},
  title =	{{Quantum vs. Classical Proofs and Subset Verification}},
  booktitle =	{43rd International Symposium on Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science (MFCS 2018)},
  pages =	{22:1--22:23},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-086-6},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{117},
  editor =	{Potapov, Igor and Spirakis, Paul and Worrell, James},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.MFCS.2018.22},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-96040},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.MFCS.2018.22},
  annote =	{Keywords: Quantum Complexity Theory, Quantum Proofs}
}
Document
A Complete Characterization of Unitary Quantum Space

Authors: Bill Fefferman and Cedric Yen-Yu Lin

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 94, 9th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2018)


Abstract
Motivated by understanding the power of quantum computation with restricted number of qubits, we give two complete characterizations of unitary quantum space bounded computation. First we show that approximating an element of the inverse of a well-conditioned efficiently encoded 2^k(n) x 2^k(n) matrix is complete for the class of problems solvable by quantum circuits acting on O(k(n)) qubits with all measurements at the end of the computation. Similarly, estimating the minimum eigenvalue of an efficiently encoded Hermitian 2^k(n) x 2^k(n) matrix is also complete for this class. In the logspace case, our results improve on previous results of Ta-Shma by giving new space-efficient quantum algorithms that avoid intermediate measurements, as well as showing matching hardness results. Additionally, as a consequence we show that preciseQMA, the version of QMA with exponentially small completeness-soundess gap, is equal to PSPACE. Thus, the problem of estimating the minimum eigenvalue of a local Hamiltonian to inverse exponential precision is PSPACE-complete, which we show holds even in the frustration-free case. Finally, we can use this characterization to give a provable setting in which the ability to prepare the ground state of a local Hamiltonian is more powerful than the ability to prepare PEPS states. Interestingly, by suitably changing the parameterization of either of these problems we can completely characterize the power of quantum computation with simultaneously bounded time and space.

Cite as

Bill Fefferman and Cedric Yen-Yu Lin. A Complete Characterization of Unitary Quantum Space. In 9th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2018). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 94, pp. 4:1-4:21, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@InProceedings{fefferman_et_al:LIPIcs.ITCS.2018.4,
  author =	{Fefferman, Bill and Lin, Cedric Yen-Yu},
  title =	{{A Complete Characterization of Unitary Quantum Space}},
  booktitle =	{9th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2018)},
  pages =	{4:1--4:21},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-060-6},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{94},
  editor =	{Karlin, Anna R.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2018.4},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-83242},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2018.4},
  annote =	{Keywords: Quantum complexity, space complexity, complete problems, QMA}
}
Document
On the Power of Quantum Fourier Sampling

Authors: Bill Fefferman and Christopher Umans

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 61, 11th Conference on the Theory of Quantum Computation, Communication and Cryptography (TQC 2016)


Abstract
A line of work initiated by Terhal and DiVincenzo [Terhal/DiVincenzo, arXiv, 2002] and Bremner, Jozsa, and Shepherd [Bremner/Jozsa/Sheperd, Proc. Royal Soc. A, 2010], shows that restricted classes of quantum computation can efficiently sample from probability distributions that cannot be exactly sampled efficiently on a classical computer, unless the PH collapses. Aaronson and Arkhipov [Aaronson/Arkhipov, J. Theory of Comp., 2013] take this further by considering a distribution that can be sampled efficiently by linear optical quantum computation, that under two feasible conjectures, cannot even be approximately sampled within bounded total variation distance, unless the PH collapses. In this work we use Quantum Fourier Sampling to construct a class of distributions that can be sampled exactly by a quantum computer. We then argue that these distributions cannot be approximately sampled classically, unless the PH collapses, under variants of the Aaronson-Arkhipov conjectures. In particular, we show a general class of quantumly sampleable distributions each of which is based on an "Efficiently Specifiable" polynomial, for which a classical approximate sampler implies an average-case approximation. This class of polynomials contains the Permanent but also includes, for example, the Hamiltonian Cycle polynomial, as well as many other familiar #P-hard polynomials. Since our distribution likely requires the full power of universal quantum computation, while the Aaronson-Arkhipov distribution uses only linear optical quantum computation with noninteracting bosons, why is our result interesting? We can think of at least three reasons: 1. Since the conjectures required in [Aaronson/Arkhipov, J. Theory of Comp., 2013] have not yet been proven, it seems worthwhile to weaken them as much as possible. We do this in two ways, by weakening both conjectures to apply to any "Efficiently Specifiable" polynomial, and by weakening the so-called Anti-Concentration conjecture so that it need only hold for one distribution in a broad class of distributions. 2. Our construction can be understood without any knowledge of linear optics. While this may be a disadvantage for experimentalists, in our opinion it results in a very clean and simple exposition that may be more immediately accessible to computer scientists. 3. It is extremely common for quantum computations to employ “Quantum Fourier Sampling” in the following way: first apply a classically efficient function to a uniform superposition of inputs, then apply a Quantum Fourier Transform followed by a measurement. Our distributions are obtained in exactly this way, where the classically efficient function is related to a (presumed) hard polynomial. Establishing rigorously a robust sense in which the central primitive of Quantum Fourier Sampling is classically hard seems a worthwhile goal in itself.

Cite as

Bill Fefferman and Christopher Umans. On the Power of Quantum Fourier Sampling. In 11th Conference on the Theory of Quantum Computation, Communication and Cryptography (TQC 2016). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 61, pp. 1:1-1:19, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2016)


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@InProceedings{fefferman_et_al:LIPIcs.TQC.2016.1,
  author =	{Fefferman, Bill and Umans, Christopher},
  title =	{{On the Power of Quantum Fourier Sampling}},
  booktitle =	{11th Conference on the Theory of Quantum Computation, Communication and Cryptography (TQC 2016)},
  pages =	{1:1--1:19},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-019-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2016},
  volume =	{61},
  editor =	{Broadbent, Anne},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.TQC.2016.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-66829},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.TQC.2016.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: Quantum Complexity Theory, Sampling Complexity}
}
Document
Space-Efficient Error Reduction for Unitary Quantum Computations

Authors: Bill Fefferman, Hirotada Kobayashi, Cedric Yen-Yu Lin, Tomoyuki Morimae, and Harumichi Nishimura

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 55, 43rd International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2016)


Abstract
This paper presents a general space-efficient method for error reduction for unitary quantum computation. Consider a polynomial-time quantum computation with completeness c and soundness s, either with or without a witness (corresponding to QMA and BQP, respectively). To convert this computation into a new computation with error at most 2^{-p}, the most space-efficient method known requires extra workspace of O(p*log(1/(c-s))) qubits. This space requirement is too large for scenarios like logarithmic-space quantum computations. This paper shows an errorreduction method for unitary quantum computations (i.e., computations without intermediate measurements) that requires extra workspace of just O(log(p/(c-s))) qubits. This in particular gives the first method of strong amplification for logarithmic-space unitary quantum computations with two-sided bounded error. This also leads to a number of consequences in complexity theory, such as the uselessness of quantum witnesses in bounded-error logarithmic-space unitary quantum computations, the PSPACE upper bound for QMA with exponentially-small completeness-soundness gap, and strong amplification for matchgate computations.

Cite as

Bill Fefferman, Hirotada Kobayashi, Cedric Yen-Yu Lin, Tomoyuki Morimae, and Harumichi Nishimura. Space-Efficient Error Reduction for Unitary Quantum Computations. In 43rd International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2016). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 55, pp. 14:1-14:14, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2016)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@InProceedings{fefferman_et_al:LIPIcs.ICALP.2016.14,
  author =	{Fefferman, Bill and Kobayashi, Hirotada and Yen-Yu Lin, Cedric and Morimae, Tomoyuki and Nishimura, Harumichi},
  title =	{{Space-Efficient Error Reduction for Unitary Quantum Computations}},
  booktitle =	{43rd International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2016)},
  pages =	{14:1--14:14},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-013-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2016},
  volume =	{55},
  editor =	{Chatzigiannakis, Ioannis and Mitzenmacher, Michael and Rabani, Yuval and Sangiorgi, Davide},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ICALP.2016.14},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-62975},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ICALP.2016.14},
  annote =	{Keywords: space-bounded computation, quantum Merlin-Arthur proof systems, error reduction, quantum computing}
}
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