41 Search Results for "Donaldson, Alastair F."


Volume

LIPIcs, Volume 134

33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)

ECOOP 2019, July 15-19, 2019, London, United Kingdom

Editors: Alastair F. Donaldson

Document
Artifact
Putting Randomized Compiler Testing into Production (Artifact)

Authors: Alastair F. Donaldson, Hugues Evrard, and Paul Thomson

Published in: DARTS, Volume 6, Issue 2, Special Issue of the 34th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2020)


Abstract
This artifact accompanies our experience report for our compiler testing technology transfer project: taking the GraphicsFuzz research project on randomized metamorphic testing of graphics shader compilers, and building the necessary tooling around it to provide a highly automated process for improving the Khronos Vulkan Conformance Test Suite (CTS) with test cases that expose fuzzer-found compiler bugs, or that plug gaps in test coverage. The artifact consists of two Dockerfiles and associated files that can be used to build two Docker containers. The containers include our main tool for performing fuzzing: gfauto. The containers allow the user to fuzz SwiftShader, a software Vulkan implementation, finding 4 bugs. The user will also perform some line coverage analysis of SwiftShader using our tools to synthesize a small test that increases line coverage. Ubuntu, gfauto, SwiftShader, and other dependencies inside the Docker containers are fixed at specific versions, and all random seeds are set to specific values. Thus, all examples should reproduce faithfully on any machine.

Cite as

Alastair F. Donaldson, Hugues Evrard, and Paul Thomson. Putting Randomized Compiler Testing into Production (Artifact). In Special Issue of the 34th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2020). Dagstuhl Artifacts Series (DARTS), Volume 6, Issue 2, pp. 3:1-3:2, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2020)


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@Article{donaldson_et_al:DARTS.6.2.3,
  author =	{Donaldson, Alastair F. and Evrard, Hugues and Thomson, Paul},
  title =	{{Putting Randomized Compiler Testing into Production (Artifact)}},
  pages =	{3:1--3:2},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Artifacts Series},
  ISSN =	{2509-8195},
  year =	{2020},
  volume =	{6},
  number =	{2},
  editor =	{Donaldson, Alastair F. and Evrard, Hugues and Thomson, Paul},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DARTS.6.2.3},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-132005},
  doi =		{10.4230/DARTS.6.2.3},
  annote =	{Keywords: Compilers, metamorphic testing, 3D graphics, experience report}
}
Document
Tool Insights Paper
Test-Case Reduction via Test-Case Generation: Insights from the Hypothesis Reducer (Tool Insights Paper)

Authors: David R. MacIver and Alastair F. Donaldson

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 166, 34th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2020)


Abstract
We describe internal test-case reduction, the method of test-case reduction employed by Hypothesis, a widely-used property-based testing library for Python. The key idea of internal test-case reduction is that instead of applying test-case reduction externally to generated test cases, we apply it internally, to the sequence of random choices made during generation, so that a test case is reduced by continually re-generating smaller and simpler test cases that continue to trigger some property of interest (e.g. a bug in the system under test). This allows for fully generic test-case reduction without any user intervention and without the need to write a specific test-case reducer for a particular application domain. It also significantly mitigates the impact of the test-case validity problem, by ensuring that any reduced test case is one that could in principle have been generated. We describe the rationale behind this approach, explain its implementation in Hypothesis, and present an extensive evaluation comparing its effectiveness with that of several other test-case reducers, including C-Reduce and delta debugging, on applications including Python auto-formatting, C compilers, and the SymPy symbolic math library. Our hope is that these insights into the reduction mechanism employed by Hypothesis will be useful to researchers interested in randomized testing and test-case reduction, as the crux of the approach is fully generic and should be applicable to any random generator of test cases.

Cite as

David R. MacIver and Alastair F. Donaldson. Test-Case Reduction via Test-Case Generation: Insights from the Hypothesis Reducer (Tool Insights Paper). In 34th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2020). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 166, pp. 13:1-13:27, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2020)


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@InProceedings{maciver_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2020.13,
  author =	{MacIver, David R. and Donaldson, Alastair F.},
  title =	{{Test-Case Reduction via Test-Case Generation: Insights from the Hypothesis Reducer}},
  booktitle =	{34th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2020)},
  pages =	{13:1--13:27},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-154-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2020},
  volume =	{166},
  editor =	{Hirschfeld, Robert and Pape, Tobias},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2020.13},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-131700},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2020.13},
  annote =	{Keywords: Software testing, test-case reduction}
}
Document
Experience Report
Putting Randomized Compiler Testing into Production (Experience Report)

Authors: Alastair F. Donaldson, Hugues Evrard, and Paul Thomson

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 166, 34th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2020)


Abstract
We describe our experience over the last 18 months on a compiler testing technology transfer project: taking the GraphicsFuzz research project on randomized metamorphic testing of graphics shader compilers, and building the necessary tooling around it to provide a highly automated process for improving the Khronos Vulkan Conformance Test Suite (CTS) with test cases that expose fuzzer-found compiler bugs, or that plug gaps in test coverage. We present this tooling for test automation - gfauto - in detail, as well as our use of differential coverage and test case reduction as a method for automatically synthesizing tests that fill coverage gaps. We explain the value that GraphicsFuzz has provided in automatically testing the ecosystem of tools for transforming, optimizing and validating Vulkan shaders, and the challenges faced when testing a tool ecosystem rather than a single tool. We discuss practical issues associated with putting automated metamorphic testing into production, related to test case validity, bug de-duplication and floating-point precision, and provide illustrative examples of bugs found during our work.

Cite as

Alastair F. Donaldson, Hugues Evrard, and Paul Thomson. Putting Randomized Compiler Testing into Production (Experience Report). In 34th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2020). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 166, pp. 22:1-22:29, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2020)


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@InProceedings{donaldson_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2020.22,
  author =	{Donaldson, Alastair F. and Evrard, Hugues and Thomson, Paul},
  title =	{{Putting Randomized Compiler Testing into Production}},
  booktitle =	{34th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2020)},
  pages =	{22:1--22:29},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-154-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2020},
  volume =	{166},
  editor =	{Hirschfeld, Robert and Pape, Tobias},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2020.22},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-131791},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2020.22},
  annote =	{Keywords: Compilers, metamorphic testing, 3D graphics, experience report}
}
Document
Complete Volume
LIPIcs, Volume 134, ECOOP'19, Complete Volume

Authors: Alastair F. Donaldson

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 134, 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)


Abstract
LIPIcs, Volume 134, ECOOP'19, Complete Volume

Cite as

Alastair F. Donaldson. LIPIcs, Volume 134, ECOOP'19, Complete Volume. In 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 134, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Proceedings{donaldson:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019,
  title =	{{LIPIcs, Volume 134, ECOOP'19, Complete Volume}},
  booktitle =	{33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-111-5},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{134},
  editor =	{Donaldson, Alastair F.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-108979},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019},
  annote =	{Keywords: Software and its engineering}
}
Document
Eventually Sound Points-To Analysis with Specifications

Authors: Osbert Bastani, Rahul Sharma, Lazaro Clapp, Saswat Anand, and Alex Aiken

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 134, 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)


Abstract
Static analyses make the increasingly tenuous assumption that all source code is available for analysis; for example, large libraries often call into native code that cannot be analyzed. We propose a points-to analysis that initially makes optimistic assumptions about missing code, and then inserts runtime checks that report counterexamples to these assumptions that occur during execution. Our approach guarantees eventual soundness, which combines two guarantees: (i) the runtime checks are guaranteed to catch the first counterexample that occurs during any execution, in which case execution can be terminated to prevent harm, and (ii) only finitely many counterexamples ever occur, implying that the static analysis eventually becomes statically sound with respect to all remaining executions. We implement Optix, an eventually sound points-to analysis for Android apps, where the Android framework is missing. We show that the runtime checks added by Optix incur low overhead on real programs, and demonstrate how Optix improves a client information flow analysis for detecting Android malware.

Cite as

Osbert Bastani, Rahul Sharma, Lazaro Clapp, Saswat Anand, and Alex Aiken. Eventually Sound Points-To Analysis with Specifications. In 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 134, pp. 11:1-11:28, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{bastani_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.11,
  author =	{Bastani, Osbert and Sharma, Rahul and Clapp, Lazaro and Anand, Saswat and Aiken, Alex},
  title =	{{Eventually Sound Points-To Analysis with Specifications}},
  booktitle =	{33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)},
  pages =	{11:1--11:28},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-111-5},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{134},
  editor =	{Donaldson, Alastair F.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.11},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-108038},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.11},
  annote =	{Keywords: specification inference, static points-to analysis, runtime monitoring}
}
Document
Lifestate: Event-Driven Protocols and Callback Control Flow

Authors: Shawn Meier, Sergio Mover, and Bor-Yuh Evan Chang

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 134, 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)


Abstract
Developing interactive applications (apps) against event-driven software frameworks such as Android is notoriously difficult. To create apps that behave as expected, developers must follow complex and often implicit asynchronous programming protocols. Such protocols intertwine the proper registering of callbacks to receive control from the framework with appropriate application-programming interface (API) calls that in turn affect the set of possible future callbacks. An app violates the protocol when, for example, it calls a particular API method in a state of the framework where such a call is invalid. What makes automated reasoning hard in this domain is largely what makes programming apps against such frameworks hard: the specification of the protocol is unclear, and the control flow is complex, asynchronous, and higher-order. In this paper, we tackle the problem of specifying and modeling event-driven application-programming protocols. In particular, we formalize a core meta-model that captures the dialogue between event-driven frameworks and application callbacks. Based on this meta-model, we define a language called lifestate that permits precise and formal descriptions of application-programming protocols and the callback control flow imposed by the event-driven framework. Lifestate unifies modeling what app callbacks can expect of the framework with specifying rules the app must respect when calling into the framework. In this way, we effectively combine lifecycle constraints and typestate rules. To evaluate the effectiveness of lifestate modeling, we provide a dynamic verification algorithm that takes as input a trace of execution of an app and a lifestate protocol specification to either produce a trace witnessing a protocol violation or a proof that no such trace is realizable.

Cite as

Shawn Meier, Sergio Mover, and Bor-Yuh Evan Chang. Lifestate: Event-Driven Protocols and Callback Control Flow. In 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 134, pp. 1:1-1:29, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{meier_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.1,
  author =	{Meier, Shawn and Mover, Sergio and Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan},
  title =	{{Lifestate: Event-Driven Protocols and Callback Control Flow}},
  booktitle =	{33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)},
  pages =	{1:1--1:29},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-111-5},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{134},
  editor =	{Donaldson, Alastair F.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-107932},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: event-driven systems, application-programming protocols, application framework interfaces, callbacks, sound framework modeling, predictive dynamic verification}
}
Document
On Satisfiability of Nominal Subtyping with Variance

Authors: Aleksandr Misonizhnik and Dmitry Mordvinov

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 134, 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)


Abstract
Nominal type systems with variance, the core of the subtyping relation in object-oriented programming languages like Java, C# and Scala, have been extensively studied by Kennedy and Pierce: they have shown the undecidability of the subtyping between ground types and proposed the decidable fragments of such type systems. However, modular verification of object-oriented code may require reasoning about the relations of open types. In this paper, we formalize and investigate the satisfiability problem for nominal subtyping with variance. We define the problem in the context of first-order logic. We show that although the non-expansive ground nominal subtyping with variance is decidable, its satisfiability problem is undecidable. Our proof uses a remarkably small fragment of the type system. In fact, we demonstrate that even for the non-expansive class tables with only nullary and unary covariant and invariant type constructors, the satisfiability of quantifier-free conjunctions of positive subtyping atoms is undecidable. We discuss this result in detail, as well as show one decidable fragment and a scheme for obtaining other decidable fragments.

Cite as

Aleksandr Misonizhnik and Dmitry Mordvinov. On Satisfiability of Nominal Subtyping with Variance. In 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 134, pp. 7:1-7:20, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{misonizhnik_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.7,
  author =	{Misonizhnik, Aleksandr and Mordvinov, Dmitry},
  title =	{{On Satisfiability of Nominal Subtyping with Variance}},
  booktitle =	{33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)},
  pages =	{7:1--7:20},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-111-5},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{134},
  editor =	{Donaldson, Alastair F.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.7},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-107997},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.7},
  annote =	{Keywords: nominal type systems, structural subtyping, first-order logic, decidability, software verification}
}
Document
Pearl
Finally, a Polymorphic Linear Algebra Language (Pearl)

Authors: Amir Shaikhha and Lionel Parreaux

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 134, 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)


Abstract
Many different data analytics tasks boil down to linear algebra primitives. In practice, for each different type of workload, data scientists use a particular specialised library. In this paper, we present Pilatus, a polymorphic iterative linear algebra language, applicable to various types of data analytics workloads. The design of this domain-specific language (DSL) is inspired by both mathematics and programming languages: its basic constructs are borrowed from abstract algebra, whereas the key technology behind its polymorphic design uses the tagless final approach (a.k.a. polymorphic embedding/object algebras). This design enables us to change the behaviour of arithmetic operations to express matrix algebra, graph algorithms, logical probabilistic programs, and differentiable programs. Crucially, the polymorphic design of Pilatus allows us to use multi-stage programming and rewrite-based optimisation to recover the performance of specialised code, supporting fixed sized matrices, algebraic optimisations, and fusion.

Cite as

Amir Shaikhha and Lionel Parreaux. Finally, a Polymorphic Linear Algebra Language (Pearl). In 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 134, pp. 25:1-25:29, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{shaikhha_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.25,
  author =	{Shaikhha, Amir and Parreaux, Lionel},
  title =	{{Finally, a Polymorphic Linear Algebra Language}},
  booktitle =	{33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)},
  pages =	{25:1--25:29},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-111-5},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{134},
  editor =	{Donaldson, Alastair F.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.25},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-108172},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.25},
  annote =	{Keywords: Linear Algebra, Domain-Specific Languages, Tagless Final, Polymorphic Embedding, Object Algebra, Multi-Stage Programming, Graph Processing, Probabilistic Programming, Automatic Differentiation}
}
Document
NumLin: Linear Types for Linear Algebra

Authors: Dhruv C. Makwana and Neelakantan R. Krishnaswami

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 134, 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)


Abstract
We present NumLin, a functional programming language whose type system is designed to enforce the safe usage of the APIs of low-level linear algebra libraries (such as BLAS/LAPACK). We do so through a brief description of its key features and several illustrative examples. We show that NumLin’s type system is sound and that its implementation improves upon naïve implementations of linear algebra programs, almost towards C-levels of performance. By doing so, we demonstrate (a) that linear types are well-suited to expressing the APIs of low-level linear algebra libraries accurately and concisely and (b) that, despite the complexity of prior work on it, fractional permissions can actually be implemented using simple, well-known techniques and be used practically in real programs.

Cite as

Dhruv C. Makwana and Neelakantan R. Krishnaswami. NumLin: Linear Types for Linear Algebra. In 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 134, pp. 14:1-14:25, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{makwana_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.14,
  author =	{Makwana, Dhruv C. and Krishnaswami, Neelakantan R.},
  title =	{{NumLin: Linear Types for Linear Algebra}},
  booktitle =	{33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)},
  pages =	{14:1--14:25},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-111-5},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{134},
  editor =	{Donaldson, Alastair F.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.14},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-108069},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.14},
  annote =	{Keywords: numerical, linear, algebra, types, permissions, OCaml}
}
Document
Pearl
Julia’s Efficient Algorithm for Subtyping Unions and Covariant Tuples (Pearl)

Authors: Benjamin Chung, Francesco Zappa Nardelli, and Jan Vitek

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 134, 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)


Abstract
The Julia programming language supports multiple dispatch and provides a rich type annotation language to specify method applicability. When multiple methods are applicable for a given call, Julia relies on subtyping between method signatures to pick the correct method to invoke. Julia’s subtyping algorithm is surprisingly complex, and determining whether it is correct remains an open question. In this paper, we focus on one piece of this problem: the interaction between union types and covariant tuples. Previous work normalized unions inside tuples to disjunctive normal form. However, this strategy has two drawbacks: complex type signatures induce space explosion, and interference between normalization and other features of Julia’s type system. In this paper, we describe the algorithm that Julia uses to compute subtyping between tuples and unions - an algorithm that is immune to space explosion and plays well with other features of the language. We prove this algorithm correct and complete against a semantic-subtyping denotational model in Coq.

Cite as

Benjamin Chung, Francesco Zappa Nardelli, and Jan Vitek. Julia’s Efficient Algorithm for Subtyping Unions and Covariant Tuples (Pearl). In 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 134, pp. 24:1-24:15, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{chung_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.24,
  author =	{Chung, Benjamin and Zappa Nardelli, Francesco and Vitek, Jan},
  title =	{{Julia’s Efficient Algorithm for Subtyping Unions and Covariant Tuples}},
  booktitle =	{33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)},
  pages =	{24:1--24:15},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-111-5},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{134},
  editor =	{Donaldson, Alastair F.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.24},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-108165},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.24},
  annote =	{Keywords: Type systems, Subtyping, Union types}
}
Document
Tool Insights Paper
MagpieBridge: A General Approach to Integrating Static Analyses into IDEs and Editors (Tool Insights Paper)

Authors: Linghui Luo, Julian Dolby, and Eric Bodden

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 134, 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)


Abstract
In the past, many static analyses have been created in academia, but only a few of them have found widespread use in industry. Those analyses which are adopted by developers usually have IDE support in the form of plugins, without which developers have no convenient mechanism to use the analysis. Hence, the key to making static analyses more accessible to developers is to integrate the analyses into IDEs and editors. However, integrating static analyses into IDEs is non-trivial: different IDEs have different UI workflows and APIs, expertise in those matters is required to write such plugins, and analysis experts are not typically familiar with doing this. As a result, especially in academia, most analysis tools are headless and only have command-line interfaces. To make static analyses more usable, we propose MagpieBridge - a general approach to integrating static analyses into IDEs and editors. MagpieBridge reduces the mxn complexity problem of integrating m analyses into n IDEs to m+n complexity because each analysis and type of plugin need be done just once for MagpieBridge itself. We demonstrate our approach by integrating two existing analyses, Ariadne and CogniCrypt, into IDEs; these two analyses illustrate the generality of MagpieBridge, as they are based on different program analysis frameworks - WALA and Soot respectively - for different application areas - machine learning and security - and different programming languages - Python and Java. We show further generality of MagpieBridge by using multiple popular IDEs and editors, such as Eclipse, IntelliJ, PyCharm, Jupyter, Sublime Text and even Emacs and Vim.

Cite as

Linghui Luo, Julian Dolby, and Eric Bodden. MagpieBridge: A General Approach to Integrating Static Analyses into IDEs and Editors (Tool Insights Paper). In 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 134, pp. 21:1-21:25, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{luo_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.21,
  author =	{Luo, Linghui and Dolby, Julian and Bodden, Eric},
  title =	{{MagpieBridge: A General Approach to Integrating Static Analyses into IDEs and Editors}},
  booktitle =	{33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)},
  pages =	{21:1--21:25},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-111-5},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{134},
  editor =	{Donaldson, Alastair F.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.21},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-108139},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.21},
  annote =	{Keywords: IDE, Tool Support, Static Analysis, Language Server Protocol}
}
Document
Fling - A Fluent API Generator

Authors: Yossi Gil and Ori Roth

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 134, 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)


Abstract
We present the first general and practical solution of the fluent API problem - an algorithm, that given a deterministic language (equivalently, LR(k), k >= 0 language) encodes it in an unbounded parametric polymorphism type system employing only a polynomial number of types. The theoretical result is accompanied by an actual tool Fling - a fluent API compiler-compiler in the venue of YACC, tailored for embedding DSLs in Java.

Cite as

Yossi Gil and Ori Roth. Fling - A Fluent API Generator. In 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 134, pp. 13:1-13:25, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{gil_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.13,
  author =	{Gil, Yossi and Roth, Ori},
  title =	{{Fling - A Fluent API Generator}},
  booktitle =	{33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)},
  pages =	{13:1--13:25},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-111-5},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{134},
  editor =	{Donaldson, Alastair F.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.13},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-108053},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.13},
  annote =	{Keywords: fluent API, type system, compilation, code generation}
}
Document
How to Avoid Making a Billion-Dollar Mistake: Type-Safe Data Plane Programming with SafeP4

Authors: Matthias Eichholz, Eric Campbell, Nate Foster, Guido Salvaneschi, and Mira Mezini

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 134, 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)


Abstract
The P4 programming language offers high-level, declarative abstractions that bring the flexibility of software to the domain of networking. Unfortunately, the main abstraction used to represent packet data in P4, namely header types, lacks basic safety guarantees. Over the last few years, experience with an increasing number of programs has shown the risks of the unsafe approach, which often leads to subtle software bugs. This paper proposes SafeP4, a domain-specific language for programmable data planes in which all packet data is guaranteed to have a well-defined meaning and satisfy essential safety guarantees. We equip SafeP4 with a formal semantics and a static type system that statically guarantees header validity - a common source of safety bugs according to our analysis of real-world P4 programs. Statically ensuring header validity is challenging because the set of valid headers can be modified at runtime, making it a dynamic program property. Our type system achieves static safety by using a form of path-sensitive reasoning that tracks dynamic information from conditional statements, routing tables, and the control plane. Our evaluation shows that SafeP4’s type system can effectively eliminate common failures in many real-world programs.

Cite as

Matthias Eichholz, Eric Campbell, Nate Foster, Guido Salvaneschi, and Mira Mezini. How to Avoid Making a Billion-Dollar Mistake: Type-Safe Data Plane Programming with SafeP4. In 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 134, pp. 12:1-12:28, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{eichholz_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.12,
  author =	{Eichholz, Matthias and Campbell, Eric and Foster, Nate and Salvaneschi, Guido and Mezini, Mira},
  title =	{{How to Avoid Making a Billion-Dollar Mistake: Type-Safe Data Plane Programming with SafeP4}},
  booktitle =	{33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)},
  pages =	{12:1--12:28},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-111-5},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{134},
  editor =	{Donaldson, Alastair F.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.12},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-108041},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.12},
  annote =	{Keywords: P4, data plane programming, type systems}
}
Document
Scopes and Frames Improve Meta-Interpreter Specialization

Authors: Vlad Vergu, Andrew Tolmach, and Eelco Visser

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 134, 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)


Abstract
DynSem is a domain-specific language for concise specification of the dynamic semantics of programming languages, aimed at rapid experimentation and evolution of language designs. To maintain a short definition-to-execution cycle, DynSem specifications are meta-interpreted. Meta-interpretation introduces runtime overhead that is difficult to remove by using interpreter optimization frameworks such as the Truffle/Graal Java tools; previous work has shown order-of-magnitude improvements from applying Truffle/Graal to a meta-interpreter, but this is still far slower than what can be achieved with a language-specific interpreter. In this paper, we show how specifying the meta-interpreter using scope graphs, which encapsulate static name binding and resolution information, produces much better optimization results from Truffle/Graal. Furthermore, we identify that JIT compilation is hindered by large numbers of calls between small polymorphic rules and we introduce rule cloning to derive larger monomorphic rules at run time as a countermeasure. Our contributions improve the performance of DynSem-derived interpreters to within an order of magnitude of a handwritten language-specific interpreter.

Cite as

Vlad Vergu, Andrew Tolmach, and Eelco Visser. Scopes and Frames Improve Meta-Interpreter Specialization. In 33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 134, pp. 4:1-4:30, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{vergu_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.4,
  author =	{Vergu, Vlad and Tolmach, Andrew and Visser, Eelco},
  title =	{{Scopes and Frames Improve Meta-Interpreter Specialization}},
  booktitle =	{33rd European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2019)},
  pages =	{4:1--4:30},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-111-5},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{134},
  editor =	{Donaldson, Alastair F.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.4},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-107969},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2019.4},
  annote =	{Keywords: Definitional interpreters, partial evaluation}
}
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