29 Search Results for "Vafeiadis, Viktor"


Document
Polynomial-Time Verification and Testing of Implementations of the Snapshot Data Structure

Authors: Gal Amram, Avi Hayoun, Lior Mizrahi, and Gera Weiss

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 246, 36th International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2022)


Abstract
We analyze correctness of implementations of the snapshot data structure in terms of linearizability. We show that such implementations can be verified in polynomial time. Additionally, we identify a set of representative executions for testing and show that the correctness of each of these executions can be validated in linear time. These results present a significant speedup considering that verifying linearizability of implementations of concurrent data structures, in general, is EXPSPACE-complete in the number of program-states, and testing linearizability is NP-complete in the length of the tested execution. The crux of our approach is identifying a class of executions, which we call simple, such that a snapshot implementation is linearizable if and only if all of its simple executions are linearizable. We then divide all possible non-linearizable simple executions into three categories and construct a small automaton that recognizes each category. We describe two implementations (one for verification and one for testing) of an automata-based approach that we develop based on this result and an evaluation that demonstrates significant improvements over existing tools. For verification, we show that restricting a state-of-the-art tool to analyzing only simple executions saves resources and allows the analysis of more complex cases. Specifically, restricting attention to simple executions finds bugs in 27 instances, whereas, without this restriction, we were only able to find 14 of the 30 bugs in the instances we examined. We also show that our technique accelerates testing performance significantly. Specifically, our implementation solves the complete set of 900 problems we generated, whereas the state-of-the-art linearizability testing tool solves only 554 problems.

Cite as

Gal Amram, Avi Hayoun, Lior Mizrahi, and Gera Weiss. Polynomial-Time Verification and Testing of Implementations of the Snapshot Data Structure. In 36th International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2022). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 246, pp. 5:1-5:20, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@InProceedings{amram_et_al:LIPIcs.DISC.2022.5,
  author =	{Amram, Gal and Hayoun, Avi and Mizrahi, Lior and Weiss, Gera},
  title =	{{Polynomial-Time Verification and Testing of Implementations of the Snapshot Data Structure}},
  booktitle =	{36th International Symposium on Distributed Computing (DISC 2022)},
  pages =	{5:1--5:20},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-255-6},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{246},
  editor =	{Scheideler, Christian},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.DISC.2022.5},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-171964},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.DISC.2022.5},
  annote =	{Keywords: Snapshot, Linearizability, Verification, Formal Methods}
}
Document
Invited Talk
Concurrent Separation Logics: Logical Abstraction, Logical Atomicity and Environment Liveness Conditions (Invited Talk)

Authors: Philippa Gardner

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 243, 33rd International Conference on Concurrency Theory (CONCUR 2022)


Abstract
Scalable verification for concurrent programs with shared memory is a long-standing, difficult problem. In 2004, O'Hearn and Brookes introduced concurrent separation logic to provide compositional reasoning about coarse-grained concurrent programs with synchronisation primitives (Gödel prize, 2016). In 2010, I introduced logical abstraction (the fiction of separation) to CSL, developing the CAP logic for reasoning about fine-grained concurrent programs in general and fine-grained lock algorithms in particular. In one logic, it was possible to provide two-sided specifications of concurrent operations, with formally verified implementations and clients. In 2014, I introduced logical atomicity (the fiction of atomicity) to concurrent separation logics, developing the TaDA logic to capture when individual operations behave atomically. Unlike CAP, where synchronisation primitives leak into the specifications, with TaDA the specifications are "just right" in that they provide more general atomic functions specifications to capture, for example, the full behaviour of lock operations. In 2021, I introduced environment liveness conditions to concurrent separation logics, developing the TaDA Live logic for reasoning compositionally about the termination of blocking fine-grained concurrent programs. The crucial challenge is how to deal with abstract atomic blocking: that is, abstract atomic operations that have blocking behaviour arising from busy-waiting patterns as found in, for example, fine-grained spin locks. The fundamental innovation is with the design of abstract specifications that capture this blocking behaviour as liveness assumptions on the environment. In this talk, I will explain this on-going journey in the wonderful world of concurrent separation logics. I will also explain why I have a bright green office chair in the corner of my office, patterned in gold lamé. Many thanks to my fabulous coauthors on concurrent separation logics: Thomas Dinsdale-Young, Emanuele D'Osualdo, Mike Dodds, Azadeh Farzan, Matthew Parkinson, Pedro da Rocha Pinto, Julian Sutherland, Viktor Vafeiadis and more. Suggested Reading: - Peter O'Hearn: Resources, Concurrency and Local Reasoning, Journal of Theoretical Computer Science, Festschrift for John C Reynolds 70th birthday, 2007. - Thomas Dinsdale-Young, Pedro da Rocha Pinto and Philippa Gardner: A Perspective on Specifying and Verifying Concurrent Modules, Journal of Logical and Algebraic Methods in Programming, 2018. - Emanuele D'Osualdo, Azadeh Farzan, Philippa Gardner and Julian Sutherland: TaDA Live: Compositional Reasoning for Termination of Fine-grained Concurrent Programs, ACM Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems (TOPLAS), 2021.

Cite as

Philippa Gardner. Concurrent Separation Logics: Logical Abstraction, Logical Atomicity and Environment Liveness Conditions (Invited Talk). In 33rd International Conference on Concurrency Theory (CONCUR 2022). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 243, p. 2:1, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@InProceedings{gardner:LIPIcs.CONCUR.2022.2,
  author =	{Gardner, Philippa},
  title =	{{Concurrent Separation Logics: Logical Abstraction, Logical Atomicity and Environment Liveness Conditions}},
  booktitle =	{33rd International Conference on Concurrency Theory (CONCUR 2022)},
  pages =	{2:1--2:1},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-246-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{243},
  editor =	{Klin, Bartek and Lasota, S{\l}awomir and Muscholl, Anca},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.CONCUR.2022.2},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-170659},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.CONCUR.2022.2},
  annote =	{Keywords: Concurrent separation logic}
}
Document
Artifact
Compiling Volatile Correctly in Java (Artifact)

Authors: Shuyang Liu, John Bender, and Jens Palsberg

Published in: DARTS, Volume 8, Issue 2, Special Issue of the 36th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2022)


Abstract
The compilation scheme for Volatile accesses in the OpenJDK 9 HotSpot Java Virtual Machine has a major problem that persists despite a recent bug report and a long discussion. One of the suggested fixes is to let Java compile Volatile accesses in the same way as C/C++11. However, we show that this approach is invalid for Java. Indeed, we show a set of optimizations that is valid for C/C++11 but invalid for Java, while the compilation scheme is similar. We prove the correctness of the compilation scheme to Power and x86 and a suite of valid optimizations in Java. Our proofs are based on a language model that we validate by proving key properties such as the DRF-SC theorem and by running litmus tests via our implementation of Java in Herd7.

Cite as

Shuyang Liu, John Bender, and Jens Palsberg. Compiling Volatile Correctly in Java (Artifact). In Special Issue of the 36th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2022). Dagstuhl Artifacts Series (DARTS), Volume 8, Issue 2, pp. 3:1-3:2, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@Article{liu_et_al:DARTS.8.2.3,
  author =	{Liu, Shuyang and Bender, John and Palsberg, Jens},
  title =	{{Compiling Volatile Correctly in Java (Artifact)}},
  pages =	{3:1--3:2},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Artifacts Series},
  ISSN =	{2509-8195},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{2},
  editor =	{Liu, Shuyang and Bender, John and Palsberg, Jens},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DARTS.8.2.3},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-162018},
  doi =		{10.4230/DARTS.8.2.3},
  annote =	{Keywords: formal semantics, concurrency, compilation}
}
Document
Compiling Volatile Correctly in Java

Authors: Shuyang Liu, John Bender, and Jens Palsberg

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 222, 36th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2022)


Abstract
The compilation scheme for Volatile accesses in the OpenJDK 9 HotSpot Java Virtual Machine has a major problem that persists despite a recent bug report and a long discussion. One of the suggested fixes is to let Java compile Volatile accesses in the same way as C/C++11. However, we show that this approach is invalid for Java. Indeed, we show a set of optimizations that is valid for C/C++11 but invalid for Java, while the compilation scheme is similar. We prove the correctness of the compilation scheme to Power and x86 and a suite of valid optimizations in Java. Our proofs are based on a language model that we validate by proving key properties such as the DRF-SC theorem and by running litmus tests via our implementation of Java in Herd7.

Cite as

Shuyang Liu, John Bender, and Jens Palsberg. Compiling Volatile Correctly in Java. In 36th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2022). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 222, pp. 6:1-6:26, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@InProceedings{liu_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2022.6,
  author =	{Liu, Shuyang and Bender, John and Palsberg, Jens},
  title =	{{Compiling Volatile Correctly in Java}},
  booktitle =	{36th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2022)},
  pages =	{6:1--6:26},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-225-9},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{222},
  editor =	{Ali, Karim and Vitek, Jan},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2022.6},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-162346},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2022.6},
  annote =	{Keywords: formal semantics, concurrency, compilation}
}
Document
Invited Talk
The Challenges of Weak Persistency (Invited Talk)

Authors: Viktor Vafeiadis

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 211, 9th Conference on Algebra and Coalgebra in Computer Science (CALCO 2021)


Abstract
Non-volatile memory (NVM) is a new hardware technology that provides durable storage at performance similar to that of plain volatile RAM. As such, there is a lot of interest in exploiting this technology to improve the performance of existing disk-bound applications and to find new applications for it. Nevertheless, developing correct programs that interact with non-volatile memory is by no means easy, since mainstream architectures provide rather weak persistency semantics and rather low-level and expensive mechanisms in order to avoid weak behaviors. This creates many opportunities for researchers in programming language semantics, logic, and verification to develop techniques to assist programmers writing NVM programs. This short paper and the associated talk outline the challenges caused by NVM and the research opportunities for PL researchers.

Cite as

Viktor Vafeiadis. The Challenges of Weak Persistency (Invited Talk). In 9th Conference on Algebra and Coalgebra in Computer Science (CALCO 2021). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 211, pp. 4:1-4:3, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2021)


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@InProceedings{vafeiadis:LIPIcs.CALCO.2021.4,
  author =	{Vafeiadis, Viktor},
  title =	{{The Challenges of Weak Persistency}},
  booktitle =	{9th Conference on Algebra and Coalgebra in Computer Science (CALCO 2021)},
  pages =	{4:1--4:3},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-212-9},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2021},
  volume =	{211},
  editor =	{Gadducci, Fabio and Silva, Alexandra},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.CALCO.2021.4},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-153593},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.CALCO.2021.4},
  annote =	{Keywords: Weak Persistency, Non-Volatile Memory}
}
Document
Artifact
Reconciling Event Structures with Modern Multiprocessors (Artifact)

Authors: Evgenii Moiseenko, Anton Podkopaev, Ori Lahav, Orestis Melkonian, and Viktor Vafeiadis

Published in: DARTS, Volume 6, Issue 2, Special Issue of the 34th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2020)


Abstract
The artifact is a virtual machine image containing two Coq packages which include mechanization of proofs stated in the paper. The first package imm contains a modified version of the Intermediate Memory Model, extended with the support of sequentially consistent atomics, and the compilation correctness proofs from it to hardware models. The second package weakestmoToImm contains a definition of the Weakestmo memory model as well as a compilation correctness proof from it to IMM.

Cite as

Evgenii Moiseenko, Anton Podkopaev, Ori Lahav, Orestis Melkonian, and Viktor Vafeiadis. Reconciling Event Structures with Modern Multiprocessors (Artifact). In Special Issue of the 34th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2020). Dagstuhl Artifacts Series (DARTS), Volume 6, Issue 2, pp. 4:1-4:3, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2020)


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@Article{moiseenko_et_al:DARTS.6.2.4,
  author =	{Moiseenko, Evgenii and Podkopaev, Anton and Lahav, Ori and Melkonian, Orestis and Vafeiadis, Viktor},
  title =	{{Reconciling Event Structures with Modern Multiprocessors (Artifact)}},
  pages =	{4:1--4:3},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Artifacts Series},
  ISSN =	{2509-8195},
  year =	{2020},
  volume =	{6},
  number =	{2},
  editor =	{Moiseenko, Evgenii and Podkopaev, Anton and Lahav, Ori and Melkonian, Orestis and Vafeiadis, Viktor},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DARTS.6.2.4},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-132015},
  doi =		{10.4230/DARTS.6.2.4},
  annote =	{Keywords: Weak Memory Consistency, Event Structures, IMM, Weakestmo}
}
Document
Reconciling Event Structures with Modern Multiprocessors

Authors: Evgenii Moiseenko, Anton Podkopaev, Ori Lahav, Orestis Melkonian, and Viktor Vafeiadis

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 166, 34th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2020)


Abstract
Weakestmo is a recently proposed memory consistency model that uses event structures to resolve the infamous "out-of-thin-air" problem and to enable efficient compilation to hardware. Nevertheless, this latter property - compilation correctness - has not yet been formally established. This paper closes this gap by establishing correctness of the intended compilation schemes from Weakestmo to a wide range of formal hardware memory models (x86, POWER, ARMv7, ARMv8) in the Coq proof assistant. Our proof is the first that establishes correctness of compilation of an event-structure-based model that forbids "out-of-thin-air" behaviors, as well as the first mechanized compilation proof of a weak memory model supporting sequentially consistent accesses to such a range of hardware platforms. Our compilation proof goes via the recent Intermediate Memory Model (IMM), which we suitably extend with sequentially consistent accesses.

Cite as

Evgenii Moiseenko, Anton Podkopaev, Ori Lahav, Orestis Melkonian, and Viktor Vafeiadis. Reconciling Event Structures with Modern Multiprocessors. In 34th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2020). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 166, pp. 5:1-5:26, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2020)


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@InProceedings{moiseenko_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2020.5,
  author =	{Moiseenko, Evgenii and Podkopaev, Anton and Lahav, Ori and Melkonian, Orestis and Vafeiadis, Viktor},
  title =	{{Reconciling Event Structures with Modern Multiprocessors}},
  booktitle =	{34th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2020)},
  pages =	{5:1--5:26},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-154-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2020},
  volume =	{166},
  editor =	{Hirschfeld, Robert and Pape, Tobias},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2020.5},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-131622},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2020.5},
  annote =	{Keywords: Weak Memory Consistency, Event Structures, IMM, Weakestmo}
}
Document
K-LLVM: A Relatively Complete Semantics of LLVM IR

Authors: Liyi Li and Elsa L. Gunter

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 166, 34th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2020)


Abstract
LLVM [Lattner and Adve, 2004] is designed for the compile-time, link-time and run-time optimization of programs written in various programming languages. The language supported by LLVM targeted by modern compilers is LLVM IR [llvm.org, 2018]. In this paper we define K-LLVM, a reference semantics for LLVM IR. To the best of our knowledge, K-LLVM is the most complete formal LLVM IR semantics to date, including all LLVM IR instructions, intrinsic functions in the LLVM documentation and Standard-C library functions that are necessary to execute many LLVM IR programs. Additionally, K-LLVM formulates an abstract machine that executes all LLVM IR instructions. The machine allows to describe our formal semantics in terms of simulating a conceptual virtual machine that runs LLVM IR programs, including non-deterministic programs. Even though the K-LLVM memory model in this paper is assumed to be a sequentially consistent memory model and does not include all LLVM concurrency memory behaviors, the design of K-LLVM’s data layout allows the K-LLVM abstract machine to execute some LLVM IR programs that previous semantics did not cover, such as the full range of LLVM IR behaviors for the interaction among LLVM IR casting, pointer arithmetic, memory operations and some memory flags (e.g. readonly) of function headers. Additionally, the memory model is modularized in a manner that supports investigating other memory models. To validate K-LLVM, we have implemented it in 𝕂 [Roşu, 2016], which generated an interpreter for LLVM IR. Using this, we ran tests including 1,385 unit test programs and around 3,000 concrete LLVM IR programs, and K-LLVM passed all of them.

Cite as

Liyi Li and Elsa L. Gunter. K-LLVM: A Relatively Complete Semantics of LLVM IR. In 34th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2020). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 166, pp. 7:1-7:29, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2020)


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@InProceedings{li_et_al:LIPIcs.ECOOP.2020.7,
  author =	{Li, Liyi and Gunter, Elsa L.},
  title =	{{K-LLVM: A Relatively Complete Semantics of LLVM IR}},
  booktitle =	{34th European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming (ECOOP 2020)},
  pages =	{7:1--7:29},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-154-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2020},
  volume =	{166},
  editor =	{Hirschfeld, Robert and Pape, Tobias},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2020.7},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-131649},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ECOOP.2020.7},
  annote =	{Keywords: LLVM, formal semantics, K framework, memory model, abstract machine}
}
Document
Coinduction in Flow: The Later Modality in Fibrations

Authors: Henning Basold

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 139, 8th Conference on Algebra and Coalgebra in Computer Science (CALCO 2019)


Abstract
This paper provides a construction on fibrations that gives access to the so-called later modality, which allows for a controlled form of recursion in coinductive proofs and programs. The construction is essentially a generalisation of the topos of trees from the codomain fibration over sets to arbitrary fibrations. As a result, we obtain a framework that allows the addition of a recursion principle for coinduction to rather arbitrary logics and programming languages. The main interest of using recursion is that it allows one to write proofs and programs in a goal-oriented fashion. This enables easily understandable coinductive proofs and programs, and fosters automatic proof search. Part of the framework are also various results that enable a wide range of applications: transportation of (co)limits, exponentials, fibred adjunctions and first-order connectives from the initial fibration to the one constructed through the framework. This means that the framework extends any first-order logic with the later modality. Moreover, we obtain soundness and completeness results, and can use up-to techniques as proof rules. Since the construction works for a wide variety of fibrations, we will be able to use the recursion offered by the later modality in various context. For instance, we will show how recursive proofs can be obtained for arbitrary (syntactic) first-order logics, for coinductive set-predicates, and for the probabilistic modal mu-calculus. Finally, we use the same construction to obtain a novel language for probabilistic productive coinductive programming. These examples demonstrate the flexibility of the framework and its accompanying results.

Cite as

Henning Basold. Coinduction in Flow: The Later Modality in Fibrations. In 8th Conference on Algebra and Coalgebra in Computer Science (CALCO 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 139, pp. 8:1-8:22, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{basold:LIPIcs.CALCO.2019.8,
  author =	{Basold, Henning},
  title =	{{Coinduction in Flow: The Later Modality in Fibrations}},
  booktitle =	{8th Conference on Algebra and Coalgebra in Computer Science (CALCO 2019)},
  pages =	{8:1--8:22},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-120-7},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{139},
  editor =	{Roggenbach, Markus and Sokolova, Ana},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.CALCO.2019.8},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-114369},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.CALCO.2019.8},
  annote =	{Keywords: Coinduction, Fibrations, Later Modality, Recursive Proofs, Up-to techniques, Probabilistic Logic, Probabilistic Programming}
}
Document
Invited Paper
Coinduction: Automata, Formal Proof, Companions (Invited Paper)

Authors: Damien Pous

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 139, 8th Conference on Algebra and Coalgebra in Computer Science (CALCO 2019)


Abstract
Coinduction is a mathematical tool that is used pervasively in computer science: to program and reason about infinite data-structures, to give semantics to concurrent systems, to obtain automata algorithms. We present some of these applications in automata theory and in formalised mathematics. Then we discuss recent developments on the abstract theory of coinduction and its enhancements.

Cite as

Damien Pous. Coinduction: Automata, Formal Proof, Companions (Invited Paper). In 8th Conference on Algebra and Coalgebra in Computer Science (CALCO 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 139, pp. 4:1-4:4, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{pous:LIPIcs.CALCO.2019.4,
  author =	{Pous, Damien},
  title =	{{Coinduction: Automata, Formal Proof, Companions}},
  booktitle =	{8th Conference on Algebra and Coalgebra in Computer Science (CALCO 2019)},
  pages =	{4:1--4:4},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-120-7},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{139},
  editor =	{Roggenbach, Markus and Sokolova, Ana},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.CALCO.2019.4},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-114323},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.CALCO.2019.4},
  annote =	{Keywords: Coinduction, Automata, Coalgebra, Formal proofs}
}
Document
Short Paper
Hammering Mizar by Learning Clause Guidance (Short Paper)

Authors: Jan Jakubův and Josef Urban

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 141, 10th International Conference on Interactive Theorem Proving (ITP 2019)


Abstract
We describe a very large improvement of existing hammer-style proof automation over large ITP libraries by combining learning and theorem proving. In particular, we have integrated state-of-the-art machine learners into the E automated theorem prover, and developed methods that allow learning and efficient internal guidance of E over the whole Mizar library. The resulting trained system improves the real-time performance of E on the Mizar library by 70% in a single-strategy setting.

Cite as

Jan Jakubův and Josef Urban. Hammering Mizar by Learning Clause Guidance (Short Paper). In 10th International Conference on Interactive Theorem Proving (ITP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 141, pp. 34:1-34:8, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{jakubuv_et_al:LIPIcs.ITP.2019.34,
  author =	{Jakub\r{u}v, Jan and Urban, Josef},
  title =	{{Hammering Mizar by Learning Clause Guidance}},
  booktitle =	{10th International Conference on Interactive Theorem Proving (ITP 2019)},
  pages =	{34:1--34:8},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-122-1},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{141},
  editor =	{Harrison, John and O'Leary, John and Tolmach, Andrew},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ITP.2019.34},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-110898},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ITP.2019.34},
  annote =	{Keywords: Proof automation, ITP hammers, Automated theorem proving, Machine learning}
}
Document
Verifying That a Compiler Preserves Concurrent Value-Dependent Information-Flow Security

Authors: Robert Sison and Toby Murray

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 141, 10th International Conference on Interactive Theorem Proving (ITP 2019)


Abstract
It is common to prove by reasoning over source code that programs do not leak sensitive data. But doing so leaves a gap between reasoning and reality that can only be filled by accounting for the behaviour of the compiler. This task is complicated when programs enforce value-dependent information-flow security properties (in which classification of locations can vary depending on values in other locations) and complicated further when programs exploit shared-variable concurrency. Prior work has formally defined a notion of concurrency-aware refinement for preserving value-dependent security properties. However, that notion is considerably more complex than standard refinement definitions typically applied in the verification of semantics preservation by compilers. To date it remains unclear whether it can be applied to a realistic compiler, because there exist no general decomposition principles for separating it into smaller, more familiar, proof obligations. In this work, we provide such a decomposition principle, which we show can almost halve the complexity of proving secure refinement. Further, we demonstrate its applicability to secure compilation, by proving in Isabelle/HOL the preservation of value-dependent security by a proof-of-concept compiler from an imperative While language to a generic RISC-style assembly language, for programs with shared-memory concurrency mediated by locking primitives. Finally, we execute our compiler in Isabelle on a While language model of the Cross Domain Desktop Compositor, demonstrating to our knowledge the first use of a compiler verification result to carry an information-flow security property down to the assembly-level model of a non-trivial concurrent program.

Cite as

Robert Sison and Toby Murray. Verifying That a Compiler Preserves Concurrent Value-Dependent Information-Flow Security. In 10th International Conference on Interactive Theorem Proving (ITP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 141, pp. 27:1-27:19, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{sison_et_al:LIPIcs.ITP.2019.27,
  author =	{Sison, Robert and Murray, Toby},
  title =	{{Verifying That a Compiler Preserves Concurrent Value-Dependent Information-Flow Security}},
  booktitle =	{10th International Conference on Interactive Theorem Proving (ITP 2019)},
  pages =	{27:1--27:19},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-122-1},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{141},
  editor =	{Harrison, John and O'Leary, John and Tolmach, Andrew},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ITP.2019.27},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-110829},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ITP.2019.27},
  annote =	{Keywords: Secure compilation, Information flow security, Concurrency, Verification}
}
Document
Primitive Floats in Coq

Authors: Guillaume Bertholon, Érik Martin-Dorel, and Pierre Roux

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 141, 10th International Conference on Interactive Theorem Proving (ITP 2019)


Abstract
Some mathematical proofs involve intensive computations, for instance: the four-color theorem, Hales' theorem on sphere packing (formerly known as the Kepler conjecture) or interval arithmetic. For numerical computations, floating-point arithmetic enjoys widespread usage thanks to its efficiency, despite the introduction of rounding errors. Formal guarantees can be obtained on floating-point algorithms based on the IEEE 754 standard, which precisely specifies floating-point arithmetic and its rounding modes, and a proof assistant such as Coq, that enjoys efficient computation capabilities. Coq offers machine integers, however floating-point arithmetic still needed to be emulated using these integers. A modified version of Coq is presented that enables using the machine floating-point operators. The main obstacles to such an implementation and its soundness are discussed. Benchmarks show potential performance gains of two orders of magnitude.

Cite as

Guillaume Bertholon, Érik Martin-Dorel, and Pierre Roux. Primitive Floats in Coq. In 10th International Conference on Interactive Theorem Proving (ITP 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 141, pp. 7:1-7:20, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{bertholon_et_al:LIPIcs.ITP.2019.7,
  author =	{Bertholon, Guillaume and Martin-Dorel, \'{E}rik and Roux, Pierre},
  title =	{{Primitive Floats in Coq}},
  booktitle =	{10th International Conference on Interactive Theorem Proving (ITP 2019)},
  pages =	{7:1--7:20},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-122-1},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{141},
  editor =	{Harrison, John and O'Leary, John and Tolmach, Andrew},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ITP.2019.7},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-110629},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ITP.2019.7},
  annote =	{Keywords: Coq formal proofs, floating-point arithmetic, reflexive tactics, Cholesky decomposition}
}
Document
Robustness Against Transactional Causal Consistency

Authors: Sidi Mohamed Beillahi, Ahmed Bouajjani, and Constantin Enea

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 140, 30th International Conference on Concurrency Theory (CONCUR 2019)


Abstract
Distributed storage systems and databases are widely used by various types of applications. Transactional access to these storage systems is an important abstraction allowing application programmers to consider blocks of actions (i.e., transactions) as executing atomically. For performance reasons, the consistency models implemented by modern databases are weaker than the standard serializability model, which corresponds to the atomicity abstraction of transactions executing over a sequentially consistent memory. Causal consistency for instance is one such model that is widely used in practice. In this paper, we investigate application-specific relationships between several variations of causal consistency and we address the issue of verifying automatically if a given transactional program is robust against causal consistency, i.e., all its behaviors when executed over an arbitrary causally consistent database are serializable. We show that programs without write-write races have the same set of behaviors under all these variations, and we show that checking robustness is polynomial time reducible to a state reachability problem in transactional programs over a sequentially consistent shared memory. A surprising corollary of the latter result is that causal consistency variations which admit incomparable sets of behaviors admit comparable sets of robust programs. This reduction also opens the door to leveraging existing methods and tools for the verification of concurrent programs (assuming sequential consistency) for reasoning about programs running over causally consistent databases. Furthermore, it allows to establish that the problem of checking robustness is decidable when the programs executed at different sites are finite-state.

Cite as

Sidi Mohamed Beillahi, Ahmed Bouajjani, and Constantin Enea. Robustness Against Transactional Causal Consistency. In 30th International Conference on Concurrency Theory (CONCUR 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 140, pp. 30:1-30:18, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{beillahi_et_al:LIPIcs.CONCUR.2019.30,
  author =	{Beillahi, Sidi Mohamed and Bouajjani, Ahmed and Enea, Constantin},
  title =	{{Robustness Against Transactional Causal Consistency}},
  booktitle =	{30th International Conference on Concurrency Theory (CONCUR 2019)},
  pages =	{30:1--30:18},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-121-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{140},
  editor =	{Fokkink, Wan and van Glabbeek, Rob},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.CONCUR.2019.30},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-109321},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.CONCUR.2019.30},
  annote =	{Keywords: Distributed Databases, Causal Consistency, Model Checking}
}
Document
Version Control Is for Your Data Too

Authors: Gowtham Kaki, KC Sivaramakrishnan, and Suresh Jagannathan

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 136, 3rd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2019)


Abstract
Programmers regularly use distributed version control systems (DVCS) such as Git to facilitate collaborative software development. The primary purpose of a DVCS is to maintain integrity of source code in the presence of concurrent, possibly conflicting edits from collaborators. In addition to safely merging concurrent non-conflicting edits, a DVCS extensively tracks source code provenance to help programmers contextualize and resolve conflicts. Provenance also facilitates debugging by letting programmers see diffs between versions and quickly find those edits that introduced the offending conflict (e.g., via git blame). In this paper, we posit that analogous workflows to collaborative software development also arise in distributed software execution; we argue that the characteristics that make a DVCS an ideal fit for the former also make it an ideal fit for the latter. Building on this observation, we propose a distributed programming model, called carmot that views distributed shared state as an entity evolving in time, manifested as a sequence of persistent versions, and relies on an explicitly defined merge semantics to reconcile concurrent conflicting versions. We show examples demonstrating how carmot simplifies distributed programming, while also enabling novel workflows integral to modern applications such as blockchains. We also describe a prototype implementation of carmot that we use to evaluate its practicality.

Cite as

Gowtham Kaki, KC Sivaramakrishnan, and Suresh Jagannathan. Version Control Is for Your Data Too. In 3rd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 136, pp. 8:1-8:18, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{kaki_et_al:LIPIcs.SNAPL.2019.8,
  author =	{Kaki, Gowtham and Sivaramakrishnan, KC and Jagannathan, Suresh},
  title =	{{Version Control Is for Your Data Too}},
  booktitle =	{3rd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2019)},
  pages =	{8:1--8:18},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-113-9},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{136},
  editor =	{Lerner, Benjamin S. and Bod{\'\i}k, Rastislav and Krishnamurthi, Shriram},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2019.8},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-105516},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2019.8},
  annote =	{Keywords: replication, distributed systems, version control}
}
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