Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 10



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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 10, November 2021, Complete Issue

Abstract
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 10, November 2021, Complete Issue

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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 10, pp. 1-206, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@Article{DagRep.11.10,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 10, November 2021, Complete Issue}},
  pages =	{1--206},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{11},
  number =	{10},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.11.10},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-159231},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.11.10},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 10, November 2021, Complete Issue}
}
Document
Front Matter
Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 11, Issue 10, 2021

Abstract
Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 11, Issue 10, 2021

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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 10, pp. i-ii, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@Article{DagRep.11.10.i,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 11, Issue 10, 2021}},
  pages =	{i--ii},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{11},
  number =	{10},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.11.10.i},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-159248},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.11.10.i},
  annote =	{Keywords: Table of Contents, Frontmatter}
}
Document
Adaptive Resource Management for HPC Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 21441)

Authors: Michael Gerndt, Masaaki Kondo, Barton P. Miller, and Tapasya Patki


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 21441 "Adaptive Resource Management for HPC Systems". The seminar investigated the impact of adaptive resource management of malleable applications on the management of the HPC system, the programming of the applications, the tools for performance analysis and tuning, as well as the efficient usage of the HPC systems. The discussions led to a joint summary presenting the state-of-the-art, required techniques on the various levels of HPC systems, as well as the foreseen advantages of adaptive resource management.

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Michael Gerndt, Masaaki Kondo, Barton P. Miller, and Tapasya Patki. Adaptive Resource Management for HPC Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 21441). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 10, pp. 1-19, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@Article{gerndt_et_al:DagRep.11.10.1,
  author =	{Gerndt, Michael and Kondo, Masaaki and Miller, Barton P. and Patki, Tapasya},
  title =	{{Adaptive Resource Management for HPC Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 21441)}},
  pages =	{1--19},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{11},
  number =	{10},
  editor =	{Gerndt, Michael and Kondo, Masaaki and Miller, Barton P. and Patki, Tapasya},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.11.10.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-159256},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.11.10.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: High Performance Computing, dynamic resource management, malleable HPC applications, power management, computing continuum}
}
Document
Ensuring the Reliability and Robustness of Database Management Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 21442)

Authors: Alexander Böhm, Maria Christakis, Eric Lo, and Manuel Rigger


Abstract
The goal of this seminar was to bring together researchers and practitioners from various domains such as of databases, automatic testing, and formal methods to build a common ground and to explore possibilities for systematically improving the state of the art in database management system engineering. The outcome of the seminar was a joint understanding of the specific intricacies of building stateful system software, as well as the identification of several areas of future work. In particular, we believe that database system engineering can both be significantly improved by adopting additional verification techniques and testing tools, and can provide important feedback and additional challenges (e.g. related to state management) to neighboring domains.

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Alexander Böhm, Maria Christakis, Eric Lo, and Manuel Rigger. Ensuring the Reliability and Robustness of Database Management Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 21442). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 10, pp. 20-35, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@Article{bohm_et_al:DagRep.11.10.20,
  author =	{B\"{o}hm, Alexander and Christakis, Maria and Lo, Eric and Rigger, Manuel},
  title =	{{Ensuring the Reliability and Robustness of Database Management Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 21442)}},
  pages =	{20--35},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{11},
  number =	{10},
  editor =	{B\"{o}hm, Alexander and Christakis, Maria and Lo, Eric and Rigger, Manuel},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.11.10.20},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-159269},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.11.10.20},
  annote =	{Keywords: Databases, Reliability, Robustness, Testing, Dagstuhl Seminar}
}
Document
Managing Industrial Control Systems Security Risks for Cyber Insurance (Dagstuhl Seminar 21451)

Authors: Simon Dejung, Mingyan Liu, Arndt Lüder, and Edgar Weippl


Abstract
Industrial control systems (ICSs), such as production systems or critical infrastructures, are an attractive target for cybercriminals, since attacks against these systems may cause severe physical damages/material damages (PD/MD), resulting in business interruption (BI) and loss of profit (LOP). Besides financial loss, cyber-attacks against ICSs can also harm human health or the environment or even be used as a kind of weapon. Thus, it is of utmost importance to manage cyber risks throughout the ICS’s lifecycle (i.e., engineering, operation, decommissioning), especially in light of the ever-increasing threat level that is accompanied by the progressive digitization of industrial processes. However, asset owners may not be able to address security risks sufficiently, nor adequately quantify them in terms of their potential impact (physical and non-physical) and likelihood. A self-deceptive solution might be using insurance to transfer these risks and offload them from their balance sheet since the underlying problem remains unsolved. The reason for this is that the exposure for asset owners remains and mitigation measures may still not be implemented adequately while the insurance industry is onboarding unassessed risks and covering it often without premium and without managing the potential exposure of accumulated events. The Dagstuhl Seminar 21451 "Managing Industrial Control Systems Security Risks for Cyber Insurance" aimed to provide an interdisciplinary forum to analyze and discuss open questions and current topics of research in this area in order to gain in-depth insights into the security risks of ICSs and the quantification thereof.

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Simon Dejung, Mingyan Liu, Arndt Lüder, and Edgar Weippl. Managing Industrial Control Systems Security Risks for Cyber Insurance (Dagstuhl Seminar 21451). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 10, pp. 36-56, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@Article{dejung_et_al:DagRep.11.10.36,
  author =	{Dejung, Simon and Liu, Mingyan and L\"{u}der, Arndt and Weippl, Edgar},
  title =	{{Managing Industrial Control Systems Security Risks for Cyber Insurance (Dagstuhl Seminar 21451)}},
  pages =	{36--56},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{11},
  number =	{10},
  editor =	{Dejung, Simon and Liu, Mingyan and L\"{u}der, Arndt and Weippl, Edgar},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.11.10.36},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-159273},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.11.10.36},
  annote =	{Keywords: industrial control systems, security, cyber insurance, cyber risk quantification, production systems engineering, risk engineering, SCADA, Industry 4.0}
}
Document
Unambiguity in Automata Theory (Dagstuhl Seminar 21452)

Authors: Thomas Colcombet, Karin Quaas, and Michał Skrzypczak


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 21452 "Unambiguity in Automata Theory". The aim of the seminar was to improve the understanding of the notion of unambiguity in automata theory, especially with respect to questions related to the expressive power, succinctness, and the tractability of unambiguous devices. The main motivation behind these studies is the hope that unambiguous machines can provide a golden balance between efficiency - sometimes not worse than for deterministic devices - and expressibility / succinctness, which often is similar to the general nondeterministic machines. These trade-offs become especially important in the models where the expressiveness or the decidability status of unambiguous machines is different from that of nondeterministic ones, as it is the case, e.g., for register automata.

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Thomas Colcombet, Karin Quaas, and Michał Skrzypczak. Unambiguity in Automata Theory (Dagstuhl Seminar 21452). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 10, pp. 57-71, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@Article{colcombet_et_al:DagRep.11.10.57,
  author =	{Colcombet, Thomas and Quaas, Karin and Skrzypczak, Micha{\l}},
  title =	{{Unambiguity in Automata Theory (Dagstuhl Seminar 21452)}},
  pages =	{57--71},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{11},
  number =	{10},
  editor =	{Colcombet, Thomas and Quaas, Karin and Skrzypczak, Micha{\l}},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.11.10.57},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-159282},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.11.10.57},
  annote =	{Keywords: Unambiguity in Automata Theory, Dagstuhl Seminar}
}
Document
Descriptive Set Theory and Computable Topology (Dagstuhl Seminar 21461)

Authors: Mathieu Hoyrup, Arno Pauly, Victor Selivanov, and Mariya I. Soskova


Abstract
Computability and continuity are closely linked - in fact, continuity can be seen as computability relative to an arbitrary oracle. As such, concepts from topology and descriptive set theory feature heavily in the foundations of computable analysis. Conversely, techniques developed in computability theory can be fruitfully employed in topology and descriptive set theory, even if the desired results mention no computability at all. In this Dagstuhl Seminar, we brought together researchers from computable analysis, from classical computability theory, from descriptive set theory, formal topology, and other relevant areas. Our goals were to identify key open questions related to this interplay, to exploit synergies between the areas and to intensify collaboration between the relevant communities.

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Mathieu Hoyrup, Arno Pauly, Victor Selivanov, and Mariya I. Soskova. Descriptive Set Theory and Computable Topology (Dagstuhl Seminar 21461). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 10, pp. 72-93, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@Article{hoyrup_et_al:DagRep.11.10.72,
  author =	{Hoyrup, Mathieu and Pauly, Arno and Selivanov, Victor and Soskova, Mariya I.},
  title =	{{Descriptive Set Theory and Computable Topology (Dagstuhl Seminar 21461)}},
  pages =	{72--93},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{11},
  number =	{10},
  editor =	{Hoyrup, Mathieu and Pauly, Arno and Selivanov, Victor and Soskova, Mariya I.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.11.10.72},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-159293},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.11.10.72},
  annote =	{Keywords: computable analysis, enumeration degrees, quasi-polish spaces, synthetic topology}
}
Document
Foundations of Persistent Programming (Dagstuhl Seminar 21462)

Authors: Hans-J. Boehm, Ori Lahav, and Azalea Raad


Abstract
Although early electronic computers commonly had persistent core memory that retained its contents with power off, modern computers generally do not. DRAM loses its contents when power is lost. However, DRAM has been difficult to scale to smaller feature sizes and larger capacities, making it costly to build balanced systems with sufficient amounts of directly accessible memory. Commonly proposed replacements, including Intel’s Optane product, are once again persistent. It is however unclear, and probably unlikely, that the fastest levels of the memory hierarchy will be able to adopt such technology. No such non-volatile (NVM) technology has yet taken over, but there remains a strong economic incentive to move hardware in this direction, and it would be disappointing if we continued to be constrained by the current DRAM scaling. Since current computer systems often invest great effort, in the form of software complexity, power, and computation time, to "persist" data from DRAM by rearranging and copying it to persistent storage, like magnetic disks or flash memory, it is natural and important to ask whether we can leverage persistence of part of primary memory to avoid this overhead. Such efforts are complicated by the fact that real systems are likely to remain only partially persistent; some memory components, like processor caches and device registers. may remain volatile. This seminar focused on various aspects of programming for such persistent memory systems, ranging from programming models for reasoning about and formally verifying programs that leverage persistence, to techniques for converting existing multithreaded programs (particularly, lock-free ones) to corresponding programs that also directly persist their state in NVM. We explored relationships between this problem and prior work on concurrent programming models.

Cite as

Hans-J. Boehm, Ori Lahav, and Azalea Raad. Foundations of Persistent Programming (Dagstuhl Seminar 21462). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 10, pp. 94-110, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@Article{boehm_et_al:DagRep.11.10.94,
  author =	{Boehm, Hans-J. and Lahav, Ori and Raad, Azalea},
  title =	{{Foundations of Persistent Programming (Dagstuhl Seminar 21462)}},
  pages =	{94--110},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{11},
  number =	{10},
  editor =	{Boehm, Hans-J. and Lahav, Ori and Raad, Azalea},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.11.10.94},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-159303},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.11.10.94},
  annote =	{Keywords: concurrency; non-volatile-memory; persistency; semantics; weak memory models}
}
Document
Geometric Modeling: Interoperability and New Challenges (Dagstuhl Seminar 21471)

Authors: Falai Chen, Tor Dokken, and Géraldine Morin


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 21471 "Geometric Modeling: Interoperability and New Challenges". This seminar was initially planned on May 2021, and was delayed due to the pandemic. The seminar took place as a hybrid version with on site and remote participants. It provided a great opportunity for exchanges which, as pointed out by participants, were very appreciated in this period where international scientific interactions have been diminished. This report summarizes the seminar communications, first by providing the abstracts of the talks which present recent results in geometric modeling. Moreover, the scientific exchanges during the seminar provided a great basis for scientific discussions that resulted to the included five reports which highlight the new and future challenges in Geometric Modeling.

Cite as

Falai Chen, Tor Dokken, and Géraldine Morin. Geometric Modeling: Interoperability and New Challenges (Dagstuhl Seminar 21471). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 10, pp. 111-150, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@Article{chen_et_al:DagRep.11.10.111,
  author =	{Chen, Falai and Dokken, Tor and Morin, G\'{e}raldine},
  title =	{{Geometric Modeling: Interoperability and New Challenges (Dagstuhl Seminar 21471)}},
  pages =	{111--150},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{11},
  number =	{10},
  editor =	{Chen, Falai and Dokken, Tor and Morin, G\'{e}raldine},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.11.10.111},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-159319},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.11.10.111},
  annote =	{Keywords: Additive Manufacturing; Computer Graphics; Design Optimization; Geometric Modeling; Geometry; Geometry Processing; Isogeometric Analysis; Shape Design; Computer-Aided Design}
}
Document
Geometric Logic, Constructivisation, and Automated Theorem Proving (Dagstuhl Seminar 21472)

Authors: Thierry Coquand, Hajime Ishihara, Sara Negri, and Peter M. Schuster


Abstract
At least from a practical and contemporary angle, the time-honoured question about the extent of intuitionistic mathematics rather is to which extent any given proof is effective, which proofs of which theorems can be rendered effective, and whether and how numerical information such as bounds and algorithms can be extracted from proofs. All this is ideally done by manipulating proofs mechanically or by adequate metatheorems, which includes proof translations, automated theorem proving, program extraction from proofs, proof analysis and proof mining. The question should thus be put as: What is the computational content of proofs? Guided by this central question, the present Dagstuhl seminar puts a special focus on coherent and geometric theories and their generalisations. These are not only widespread in mathematics and non-classical logics such as temporal and modal logics, but also a priori amenable for constructivisation, e.g., by Barr’s Theorem, and last but not least particularly suited as a basis for automated theorem proving. Specific topics include categorical semantics for geometric theories, complexity issues of and algorithms for geometrisation of theories including speed-up questions, the use of geometric theories in constructive mathematics including finding algorithms, proof-theoretic presentation of sheaf models and higher toposes, and coherent logic for automatically readable proofs.

Cite as

Thierry Coquand, Hajime Ishihara, Sara Negri, and Peter M. Schuster. Geometric Logic, Constructivisation, and Automated Theorem Proving (Dagstuhl Seminar 21472). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 10, pp. 151-172, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@Article{coquand_et_al:DagRep.11.10.151,
  author =	{Coquand, Thierry and Ishihara, Hajime and Negri, Sara and Schuster, Peter M.},
  title =	{{Geometric Logic, Constructivisation, and Automated Theorem Proving (Dagstuhl Seminar 21472)}},
  pages =	{151--172},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{11},
  number =	{10},
  editor =	{Coquand, Thierry and Ishihara, Hajime and Negri, Sara and Schuster, Peter M.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.11.10.151},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-159321},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.11.10.151},
  annote =	{Keywords: automated theorem proving, categorical semantics, constructivisation, geometric logic, proof theory}
}
Document
Secure Compilation (Dagstuhl Seminar 21481)

Authors: David Chisnall, Deepak Garg, Catalin Hritcu, and Mathias Payer


Abstract
Secure compilation is an emerging field that puts together advances in security, programming languages, compilers, verification, systems, and hardware architectures in order to devise more secure compilation chains that eliminate many of today’s security vulnerabilities and that allow sound reasoning about security properties in the source language. For a concrete example, all modern languages provide a notion of structured control flow and an invoked procedure is expected to return to the right place. However, today’s compilation chains (compilers, linkers, loaders, runtime systems, hardware) cannot efficiently enforce this abstraction against linked low-level code, which can call and return to arbitrary instructions or smash the stack, blatantly violating the high-level abstraction. Other problems arise because today’s languages fail to specify security policies, such as data confidentiality, and the compilation chains thus fail to enforce them, especially against powerful side-channel attacks. The emerging secure compilation community aims to address such problems by identifying precise security goals and attacker models, designing more secure languages, devising efficient enforcement and mitigation mechanisms, and developing effective verification techniques for secure compilation chains. This seminar strived to take a broad and inclusive view of secure compilation and to provide a forum for discussion on the topic. The goal was to identify interesting research directions and open challenges by bringing together people working on building secure compilation chains, on designing security enforcement and attack-mitigation mechanisms in both software and hardware, and on developing formal verification techniques for secure compilation.

Cite as

David Chisnall, Deepak Garg, Catalin Hritcu, and Mathias Payer. Secure Compilation (Dagstuhl Seminar 21481). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 11, Issue 10, pp. 173-204, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@Article{chisnall_et_al:DagRep.11.10.173,
  author =	{Chisnall, David and Garg, Deepak and Hritcu, Catalin and Payer, Mathias},
  title =	{{Secure Compilation (Dagstuhl Seminar 21481)}},
  pages =	{173--204},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{11},
  number =	{10},
  editor =	{Chisnall, David and Garg, Deepak and Hritcu, Catalin and Payer, Mathias},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.11.10.173},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-159332},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.11.10.173},
  annote =	{Keywords: secure compilation, low-level attacks, source-level reasoning, attacker models, full abstraction, hyperproperties, enforcement mechanisms, compartmentalization, security architectures, side-channels}
}

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