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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 9



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Complete Issue
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 9, September 2014, Complete Issue

Abstract
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 9, September 2014, Complete Issue

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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 9, September 2014, Complete Issue. In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 9, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2015)


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@Article{DagRep.4.9,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 9, September 2014, Complete Issue}},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2015},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.9},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-48984},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.9},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 9, September 2014, Complete Issue}
}
Document
Front Matter
Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 4, Issue 9, 2014

Abstract
Table of Contents, Frontmatter

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Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 4, Issue 9, 2014. In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 9, pp. i-ii, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2015)


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@Article{DagRep.4.9.i,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 4, Issue 9, 2014}},
  pages =	{i--ii},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2015},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.9.i},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-48977},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.9.i},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 4, Issue 9, 2014}
}
Document
Adjoint Methods in Computational Science, Engineering, and Finance (Dagstuhl Seminar 14371)

Authors: Nicolas R. Gauger, Michael Giles, Max Gunzburger, and Uwe Naumann


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 14371 "Adjoint Methods in Computational Science, Engineering, and Finance". The development of adjoint numerical methods yields a large number of theoretical, algorithmic, and practical (implementation) challenges most of them to be addressed by state of the art Computer Science and Applied Mathematics methodology including parallel high-performance computing, domain-specific program analysis and compiler construction, combinatorial scientific computing, numerical linear algebra / analysis, and functional analysis. One aim of this seminar was to tackle these challenges by setting the stage for accelerated development and deployment of such methods based on in-depth discussions between computer scientists, mathematicians, and practitioners from various (potential) application areas. The number of relevant issues is vast, thus asking for a series of meetings of this type to be initiated by this seminar. It focused on fundamental theoretical issues arising in the context of "continuous vs. discrete adjoints." The relevant context was provided by presentations of various (potential) applications of adjoint methods in CSEF.

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Nicolas R. Gauger, Michael Giles, Max Gunzburger, and Uwe Naumann. Adjoint Methods in Computational Science, Engineering, and Finance (Dagstuhl Seminar 14371). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 9, pp. 1-29, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2015)


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@Article{gauger_et_al:DagRep.4.9.1,
  author =	{Gauger, Nicolas R. and Giles, Michael and Gunzburger, Max and Naumann, Uwe},
  title =	{{Adjoint Methods in Computational Science, Engineering, and Finance (Dagstuhl Seminar 14371)}},
  pages =	{1--29},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2015},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{Gauger, Nicolas R. and Giles, Michael and Gunzburger, Max and Naumann, Uwe},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.9.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-48817},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.9.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: continuous adjoints, discrete adjoints, high-performance scientific computing,algorithmic differentiation}
}
Document
Analysis of Algorithms Beyond the Worst Case (Dagstuhl Seminar 14372)

Authors: Marina-Florina Balcan, Bodo Manthey, Heiko Röglin, and Tim Roughgarden


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 14372 "Analysis of Algorithms Beyond the Worst Case". The theory of algorithms has traditionally focused on worst-case analysis. This focus has led to both a deep theory and many beautiful and useful algorithms. However, there are a number of important problems and algorithms for which worst-case analysis does not provide useful or empirically accurate results. This is due to the fact that worst-case inputs are often rather contrived and occur hardly ever in practical applications. Only in recent years a paradigm shift towards a more realistic and robust algorithmic theory has been initiated. The development of a more realistic theory hinges on finding models that measure the performance of an algorithm not only by its worst-case behavior but rather by its behavior on "typical" inputs. In this seminar, we discussed various recent theoretical models and results that go beyond worst-case analysis. The seminar helped to consolidate the research and to foster collaborations among the researchers working in the different branches of analysis of algorithms beyond the worst case.

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Marina-Florina Balcan, Bodo Manthey, Heiko Röglin, and Tim Roughgarden. Analysis of Algorithms Beyond the Worst Case (Dagstuhl Seminar 14372). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 9, pp. 30-49, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2015)


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@Article{balcan_et_al:DagRep.4.9.30,
  author =	{Balcan, Marina-Florina and Manthey, Bodo and R\"{o}glin, Heiko and Roughgarden, Tim},
  title =	{{Analysis of Algorithms Beyond the Worst Case (Dagstuhl Seminar 14372)}},
  pages =	{30--49},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2015},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{Balcan, Marina-Florina and Manthey, Bodo and R\"{o}glin, Heiko and Roughgarden, Tim},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.9.30},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-48829},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.9.30},
  annote =	{Keywords: analysis of algorithms, probabilistic analysis, smoothed analysis, approximation stability, machine learning}
}
Document
Neural-Symbolic Learning and Reasoning (Dagstuhl Seminar 14381)

Authors: Artur d'Avila Garcez, Marco Gori, Pascal Hitzler, and Luís C. Lamb


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 14381 "Neural-Symbolic Learning and Reasoning", which was held from September 14th to 19th, 2014. This seminar brought together specialist in machine learning, knowledge representation and reasoning, computer vision and image understanding, natural language processing, and cognitive science. The aim of the seminar was to explore the interface among several fields that contribute to the effective integration of cognitive abilities such as learning, reasoning, vision and language understanding in intelligent and cognitive computational systems. The seminar consisted of contributed and invited talks, breakout and joint group discussion sessions.

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Artur d'Avila Garcez, Marco Gori, Pascal Hitzler, and Luís C. Lamb. Neural-Symbolic Learning and Reasoning (Dagstuhl Seminar 14381). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 9, pp. 50-84, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2015)


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@Article{davilagarcez_et_al:DagRep.4.9.50,
  author =	{d'Avila Garcez, Artur and Gori, Marco and Hitzler, Pascal and Lamb, Lu{\'\i}s C.},
  title =	{{Neural-Symbolic Learning and Reasoning (Dagstuhl Seminar 14381)}},
  pages =	{50--84},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2015},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{d'Avila Garcez, Artur and Gori, Marco and Hitzler, Pascal and Lamb, Lu{\'\i}s C.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.9.50},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-48843},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.9.50},
  annote =	{Keywords: Neural-symbolic computation, deep learning, image understanding, lifelong machine learning, natural language understanding, ontology learning}
}
Document
Algebra in Computational Complexity (Dagstuhl Seminar 14391)

Authors: Manindra Agrawal, Valentine Kabanets, Thomas Thierauf, and Christopher Umans


Abstract
At its core, much of Computational Complexity is concerned with combinatorial objects and structures. But it has often proven true that the best way to prove things about these combinatorial objects is by establishing a connection to a more well-behaved algebraic setting. Indeed, many of the deepest and most powerful results in Computational Complexity rely on algebraic proof techniques. The Razborov-Smolensky polynomial-approximation method for proving constant-depth circuit lower bounds, the PCP characterization of NP, and the Agrawal-Kayal-Saxena polynomial-time primality test are some of the most prominent examples. The algebraic theme continues in some of the most exciting recent progress in computational complexity. There have been significant recent advances in algebraic circuit lower bounds, and the so-called "chasm at depth 4" suggests that the restricted models now being considered are not so far from ones that would lead to a general result. There have been similar successes concerning the related problems of polynomial identity testing and circuit reconstruction in the algebraic model, and these are tied to central questions regarding the power of randomness in computation. Representation theory has emerged as an important tool in three separate lines of work: the "Geometric Complexity Theory" approach to P vs. NP and circuit lower bounds, the effort to resolve the complexity of matrix multiplication, and a framework for constructing locally testable codes. Coding theory has seen several algebraic innovations in recent years, including multiplicity codes, and new lower bounds. This seminar brought together researchers who are using a diverse array of algebraic methods in a variety of settings. It plays an important role in educating a diverse community about the latest new techniques, spurring further progress.

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Manindra Agrawal, Valentine Kabanets, Thomas Thierauf, and Christopher Umans. Algebra in Computational Complexity (Dagstuhl Seminar 14391). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 9, pp. 85-105, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2015)


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@Article{agrawal_et_al:DagRep.4.9.85,
  author =	{Agrawal, Manindra and Kabanets, Valentine and Thierauf, Thomas and Umans, Christopher},
  title =	{{Algebra in Computational Complexity (Dagstuhl Seminar 14391)}},
  pages =	{85--105},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2015},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{Agrawal, Manindra and Kabanets, Valentine and Thierauf, Thomas and Umans, Christopher},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.9.85},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-48851},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.9.85},
  annote =	{Keywords: Computational Complexity, lower bounds, approximazation, pseudo-randomness, derandomization, circuits}
}
Document
Privacy and Security in an Age of Surveillance (Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop 14401)

Authors: Bart Preneel, Phillip Rogaway, Mark D. Ryan, and Peter Y. A. Ryan


Abstract
The Snowden revelations have demonstrated that the US and other nations are amassing data about people's lives at an unprecedented scale. Furthermore, these revelations have shown that intelligence agencies are not only pursuing passive surveillance over the world's communication systems, but are also seeking to facilitate such surveillance by undermining the security of the internet and communications technologies. Thus the activities of these agencies threatens not only the rights of individual citizens but also the fabric of democratic society. Intelligence services do have a useful role to play in protecting society and for this need the capabilities and authority to perform targeted surveillance. But the scope of such surveillance must be strictly limited by an understanding of its costs as well as benefits, and it should not impinge on the privacy rights of citizens any more than necessary. Here we report on a recent Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop addressing these issues - a four-day gathering of experts from multiple disciplines connected with privacy and security. The meeting explored the scope of mass-surveillance and the deliberate undermining of the security of the internet, defined basic principles that should underlie needed reforms, and discussed the potential for technical, legal and regulatory means to help restore the security of the internet and stem infringement of human-rights by ubiquitous electronic surveillance.

Cite as

Bart Preneel, Phillip Rogaway, Mark D. Ryan, and Peter Y. A. Ryan. Privacy and Security in an Age of Surveillance (Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop 14401). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 9, pp. 106-123, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2015)


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@Article{preneel_et_al:DagRep.4.9.106,
  author =	{Preneel, Bart and Rogaway, Phillip and Ryan, Mark D. and Ryan, Peter Y. A.},
  title =	{{Privacy and Security in an Age of Surveillance (Dagstuhl Perspectives Workshop 14401)}},
  pages =	{106--123},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2015},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{Preneel, Bart and Rogaway, Phillip and Ryan, Mark D. and Ryan, Peter Y. A.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.9.106},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-48882},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.9.106},
  annote =	{Keywords: Big data, encryption, mass surveillance, privacy}
}
Document
Resilience in Exascale Computing (Dagstuhl Seminar 14402)

Authors: Hermann Härtig, Satoshi Matsuoka, Frank Mueller, and Alexander Reinefeld


Abstract
From September 28 to October 1, 2014, the Dagstuhl Seminar 14402 "Resilience in Exascale Computing" was held in Schloss Dagstuhl-Leibniz Center for Informatics. During the seminar, several participants presented their current research, and ongoing work and open problems were discussed. Abstracts of the presentations given during the seminar as well as abstracts of seminar results and ideas are put together in this paper. The first section describes the seminar topics and goals in general. Links to extended abstracts or full papers are provided, if available. Slides of the talks and abstracts are available online.

Cite as

Hermann Härtig, Satoshi Matsuoka, Frank Mueller, and Alexander Reinefeld. Resilience in Exascale Computing (Dagstuhl Seminar 14402). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 4, Issue 9, pp. 124-139, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2015)


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@Article{hartig_et_al:DagRep.4.9.124,
  author =	{H\"{a}rtig, Hermann and Matsuoka, Satoshi and Mueller, Frank and Reinefeld, Alexander},
  title =	{{Resilience in Exascale Computing (Dagstuhl Seminar 14402)}},
  pages =	{124--139},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2015},
  volume =	{4},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{H\"{a}rtig, Hermann and Matsuoka, Satoshi and Mueller, Frank and Reinefeld, Alexander},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.4.9.124},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-48898},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.4.9.124},
  annote =	{Keywords: Exascale computing, resilience, fault tolerance, manycore computers, operating systems, micro kernels, work-load balancing, checkpointing}
}

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