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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 11



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Complete Issue
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 11, November 2017, Complete Issue

Abstract
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 11, November 2017, Complete Issue

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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 11, November 2017, Complete Issue. In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 11, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{DagRep.7.11,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 11, November 2017, Complete Issue}},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.11},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-97316},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.11},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 11, November 2017, Complete Issue}
}
Document
Front Matter
Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 7, Issue 11, 2017

Abstract
Table of Contents, Frontmatter

Cite as

Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 7, Issue 11, 2017. In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 11, pp. i-ii, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{DagRep.7.11.i,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 7, Issue 11, 2017}},
  pages =	{i--ii},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.11.i},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-97308},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.11.i},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 7, Issue 11, 2017}
}
Document
New Challenges in Parallelism (Dagstuhl Seminar 17451)

Authors: Annette Bieniusa, Hans-J. Boehm, Maurice Herlihy, and Erez Petrank


Abstract
A continuing goal of current multiprocessor software design is to improve the performance and reliability of parallel algorithms. Parallel programming has traditionally been attacked from widely different angles by different groups of people: Hardware designers designing instruction sets, programming language designers designing languages and library interfaces, and theoreticians developing models of parallel computation. Unsurprisingly, this has not always led to consistent results. Newly developing areas show every sign of leading to similar divergence. This Dagstuhl Seminar will bring together researchers and practitioners from all three areas to discuss and reconcile thoughts on these challenges.

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Annette Bieniusa, Hans-J. Boehm, Maurice Herlihy, and Erez Petrank. New Challenges in Parallelism (Dagstuhl Seminar 17451). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 11, pp. 1-27, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{bieniusa_et_al:DagRep.7.11.1,
  author =	{Bieniusa, Annette and Boehm, Hans-J. and Herlihy, Maurice and Petrank, Erez},
  title =	{{New Challenges in Parallelism (Dagstuhl Seminar 17451)}},
  pages =	{1--27},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Bieniusa, Annette and Boehm, Hans-J. and Herlihy, Maurice and Petrank, Erez},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.11.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-86681},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.11.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: concurrency, memory models, non-volatile memory}
}
Document
Algorithmic Cheminformatics (Dagstuhl Seminar 17452)

Authors: Jakob L. Andersen, Christoph Flamm, Daniel Merkle, and Peter F. Stadler


Abstract
Dagstuhl Seminar 17452 "Algorithmic Cheminformatics" brought together leading researchers from both chemistry and computer science. The seminar was the second in a series of the Dagstuhl seminars and had a focus on concurrency theory as chemical systems are highly concurrent by nature. Within computer science we focused on formal approaches for chemistry and concurrency theory, including process calculi and Petri nets. The participants surveyed areas of overlapping interests and identified possible fields of joint future research.

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Jakob L. Andersen, Christoph Flamm, Daniel Merkle, and Peter F. Stadler. Algorithmic Cheminformatics (Dagstuhl Seminar 17452). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 11, pp. 28-45, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{andersen_et_al:DagRep.7.11.28,
  author =	{Andersen, Jakob L. and Flamm, Christoph and Merkle, Daniel and Stadler, Peter F.},
  title =	{{Algorithmic Cheminformatics (Dagstuhl Seminar 17452)}},
  pages =	{28--45},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Andersen, Jakob L. and Flamm, Christoph and Merkle, Daniel and Stadler, Peter F.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.11.28},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-86692},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.11.28},
  annote =	{Keywords: Modelling, Simulation, Networks, Semantics / Formal Methods}
}
Document
Connecting Visualization and Data Management Research (Dagstuhl Seminar 17461)

Authors: Remco Chang, Jean-Daniel Fekete, Juliana Freire, and Carlos E. Scheidegger


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 17461 "Connecting Visualization and Data Management Research".

Cite as

Remco Chang, Jean-Daniel Fekete, Juliana Freire, and Carlos E. Scheidegger. Connecting Visualization and Data Management Research (Dagstuhl Seminar 17461). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 11, pp. 46-58, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{chang_et_al:DagRep.7.11.46,
  author =	{Chang, Remco and Fekete, Jean-Daniel and Freire, Juliana and Scheidegger, Carlos E.},
  title =	{{Connecting Visualization and Data Management Research (Dagstuhl Seminar 17461)}},
  pages =	{46--58},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Chang, Remco and Fekete, Jean-Daniel and Freire, Juliana and Scheidegger, Carlos E.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.11.46},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-86708},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.11.46},
  annote =	{Keywords: Interactive data analysis, Data visualization, Visual analytics, Data management system, Systems for data science}
}
Document
A Shared Challenge in Behavioural Specification (Dagstuhl Seminar 17462)

Authors: Klaus Havelund, Martin Leucker, Giles Reger, and Volker Stolz


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 17462 "A Shared Challenge in Behavioural Specification". The seminar considered the issue of behavioral specification with a focus on its usage in Runtime Verification. The seminar was motivated by the observations that, whilst the field of Runtime Verification is becoming more mature, there is a lack of common specification language, in the main part due to the rich setting allowing for highly expressive languages. The aim of the Seminar was to shed light on the similarities and differences between the different existing languages, and specifically, suggest directions for future collaboration and research. The seminar consisted of two talk sessions, two working group sessions, and a feedback and reflection session. Working group topics were suggested and agreed in response to points raised in talks. One significant outcome was the proposal of a shared challenge project in which different Runtime Verification approaches can be compared, as outlined in one of the working group reports.

Cite as

Klaus Havelund, Martin Leucker, Giles Reger, and Volker Stolz. A Shared Challenge in Behavioural Specification (Dagstuhl Seminar 17462). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 11, pp. 59-85, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{havelund_et_al:DagRep.7.11.59,
  author =	{Havelund, Klaus and Leucker, Martin and Reger, Giles and Stolz, Volker},
  title =	{{A Shared Challenge in Behavioural Specification (Dagstuhl Seminar 17462)}},
  pages =	{59--85},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Havelund, Klaus and Leucker, Martin and Reger, Giles and Stolz, Volker},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.11.59},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-86716},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.11.59},
  annote =	{Keywords: behavioural specification, dynamic properties, runtime verification, temporal logic}
}
Document
Artificial and Computational Intelligence in Games: AI-Driven Game Design (Dagstuhl Seminar 17471)

Authors: Pieter Spronck, Elisabeth André, Michael Cook, and Mike Preuß


Abstract
With the dramatic growth of the game industry over the past decade, its rapid inclusion in many sectors of today's society, and the increased complexity of games, game development has reached a point where it is no longer humanly possible to use only manual techniques to create games. Large parts of games need to be designed, built, and tested automatically. In recent years, researchers have delved into artificial intelligence techniques to support, assist, and even drive game development. Such techniques include procedural content generation, automated narration, player modelling and adaptation, and automated game design. This research is still very young, but already the games industry is taking small steps to integrate some of these techniques in their approach to design. The goal of this seminar was to bring together researchers and industry representatives who work at the forefront of artificial intelligence (AI) and computational intelligence (CI) in games, to (1) explore and extend the possibilities of AI-driven game design, (2) to identify the most viable applications of AI-driven game design in the game industry, and (3) to investigate new approaches to AI-driven game design. To this end, the seminar included a wide range of researchers and developers, including specialists in AI/CI for abstract games, commercial video games, and serious games. Thus, it fostered a better understanding of and unified vision on AI-driven game design, using input from both scientists as well as AI specialists from industry.

Cite as

Pieter Spronck, Elisabeth André, Michael Cook, and Mike Preuß. Artificial and Computational Intelligence in Games: AI-Driven Game Design (Dagstuhl Seminar 17471). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 11, pp. 86-129, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{spronck_et_al:DagRep.7.11.86,
  author =	{Spronck, Pieter and Andr\'{e}, Elisabeth and Cook, Michael and Preu{\ss}, Mike},
  title =	{{Artificial and Computational Intelligence in Games: AI-Driven Game Design (Dagstuhl Seminar 17471)}},
  pages =	{86--129},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Spronck, Pieter and Andr\'{e}, Elisabeth and Cook, Michael and Preu{\ss}, Mike},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.11.86},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-86722},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.11.86},
  annote =	{Keywords: dynamical systems, entertainment modeling, game design, multi-agent systems, serious games}
}
Document
Addressing the Computational Challenges of Personalized Medicine (Dagstuhl Seminar 17472)

Authors: Niko Beerenwinkel, Holger Fröhlich, and Susan A. Murphy


Abstract
This report provides an overview of the talks and the working group reports from the Dagstuhl Seminar 17472 "Addressing the Computational Challenges of Personalized Medicine". The seminar brought together leading computational scientists with different backgrounds and perspectives in order to allow for a cross-fertilizing and stimulating discussion. It thus joined expertise that is usually scattered in different research communities. In addition, selected medical researchers, pharmacogenomics researchers and behavioral scientists provided their input and established the link of the computational to the more medical aspects of personalized medicine (PM). The talks and corresponding discussion spanned mainly three areas: 1) how to enhance prediction performance of computational models for PM; 2) how to improve their interpretability; 3) how to validate and implement them in practice.

Cite as

Niko Beerenwinkel, Holger Fröhlich, and Susan A. Murphy. Addressing the Computational Challenges of Personalized Medicine (Dagstuhl Seminar 17472). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 11, pp. 130-141, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{beerenwinkel_et_al:DagRep.7.11.130,
  author =	{Beerenwinkel, Niko and Fr\"{o}hlich, Holger and Murphy, Susan A.},
  title =	{{Addressing the Computational Challenges of Personalized Medicine (Dagstuhl Seminar 17472)}},
  pages =	{130--141},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{Beerenwinkel, Niko and Fr\"{o}hlich, Holger and Murphy, Susan A.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.11.130},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-86730},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.11.130},
  annote =	{Keywords: data science, machine learning, computational modeling, bioinformatics, systems biology}
}
Document
Reliable Computation and Complexity on the Reals (Dagstuhl Seminar 17481)

Authors: Norbert T. Müller, Siegfried M. Rump, Klaus Weihrauch, and Martin Ziegler


Abstract
Naive computations with real numbers on computers may cause serious errors. In traditional numerical computation these errors are often neglected or, more seriously, not identified. Two approaches attack this problem and investigate its background, Reliable Computing and Computable Analysis. Methods in Reliable Computing are essentially mathematical theorems, the assumptions of which are verified on the computer. This verification is performed using the very efficient floating point arithmetic. If the verification succeeds, the assertions are true and correct error bounds have been computed; if not, a corresponding message is given. Thus the results are always mathematically correct. A specific advantage of Reliable Computing is that imprecise data are accepted; the challenge is to develop mathematical theorems the assumptions of which can be verified effectively in floating-point and to produce narrow bounds for the solution. Computable Analysis extends the traditional theory of computability on countable sets to the real numbers and more general spaces by refining continuity to computability. Numerous even basic and simple problems are not computable since they cannot be solved continuously. In many cases computability can be refined to computational complexity which is the time or space a Turing machine needs to compute a result with given precision. By treating precision as a parameter, this goes far beyond the restrictions of double precision arithmetic used in Reliable computing. For practical purposes, however, the asymptotic results from complexity theory must be refined. Software libraries provide efficient implementations for exact real computations. Both approaches are established theories with numerous important results. However, despite of their obvious close relations these two areas are developing almost independently. For exploring possibilities of closer contact we have invited experts from both areas to this seminar. For improving the mutual understanding some tutorial-like talks have been included in the program. As a result of the seminar it can be stated that interesting joint research is possible.

Cite as

Norbert T. Müller, Siegfried M. Rump, Klaus Weihrauch, and Martin Ziegler. Reliable Computation and Complexity on the Reals (Dagstuhl Seminar 17481). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 11, pp. 142-167, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{muller_et_al:DagRep.7.11.142,
  author =	{M\"{u}ller, Norbert T. and Rump, Siegfried M. and Weihrauch, Klaus and Ziegler, Martin},
  title =	{{ Reliable Computation and Complexity on the Reals (Dagstuhl Seminar 17481)}},
  pages =	{142--167},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{11},
  editor =	{M\"{u}ller, Norbert T. and Rump, Siegfried M. and Weihrauch, Klaus and Ziegler, Martin},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.11.142},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-86826},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.11.142},
  annote =	{Keywords: Computable Analysis, Verification Methods, Real Complexity Theory, Reliable Computing}
}

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