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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3, March 2019, Complete Issue

Abstract
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3, March 2019, Complete Issue

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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3, March 2019, Complete Issue. In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{DagRep.9.3,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3, March 2019, Complete Issue}},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{3},
  editor =	{},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.3},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-114558},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.3},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3, March 2019, Complete Issue}
}
Document
Front Matter
Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 9, Issue 3, 2019

Abstract
Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 9, Issue 3, 2019

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Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 9, Issue 3, 2019. In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp. i-ii, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{DagRep.9.3.i,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 9, Issue 3, 2019}},
  pages =	{i--ii},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{3},
  editor =	{},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.3.i},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-114522},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.3.i},
  annote =	{Keywords: Table of Contents, Frontmatter}
}
Document
Analysis, Design, and Control of Predictable Interconnected Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 19101)

Authors: Kunal Agrawal, Enrico Bini, and Giovanni Stea


Abstract
We call "Interconnected Systems" any collection of systems distributed over a metric space whose behavior is influenced by its neighborhood. Examples of interconnected systems exist at very different scales: different cores over the same silicon, different sub-systems in vehicles, communicating nodes over either a physical (e.g., optical) network, or - more recently - virtualized network. Examples also exist in contexts which are not related to computing or communication. Smart Grids (of energy production, distribution, and consumption) and Intelligent Transportation Systems are just two notable examples. The common characteristic among all these examples is the presence of a spatially distributed demand of resources (energy, computing, communication bandwidth, etc.) which needs to be matched with a spatially distributed supply. Often times demands and availability of resources of different types (e.g., computing and link bandwidth in virtualized network environments) need to be matched simultaneously. Time predictability is a key requirement for above systems. Despite this, the strong market pressure has often led to ``quick and dirty'' best-effort solutions, which make it extremely challenging to predict the behavior of such systems. Research communities have developed formal theories for predictability which are specialized to each application domain or type of resource (e.g., schedulability analysis for real-time systems or network calculus for communication systems). However, the emerging application domains (virtualized networks, cyber-physical systems, etc.) clearly require a unified, holistic approach. By leveraging the expertise, vision and interactions of scientists that have addressed predictability in different areas, the proposed seminar aims at constructing a common ground for the theory supporting the analysis, the design, and the control of predictable interconnected systems.

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Kunal Agrawal, Enrico Bini, and Giovanni Stea. Analysis, Design, and Control of Predictable Interconnected Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 19101). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp. 1-15, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{agrawal_et_al:DagRep.9.3.1,
  author =	{Agrawal, Kunal and Bini, Enrico and Stea, Giovanni},
  title =	{{Analysis, Design, and Control of Predictable Interconnected Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 19101)}},
  pages =	{1--15},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{3},
  editor =	{Agrawal, Kunal and Bini, Enrico and Stea, Giovanni},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.3.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-112882},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.3.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: distributed resource management, network calculus, real-time systems}
}
Document
3D Morphable Models (Dagstuhl Seminar 19102)

Authors: Bernhard Egger, William Smith, Christian Theobalt, and Thomas Vetter


Abstract
3D Morphable Models is a statistical object model separating shape from appearance variation. Typically, they are used as a statistical prior in computer graphics and vision. This report summarizes the Dagstuhl seminar on 3D Morphable Models, March 3-8, 2019. It was a first specific meeting of a broader group of people working with 3D Morphable Models of faces and bodies. This meeting of 26 researchers was held 20 years after the seminal work was published at Siggraph. We summarize the discussions, presentations and results of this workshop.

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Bernhard Egger, William Smith, Christian Theobalt, and Thomas Vetter. 3D Morphable Models (Dagstuhl Seminar 19102). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp. 16-38, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{egger_et_al:DagRep.9.3.16,
  author =	{Egger, Bernhard and Smith, William and Theobalt, Christian and Vetter, Thomas},
  title =	{{3D Morphable Models (Dagstuhl Seminar 19102)}},
  pages =	{16--38},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{3},
  editor =	{Egger, Bernhard and Smith, William and Theobalt, Christian and Vetter, Thomas},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.3.16},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-112894},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.3.16},
  annote =	{Keywords: 3D Computer Vision, Analysis-by-Synthesis, Computer Graphics, Generative Models, Statistical Modelling}
}
Document
Theoretical Foundations of Storage Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 19111)

Authors: Martin Farach-Colton, Inge Li Gørtz, Rob Johnson, and Donald E. Porter


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 19111 "Theoretical Foundations of Storage Systems." This seminar brought together researchers from two distinct communities - algorithms researchers with an interest in external memory and systems researchers with an interest in storage - with the objective of improving the design of future storage systems.

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Martin Farach-Colton, Inge Li Gørtz, Rob Johnson, and Donald E. Porter. Theoretical Foundations of Storage Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 19111). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp. 39-51, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{farachcolton_et_al:DagRep.9.3.39,
  author =	{Farach-Colton, Martin and G{\o}rtz, Inge Li and Johnson, Rob and Porter, Donald E.},
  title =	{{Theoretical Foundations of Storage Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 19111)}},
  pages =	{39--51},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{3},
  editor =	{Farach-Colton, Martin and G{\o}rtz, Inge Li and Johnson, Rob and Porter, Donald E.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.3.39},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-112909},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.3.39},
  annote =	{Keywords: Storage Systems, External Memory Algorithms}
}
Document
Engineering Reliable Multiagent Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 19112)

Authors: Jürgen Dix, Brian Logan, and Michael Winikoff


Abstract
This report documents the program and outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 19112 "Engineering Reliable Multiagent Systems". The aim of this seminar was to bring together researchers from various scientific disciplines, such as software engineering of autonomous systems, software verification, and relevant subareas of AI, such as ethics and machine learning, to discuss the emerging topic of the reliability of (multi-)agent systems and autonomous systems in particular. The ultimate aim of the seminar was to establish a new research agenda for engineering reliable autonomous systems.

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Jürgen Dix, Brian Logan, and Michael Winikoff. Engineering Reliable Multiagent Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 19112). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp. 52-63, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{dix_et_al:DagRep.9.3.52,
  author =	{Dix, J\"{u}rgen and Logan, Brian and Winikoff, Michael},
  title =	{{Engineering Reliable Multiagent Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 19112)}},
  pages =	{52--63},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{3},
  editor =	{Dix, J\"{u}rgen and Logan, Brian and Winikoff, Michael},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.3.52},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-112912},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.3.52},
  annote =	{Keywords: agent-oriented programming, multi agent systems, reliability, software and verification methodologies}
}
Document
Computational Complexity of Discrete Problems (Dagstuhl Seminar 19121)

Authors: Anna Gál, Rahul Santhanam, and Till Tantau


Abstract
The following report archives the presentations and activities of the March 2019 Dagstuhl Seminar 19121 "Computational Complexity of Discrete Problems". Section 1 summarizes the topics and some specific results offered in selected talks during the course of the week. Section 2 provides a table of contents, listing each of the talks given in alphabetical order. Section 3 contains the abstracts, indicating both the main reference and other relevant sources (where applicable) to allow the reader to investigate the topics further.

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Anna Gál, Rahul Santhanam, and Till Tantau. Computational Complexity of Discrete Problems (Dagstuhl Seminar 19121). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp. 64-82, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{gal_et_al:DagRep.9.3.64,
  author =	{G\'{a}l, Anna and Santhanam, Rahul and Tantau, Till},
  title =	{{Computational Complexity of Discrete Problems (Dagstuhl Seminar 19121)}},
  pages =	{64--82},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{3},
  editor =	{G\'{a}l, Anna and Santhanam, Rahul and Tantau, Till},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.3.64},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-112920},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.3.64},
  annote =	{Keywords: circuit complexity, communication complexity, computational complexity, parametrisation, randomness}
}
Document
Algorithmic Problems in Group Theory (Dagstuhl Seminar 19131)

Authors: Volker Diekert, Olga Kharlampovich, Markus Lohrey, and Alexei Myasnikov


Abstract
Since its early days, combinatorial group theory was deeply interwoven with computability theory. In the last 20 years we have seen many new successful interactions between group theory and computer science. On one hand, groups played an important rule in many developments in complexity theory and automata theory. On the other hand, concepts from these computer science fields as well as efficient algorithms, cryptography, and data compression led to the formulation of new questions in group theory. The Dagstuhl Seminar Algorithmic Problems in Group Theory was aimed at bringing together researchers from group theory and computer science so that they can share their expertise. This report documents the material presented during the course of the seminar.

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Volker Diekert, Olga Kharlampovich, Markus Lohrey, and Alexei Myasnikov. Algorithmic Problems in Group Theory (Dagstuhl Seminar 19131). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp. 83-110, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{diekert_et_al:DagRep.9.3.83,
  author =	{Diekert, Volker and Kharlampovich, Olga and Lohrey, Markus and Myasnikov, Alexei},
  title =	{{Algorithmic Problems in Group Theory (Dagstuhl Seminar 19131)}},
  pages =	{83--110},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{3},
  editor =	{Diekert, Volker and Kharlampovich, Olga and Lohrey, Markus and Myasnikov, Alexei},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.3.83},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-112939},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.3.83},
  annote =	{Keywords: algorithmic group theory; generic-case complexity; circuit complexity; diophantine theories}
}
Document
Users and automated driving systems: How will we interact with tomorrow's vehicles? (Dagstuhl Seminar 19132)

Authors: Susanne Boll, Andrew L. Kun, Andreas Riener, and C.Y. David Yang


Abstract
In today's vehicles, the driving task is increasingly often shared between the driver and the vehicle. It is expected that this will become the norm rather than the exception in the foreseeable future: on some road segments the driving task will be automated, and drivers will become passengers. Thus, we need to design automotive user interfaces with partial automation, and even full automation, in mind. This was the underlying motivation to propose and run this seminar. In the Dagstuhl seminar, six inter-related key research questions were addressed: First, "how to design user interfaces to support the driver's transition back from the role of passenger to the role of driver?". Second, "how user interfaces can support work and play for drivers while the vehicle is controlled by automation?" and third "how we can support communication between all transportation users, from drivers, to pedestrians, to bicyclists?". Furthermore, we explored "how the design of automotive user interfaces affects trust in automation?" and finally discussed "how novel technologies, such as augmented reality displays or advanced spoken dialogue systems can support drivers, and others, in and around partially-, and fully-automated vehicles?". As an umbrella topic, the question "how all of these questions relate to the legal aspects of deploying automotive user interfaces?" received also high attention and lively discussions amongst participants. Dagstuhl seminar 19132 is a follow-up of the 2016 Dagstuhl seminar 16262 "Automotive User Interfaces in the Age of Automation" and brought (again) together researchers from HCI, psychology, cognitive science, human factors, automotive industry/OEMs and people active in the standardization process to discuss critical problems on the way to automated driving.

Cite as

Susanne Boll, Andrew L. Kun, Andreas Riener, and C.Y. David Yang. Users and automated driving systems: How will we interact with tomorrow's vehicles? (Dagstuhl Seminar 19132). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp. 111-178, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{boll_et_al:DagRep.9.3.111,
  author =	{Boll, Susanne and Kun, Andrew L. and Riener, Andreas and Yang, C.Y. David},
  title =	{{Users and automated driving systems: How will we interact with tomorrow's vehicles? (Dagstuhl Seminar 19132)}},
  pages =	{111--178},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{3},
  editor =	{Boll, Susanne and Kun, Andrew L. and Riener, Andreas and Yang, C.Y. David},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.3.111},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-112944},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.3.111},
  annote =	{Keywords: Automotive UIs; Driver-vehicle interaction services; UX in driving; Customization of vehicles/UIs; (Over)trust; Ethical issues}
}
Document
Programmable Network Data Planes (Dagstuhl Seminar 19141)

Authors: Gianni Antichi, Theophilus Benson, Nate Foster, Fernando M. V. Ramos, and Justine Sherry


Abstract
Software-Defined Networking (SDN) started the "softwarization" of networking. By relocating the control plane onto a logically centralized machine, SDN gave programmers the ability to specify the behavior of the network directly in software, unleashing a major transformation both in the networking research community and in industry. However, a key limitation of the original SDN vision was the limited functionality exposed in protocols such as OpenFlow. Recent efforts to develop reconfigurable data planes and high-level network programming languages has made it possible to truly program the data plane -- i.e., to change the way packets are processed on network devices. The ability to fully program the network-both control and data plane-is expected have a profound impact on the field of networking in the coming years. In this seminar we discussed the key questions and problems to be addressed in the next 10 years on the area of programmable dataplanes, and how they will potentially shape the future of networking. As an outcome we are now working on a research agenda to serve as the start of a discussion with networking researchers, practitioners, and the industry as a whole. This report is a first step towards that goal.

Cite as

Gianni Antichi, Theophilus Benson, Nate Foster, Fernando M. V. Ramos, and Justine Sherry. Programmable Network Data Planes (Dagstuhl Seminar 19141). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp. 178-201, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@Article{antichi_et_al:DagRep.9.3.178,
  author =	{Antichi, Gianni and Benson, Theophilus and Foster, Nate and Ramos, Fernando M. V. and Sherry, Justine},
  title =	{{Programmable Network Data Planes (Dagstuhl Seminar 19141)}},
  pages =	{178--201},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{9},
  number =	{3},
  editor =	{Antichi, Gianni and Benson, Theophilus and Foster, Nate and Ramos, Fernando M. V. and Sherry, Justine},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.9.3.178},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-112958},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.9.3.178},
  annote =	{Keywords: programmable data planes, software-defined networks, programmable networks}
}

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