Volume

Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 8141



Publication Details

  • published at: 2008-07-23
  • Publisher: Schloss-Dagstuhl - Leibniz Zentrum für Informatik

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Document
08141 Abstracts Collection – Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization

Authors: Kirstie Bellman, Mike Hinchey, Christian Müller-Schloer, Hartmut Schmeck, and Rolf Würtz


Abstract
From March 30th to April 4th 2008, the Dagstuhl Seminar 08141 "Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization"' was held in the International Conference and Research Center (IBFI), Schloss Dagstuhl. During the seminar, several participants presented their current research, and ongoing work and open problems were discussed. Abstracts of the presentations given during the seminar as well as abstracts of seminar results and ideas are put together in this paper. The first section describes the seminar topics and goals in general. Links to extended abstracts or full papers are provided, if available.

Cite as

Kirstie Bellman, Mike Hinchey, Christian Müller-Schloer, Hartmut Schmeck, and Rolf Würtz. 08141 Abstracts Collection – Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization. In Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 8141, pp. 1-17, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2008)


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@InProceedings{bellman_et_al:DagSemProc.08141.1,
  author =	{Bellman, Kirstie and Hinchey, Mike and M\"{u}ller-Schloer, Christian and Schmeck, Hartmut and W\"{u}rtz, Rolf},
  title =	{{08141 Abstracts Collection – Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization}},
  booktitle =	{Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization},
  pages =	{1--17},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2008},
  volume =	{8141},
  editor =	{Kirstie Bellman and Michael G. Hinchey and Christian M\"{u}ller-Schloer and Hartmut Schmeck and Rolf W\"{u}rtz},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.08141.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-15675},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.08141.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: Organic computing, self-organisation, design, adaptivity}
}
Document
08141 Executive Summary – Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization

Authors: Kirstie Bellman, Mike Hinchey, Christian Müller-Schloer, Hartmut Schmeck, and Rolf Würtz


Abstract
Organic Computing (OC) has become a challenging vision for the design of future information processing systems: As they become increasingly powerful, cheaper and smaller, our environment will be filled with collections of autonomous systems equipped with sensors and actuators to be aware of their environment, to communicate, and to organize themselves in order to perform the actions and servic-es that seem to be required. However, due to increasing complexity we will not be able to explicitly design and manage all intelligent components of a digitally enhanced environment in every detail and anticipate every possible configuration. Therefore, our technical systems will have to act more independently, flexibly, and autonomously, i.e., they will have to exhibit life-like properties. We call such systems "organic". Hence, an "Organic Computing System" is a technical system, which adapts dynamically to the current conditions of its environment. It will be self-organizing, self-configuring, self-healing, self-protecting, self-explaining, and context-aware.

Cite as

Kirstie Bellman, Mike Hinchey, Christian Müller-Schloer, Hartmut Schmeck, and Rolf Würtz. 08141 Executive Summary – Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization. In Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 8141, pp. 1-4, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2008)


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@InProceedings{bellman_et_al:DagSemProc.08141.2,
  author =	{Bellman, Kirstie and Hinchey, Mike and M\"{u}ller-Schloer, Christian and Schmeck, Hartmut and W\"{u}rtz, Rolf},
  title =	{{08141 Executive Summary – Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization}},
  booktitle =	{Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization},
  pages =	{1--4},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2008},
  volume =	{8141},
  editor =	{Kirstie Bellman and Michael G. Hinchey and Christian M\"{u}ller-Schloer and Hartmut Schmeck and Rolf W\"{u}rtz},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.08141.2},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-15660},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.08141.2},
  annote =	{Keywords: Organic Computing}
}
Document
A Generic Framework for the Engineering of Self-Adaptive and Self-Organising Systems

Authors: Giovanna Di Marzo Serugendo, John Fitzgerald, Alexander Romanovsky, and Nicolas Guelfi


Abstract
This paper provides a unifying view for the engineering of self-adaptive (SA) and self-organising (SO) systems. We first identify requirements for designing and building trustworthy self-adaptive and self-organising systems. Second, we propose a generic framework combining design-time and run-time features, which permit the definition and analysis at design-time of mechanisms that both ensure and constrain the run-time behaviour of an SA or SO system, thereby providing some assurance of its self-* capabilities. We show how this framework applies to both an SA and an SO system, and discuss several current proof-of-concept studies on the enabling technologies.

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Giovanna Di Marzo Serugendo, John Fitzgerald, Alexander Romanovsky, and Nicolas Guelfi. A Generic Framework for the Engineering of Self-Adaptive and Self-Organising Systems. In Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 8141, pp. 1-16, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2008)


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@InProceedings{dimarzoserugendo_et_al:DagSemProc.08141.3,
  author =	{Di Marzo Serugendo, Giovanna and Fitzgerald, John and Romanovsky, Alexander and Guelfi, Nicolas},
  title =	{{A Generic Framework for the Engineering of Self-Adaptive and Self-Organising Systems}},
  booktitle =	{Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization},
  pages =	{1--16},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2008},
  volume =	{8141},
  editor =	{Kirstie Bellman and Michael G. Hinchey and Christian M\"{u}ller-Schloer and Hartmut Schmeck and Rolf W\"{u}rtz},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.08141.3},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-15637},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.08141.3},
  annote =	{Keywords: Metadata, policies, self-adaptive, self-organising, software architecture}
}
Document
A Virtual Layer for FPGA Based Parallel Systems (MP-SoCs)

Authors: Andreas Hofmann and Klaus Waldschmidt


Abstract
Besides performance and time to market, robustness and reliability are important design targets for modern Systemson- Chip (SoCs). Despite these features the power consumption must be as low as possible. To meet these design goals parallel, flexible, and adaptive architectures are required [1]. Today, dynamically reconfigurable FPGAs are well suited to form a parallel architecture because they incorporate serveral hard- and softcores. To efficiently use such multicore systems a hardware independent system must be created which handles all cores. Further, optimizing the power management the number of active cores must be adapted dynamically to the current workload. To make these features manageable and augment the system with adaptivity a virtual layer is required which hides the – due to runtime reconfiguration – changing hardware system from the application software. The Scalable Dataflow-driven Virtual Machine [2] is such a virtualization of a parallel, adaptive and heterogeneous cluster of processing elements (PE). Thus, it is well suited to serve as a managing firmware for multicore FPGAs.

Cite as

Andreas Hofmann and Klaus Waldschmidt. A Virtual Layer for FPGA Based Parallel Systems (MP-SoCs). In Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 8141, pp. 1-2, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2008)


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@InProceedings{hofmann_et_al:DagSemProc.08141.4,
  author =	{Hofmann, Andreas and Waldschmidt, Klaus},
  title =	{{A Virtual Layer for FPGA Based Parallel Systems (MP-SoCs)}},
  booktitle =	{Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization},
  pages =	{1--2},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2008},
  volume =	{8141},
  editor =	{Kirstie Bellman and Michael G. Hinchey and Christian M\"{u}ller-Schloer and Hartmut Schmeck and Rolf W\"{u}rtz},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.08141.4},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-15610},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.08141.4},
  annote =	{Keywords: }
}
Document
Biologically Inspired Methods for Organizing Distributed Services on Sensor Networks

Authors: Franz Rammig, Tales Heimfarth, and Peter Janacik


Abstract
We propose to make use of a completely distributed way of implementing OS services for wireless sensor networks (WSN). I.e. instead of having an instance of the OS on each node of a WSN the services of the OS are distributed over the WSN. Of course this approach implies specific challenges. Two of them are discussed in the paper: Migration of services to nodes such that the overall communication costs are minimized and forming clusters with the tendency to concentrate service requests inside the clusters and at the same time minimizing intra-cluster communication. For both problems biologically inspired solutions are discussed. Service migration is mapped on an Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) technique while as a clustering heuristics Division of Labor in swarms of social insects is used.

Cite as

Franz Rammig, Tales Heimfarth, and Peter Janacik. Biologically Inspired Methods for Organizing Distributed Services on Sensor Networks. In Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 8141, pp. 1-8, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2008)


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@InProceedings{rammig_et_al:DagSemProc.08141.5,
  author =	{Rammig, Franz and Heimfarth, Tales and Janacik, Peter},
  title =	{{Biologically Inspired Methods for Organizing Distributed Services on Sensor Networks}},
  booktitle =	{Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization},
  pages =	{1--8},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2008},
  volume =	{8141},
  editor =	{Kirstie Bellman and Michael G. Hinchey and Christian M\"{u}ller-Schloer and Hartmut Schmeck and Rolf W\"{u}rtz},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.08141.5},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-15656},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.08141.5},
  annote =	{Keywords: Wireless Sensor Networks, clustering, service migration, Ant Colony Algorithms}
}
Document
Current state of ASoC design methodology

Authors: Andreas Bernauer, Dirk Fritz, Björn Sander, Oliver Bringmann, and Wolfgang Rosenstiel


Abstract
This paper gives an overview of the current state of ASoC design methodology and presents preliminary results on evaluating the learning classifier system XCS for the control of a QuadCore. The ASoC design methodology can determine system reliability based on activity, power and temperature analysis, together with reliability block diagrams. The evaluation of the XCS shows that in the evaluated setup, XCS can find optimal operating points, even in changed environments or with changed reward functions. This even works, though limited, without the genetic algorithm the XCS uses internally. The results motivate us to continue the evaluation for more complex setups.

Cite as

Andreas Bernauer, Dirk Fritz, Björn Sander, Oliver Bringmann, and Wolfgang Rosenstiel. Current state of ASoC design methodology. In Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization. Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, Volume 8141, pp. 1-17, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2008)


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@InProceedings{bernauer_et_al:DagSemProc.08141.6,
  author =	{Bernauer, Andreas and Fritz, Dirk and Sander, Bj\"{o}rn and Bringmann, Oliver and Rosenstiel, Wolfgang},
  title =	{{Current state of ASoC design methodology}},
  booktitle =	{Organic Computing - Controlled Self-organization},
  pages =	{1--17},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings (DagSemProc)},
  ISSN =	{1862-4405},
  year =	{2008},
  volume =	{8141},
  editor =	{Kirstie Bellman and Michael G. Hinchey and Christian M\"{u}ller-Schloer and Hartmut Schmeck and Rolf W\"{u}rtz},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagSemProc.08141.6},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-15646},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagSemProc.08141.6},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings, System-on-Chip, design methodology, system reliability, learning classifier system, XCS, ASoC}
}

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