Search Results

Documents authored by Brakerski, Zvika


Document
On the Computational Hardness Needed for Quantum Cryptography

Authors: Zvika Brakerski, Ran Canetti, and Luowen Qian

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 251, 14th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2023)


Abstract
In the classical model of computation, it is well established that one-way functions (OWF) are minimal for computational cryptography: They are essential for almost any cryptographic application that cannot be realized with respect to computationally unbounded adversaries. In the quantum setting, however, OWFs appear not to be essential (Kretschmer 2021; Ananth et al., Morimae and Yamakawa 2022), and the question of whether such a minimal primitive exists remains open. We consider EFI pairs - efficiently samplable, statistically far but computationally indistinguishable pairs of (mixed) quantum states. Building on the work of Yan (2022), which shows equivalence between EFI pairs and statistical commitment schemes, we show that EFI pairs are necessary for a large class of quantum-cryptographic applications. Specifically, we construct EFI pairs from minimalistic versions of commitments schemes, oblivious transfer, and general secure multiparty computation, as well as from QCZK proofs from essentially any non-trivial language. We also construct quantum computational zero knowledge (QCZK) proofs for all of QIP from any EFI pair. This suggests that, for much of quantum cryptography, EFI pairs play a similar role to that played by OWFs in the classical setting: they are simple to describe, essential, and also serve as a linchpin for demonstrating equivalence between primitives.

Cite as

Zvika Brakerski, Ran Canetti, and Luowen Qian. On the Computational Hardness Needed for Quantum Cryptography. In 14th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2023). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 251, pp. 24:1-24:21, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2023)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@InProceedings{brakerski_et_al:LIPIcs.ITCS.2023.24,
  author =	{Brakerski, Zvika and Canetti, Ran and Qian, Luowen},
  title =	{{On the Computational Hardness Needed for Quantum Cryptography}},
  booktitle =	{14th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2023)},
  pages =	{24:1--24:21},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-263-1},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2023},
  volume =	{251},
  editor =	{Tauman Kalai, Yael},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2023.24},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-175278},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2023.24},
  annote =	{Keywords: quantum cryptography, efi, commitment scheme, oblivious transfer, zero knowledge, secure multiparty computation}
}
Document
Track A: Algorithms, Complexity and Games
Factoring and Pairings Are Not Necessary for IO: Circular-Secure LWE Suffices

Authors: Zvika Brakerski, Nico Döttling, Sanjam Garg, and Giulio Malavolta

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 229, 49th International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2022)


Abstract
We construct indistinguishability obfuscation (iO) solely under circular-security properties of encryption schemes based on the Learning with Errors (LWE) problem. Circular-security assumptions were used before to construct (non-leveled) fully-homomorphic encryption (FHE), but our assumption is stronger and requires circular randomness-leakage-resilience. In contrast with prior works, this assumption can be conjectured to be post-quantum secure; yielding the first provably secure iO construction that is (plausibly) post-quantum secure. Our work follows the high-level outline of the recent work of Gay and Pass [STOC 2021], who showed a way to remove the heuristic step from the homomorphic-encryption based iO approach of Brakerski, Döttling, Garg, and Malavolta [EUROCRYPT 2020]. They thus obtain a construction proved secure under circular security assumption of natural homomorphic encryption schemes - specifically, they use homomorphic encryption schemes based on LWE and DCR, respectively. In this work we show how to remove the DCR assumption and remain with a scheme based on the circular security of LWE alone. Along the way we relax some of the requirements in the Gay-Pass blueprint and thus obtain a scheme that is secure under a different assumption. Specifically, we do not require security in the presence of a key-cycle, but rather only in the presence of a key-randomness cycle. An additional contribution of our work is to point out a problem in one of the building blocks used by many iO candidates, including all existing provable post-quantum candidates. Namely, in the transformation from exponentially-efficient iO (XiO) from Lin, Pass, Seth and Telang [PKC 2016]. We show why their transformation inherently falls short of achieving the desired goal, and then rectify this situation by showing that shallow XiO (i.e. one where the obfuscator is depth-bounded) does translate to iO using LWE.

Cite as

Zvika Brakerski, Nico Döttling, Sanjam Garg, and Giulio Malavolta. Factoring and Pairings Are Not Necessary for IO: Circular-Secure LWE Suffices. In 49th International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2022). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 229, pp. 28:1-28:20, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@InProceedings{brakerski_et_al:LIPIcs.ICALP.2022.28,
  author =	{Brakerski, Zvika and D\"{o}ttling, Nico and Garg, Sanjam and Malavolta, Giulio},
  title =	{{Factoring and Pairings Are Not Necessary for IO: Circular-Secure LWE Suffices}},
  booktitle =	{49th International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2022)},
  pages =	{28:1--28:20},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-235-8},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{229},
  editor =	{Boja\'{n}czyk, Miko{\l}aj and Merelli, Emanuela and Woodruff, David P.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ICALP.2022.28},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-163699},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ICALP.2022.28},
  annote =	{Keywords: Cryptography, Obfuscation}
}
Document
Lattice-Inspired Broadcast Encryption and Succinct Ciphertext-Policy ABE

Authors: Zvika Brakerski and Vinod Vaikuntanathan

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 215, 13th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2022)


Abstract
Broadcast encryption remains one of the few remaining central cryptographic primitives that are not yet known to be achievable under a standard cryptographic assumption (excluding obfuscation-based constructions, see below). Furthermore, prior to this work, there were no known direct candidates for post-quantum-secure broadcast encryption. We propose a candidate ciphertext-policy attribute-based encryption (CP-ABE) scheme for circuits, where the ciphertext size depends only on the depth of the policy circuit (and not its size). This, in particular, gives us a Broadcast Encryption (BE) scheme where the size of the keys and ciphertexts have a poly-logarithmic dependence on the number of users. This goal was previously only known to be achievable assuming ideal multilinear maps (Boneh, Waters and Zhandry, Crypto 2014) or indistinguishability obfuscation (Boneh and Zhandry, Crypto 2014) and in a concurrent work from generic bilinear groups and the learning with errors (LWE) assumption (Agrawal and Yamada, Eurocrypt 2020). Our construction relies on techniques from lattice-based (and in particular LWE-based) cryptography. We analyze some attempts at cryptanalysis, but we are unable to provide a security proof.

Cite as

Zvika Brakerski and Vinod Vaikuntanathan. Lattice-Inspired Broadcast Encryption and Succinct Ciphertext-Policy ABE. In 13th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2022). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 215, pp. 28:1-28:20, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@InProceedings{brakerski_et_al:LIPIcs.ITCS.2022.28,
  author =	{Brakerski, Zvika and Vaikuntanathan, Vinod},
  title =	{{Lattice-Inspired Broadcast Encryption and Succinct Ciphertext-Policy ABE}},
  booktitle =	{13th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2022)},
  pages =	{28:1--28:20},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-217-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{215},
  editor =	{Braverman, Mark},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2022.28},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-156243},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2022.28},
  annote =	{Keywords: Theoretical Cryptography, Broadcast Encryption, Attribute-Based Encryption, Lattice-Based Cryptography}
}
Document
RANDOM
On the Hardness of Average-Case k-SUM

Authors: Zvika Brakerski, Noah Stephens-Davidowitz, and Vinod Vaikuntanathan

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 207, Approximation, Randomization, and Combinatorial Optimization. Algorithms and Techniques (APPROX/RANDOM 2021)


Abstract
In this work, we show the first worst-case to average-case reduction for the classical k-SUM problem. A k-SUM instance is a collection of m integers, and the goal of the k-SUM problem is to find a subset of k integers that sums to 0. In the average-case version, the m elements are chosen uniformly at random from some interval [-u,u]. We consider the total setting where m is sufficiently large (with respect to u and k), so that we are guaranteed (with high probability) that solutions must exist. In particular, m = u^{Ω(1/k)} suffices for totality. Much of the appeal of k-SUM, in particular connections to problems in computational geometry, extends to the total setting. The best known algorithm in the average-case total setting is due to Wagner (following the approach of Blum-Kalai-Wasserman), and achieves a running time of u^{Θ(1/log k)} when m = u^{Θ(1/log k)}. This beats the known (conditional) lower bounds for worst-case k-SUM, raising the natural question of whether it can be improved even further. However, in this work, we show a matching average-case lower bound, by showing a reduction from worst-case lattice problems, thus introducing a new family of techniques into the field of fine-grained complexity. In particular, we show that any algorithm solving average-case k-SUM on m elements in time u^{o(1/log k)} will give a super-polynomial improvement in the complexity of algorithms for lattice problems.

Cite as

Zvika Brakerski, Noah Stephens-Davidowitz, and Vinod Vaikuntanathan. On the Hardness of Average-Case k-SUM. In Approximation, Randomization, and Combinatorial Optimization. Algorithms and Techniques (APPROX/RANDOM 2021). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 207, pp. 29:1-29:19, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2021)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@InProceedings{brakerski_et_al:LIPIcs.APPROX/RANDOM.2021.29,
  author =	{Brakerski, Zvika and Stephens-Davidowitz, Noah and Vaikuntanathan, Vinod},
  title =	{{On the Hardness of Average-Case k-SUM}},
  booktitle =	{Approximation, Randomization, and Combinatorial Optimization. Algorithms and Techniques (APPROX/RANDOM 2021)},
  pages =	{29:1--29:19},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-207-5},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2021},
  volume =	{207},
  editor =	{Wootters, Mary and Sanit\`{a}, Laura},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.APPROX/RANDOM.2021.29},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-147223},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.APPROX/RANDOM.2021.29},
  annote =	{Keywords: k-SUM, fine-grained complexity, average-case hardness}
}
Document
Simpler Proofs of Quantumness

Authors: Zvika Brakerski, Venkata Koppula, Umesh Vazirani, and Thomas Vidick

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 158, 15th Conference on the Theory of Quantum Computation, Communication and Cryptography (TQC 2020)


Abstract
A proof of quantumness is a method for provably demonstrating (to a classical verifier) that a quantum device can perform computational tasks that a classical device with comparable resources cannot. Providing a proof of quantumness is the first step towards constructing a useful quantum computer. There are currently three approaches for exhibiting proofs of quantumness: (i) Inverting a classically-hard one-way function (e.g. using Shor’s algorithm). This seems technologically out of reach. (ii) Sampling from a classically-hard-to-sample distribution (e.g. BosonSampling). This may be within reach of near-term experiments, but for all such tasks known verification requires exponential time. (iii) Interactive protocols based on cryptographic assumptions. The use of a trapdoor scheme allows for efficient verification, and implementation seems to require much less resources than (i), yet still more than (ii). In this work we propose a significant simplification to approach (iii) by employing the random oracle heuristic. (We note that we do not apply the Fiat-Shamir paradigm.) We give a two-message (challenge-response) proof of quantumness based on any trapdoor claw-free function. In contrast to earlier proposals we do not need an adaptive hard-core bit property. This allows the use of smaller security parameters and more diverse computational assumptions (such as Ring Learning with Errors), significantly reducing the quantum computational effort required for a successful demonstration.

Cite as

Zvika Brakerski, Venkata Koppula, Umesh Vazirani, and Thomas Vidick. Simpler Proofs of Quantumness. In 15th Conference on the Theory of Quantum Computation, Communication and Cryptography (TQC 2020). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 158, pp. 8:1-8:14, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2020)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@InProceedings{brakerski_et_al:LIPIcs.TQC.2020.8,
  author =	{Brakerski, Zvika and Koppula, Venkata and Vazirani, Umesh and Vidick, Thomas},
  title =	{{Simpler Proofs of Quantumness}},
  booktitle =	{15th Conference on the Theory of Quantum Computation, Communication and Cryptography (TQC 2020)},
  pages =	{8:1--8:14},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-146-7},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2020},
  volume =	{158},
  editor =	{Flammia, Steven T.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.TQC.2020.8},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-120677},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.TQC.2020.8},
  annote =	{Keywords: Proof of Quantumness, Random Oracle, Learning with Errors}
}
Document
Separating Two-Round Secure Computation From Oblivious Transfer

Authors: Benny Applebaum, Zvika Brakerski, Sanjam Garg, Yuval Ishai, and Akshayaram Srinivasan

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 151, 11th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2020)


Abstract
We consider the question of minimizing the round complexity of protocols for secure multiparty computation (MPC) with security against an arbitrary number of semi-honest parties. Very recently, Garg and Srinivasan (Eurocrypt 2018) and Benhamouda and Lin (Eurocrypt 2018) constructed such 2-round MPC protocols from minimal assumptions. This was done by showing a round preserving reduction to the task of secure 2-party computation of the oblivious transfer functionality (OT). These constructions made a novel non-black-box use of the underlying OT protocol. The question remained whether this can be done by only making black-box use of 2-round OT. This is of theoretical and potentially also practical value as black-box use of primitives tends to lead to more efficient constructions. Our main result proves that such a black-box construction is impossible, namely that non-black-box use of OT is necessary. As a corollary, a similar separation holds when starting with any 2-party functionality other than OT. As a secondary contribution, we prove several additional results that further clarify the landscape of black-box MPC with minimal interaction. In particular, we complement the separation from 2-party functionalities by presenting a complete 4-party functionality, give evidence for the difficulty of ruling out a complete 3-party functionality and for the difficulty of ruling out black-box constructions of 3-round MPC from 2-round OT, and separate a relaxed "non-compact" variant of 2-party homomorphic secret sharing from 2-round OT.

Cite as

Benny Applebaum, Zvika Brakerski, Sanjam Garg, Yuval Ishai, and Akshayaram Srinivasan. Separating Two-Round Secure Computation From Oblivious Transfer. In 11th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2020). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 151, pp. 71:1-71:18, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2020)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@InProceedings{applebaum_et_al:LIPIcs.ITCS.2020.71,
  author =	{Applebaum, Benny and Brakerski, Zvika and Garg, Sanjam and Ishai, Yuval and Srinivasan, Akshayaram},
  title =	{{Separating Two-Round Secure Computation From Oblivious Transfer}},
  booktitle =	{11th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2020)},
  pages =	{71:1--71:18},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-134-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2020},
  volume =	{151},
  editor =	{Vidick, Thomas},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2020.71},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-117560},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2020.71},
  annote =	{Keywords: Oracle Separation, Oblivious Transfer, Secure Multiparty Computation}
}
Document
Brief Announcement
Brief Announcement: Zero-Knowledge Protocols for Search Problems

Authors: Ben Berger and Zvika Brakerski

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 107, 45th International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2018)


Abstract
We consider natural ways to extend the notion of Zero-Knowledge (ZK) Proofs beyond decision problems. Specifically, we consider search problems, and define zero-knowledge proofs in this context as interactive protocols in which the prover can establish the correctness of a solution to a given instance without the verifier learning anything beyond the intended solution, even if it deviates from the protocol. The goal of this work is to initiate a study of Search Zero-Knowledge (search-ZK), the class of search problems for which such systems exist. This class trivially contains search problems where the validity of a solution can be efficiently verified (using a single message proof containing only the solution). A slightly less obvious, but still straightforward, way to obtain zero-knowledge proofs for search problems is to let the prover send a solution and prove in zero-knowledge that the instance-solution pair is valid. However, there may be other ways to obtain such zero-knowledge proofs, and they may be more advantageous. In fact, we prove that there are search problems for which the aforementioned approach fails, but still search zero-knowledge protocols exist. On the other hand, we show sufficient conditions for search problems under which some form of zero-knowledge can be obtained using the straightforward way.

Cite as

Ben Berger and Zvika Brakerski. Brief Announcement: Zero-Knowledge Protocols for Search Problems. In 45th International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2018). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 107, pp. 105:1-105:5, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@InProceedings{berger_et_al:LIPIcs.ICALP.2018.105,
  author =	{Berger, Ben and Brakerski, Zvika},
  title =	{{Brief Announcement: Zero-Knowledge Protocols for Search Problems}},
  booktitle =	{45th International Colloquium on Automata, Languages, and Programming (ICALP 2018)},
  pages =	{105:1--105:5},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-076-7},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{107},
  editor =	{Chatzigiannakis, Ioannis and Kaklamanis, Christos and Marx, D\'{a}niel and Sannella, Donald},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ICALP.2018.105},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-91099},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ICALP.2018.105},
  annote =	{Keywords: Zero-Knowledge, Search Problems, Interactive Proofs}
}
Document
Hierarchical Functional Encryption

Authors: Zvika Brakerski, Nishanth Chandran, Vipul Goyal, Aayush Jain, Amit Sahai, and Gil Segev

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 67, 8th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2017)


Abstract
Functional encryption provides fine-grained access control for encrypted data, allowing each user to learn only specific functions of the encrypted data. We study the notion of hierarchical functional encryption, which augments functional encryption with delegation capabilities, offering significantly more expressive access control. We present a generic transformation that converts any general-purpose public-key functional encryption scheme into a hierarchical one without relying on any additional assumptions. This significantly refines our understanding of the power of functional encryption, showing that the existence of functional encryption is equivalent to that of its hierarchical generalization. Instantiating our transformation with the existing functional encryption schemes yields a variety of hierarchical schemes offering various trade-offs between their delegation capabilities (i.e., the depth and width of their hierarchical structures) and underlying assumptions. When starting with a scheme secure against an unbounded number of collusions, we can support arbitrary hierarchical structures. In addition, even when starting with schemes that are secure against a bounded number of collusions (which are known to exist under rather minimal assumptions such as the existence of public-key encryption and shallow pseudorandom generators), we can support hierarchical structures of bounded depth and width.

Cite as

Zvika Brakerski, Nishanth Chandran, Vipul Goyal, Aayush Jain, Amit Sahai, and Gil Segev. Hierarchical Functional Encryption. In 8th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2017). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 67, pp. 8:1-8:27, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


Copy BibTex To Clipboard

@InProceedings{brakerski_et_al:LIPIcs.ITCS.2017.8,
  author =	{Brakerski, Zvika and Chandran, Nishanth and Goyal, Vipul and Jain, Aayush and Sahai, Amit and Segev, Gil},
  title =	{{Hierarchical Functional Encryption}},
  booktitle =	{8th Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science Conference (ITCS 2017)},
  pages =	{8:1--8:27},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-029-3},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{67},
  editor =	{Papadimitriou, Christos H.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2017.8},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-81992},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.ITCS.2017.8},
  annote =	{Keywords: Functional Encryption, Delegatable Encryption, Cryptography}
}
Questions / Remarks / Feedback
X

Feedback for Dagstuhl Publishing


Thanks for your feedback!

Feedback submitted

Could not send message

Please try again later or send an E-mail