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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 5, Issue 9



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Complete Issue
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 5, Issue 9, September 2015, Complete Issue

Abstract
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 5, Issue 9, September 2015, Complete Issue

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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 5, Issue 9, September 2015, Complete Issue. In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 5, Issue 9, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2016)


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@Article{DagRep.5.9,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 5, Issue 9, September 2015, Complete Issue}},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2016},
  volume =	{5},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.5.9},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-56957},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.5.9},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 5, Issue 9, September 2015, Complete Issue}
}
Document
Front Matter
Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 5, Issue 9, 2015

Abstract
Table of Contents, Frontmatter

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Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 5, Issue 9, 2015. In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 5, Issue 9, pp. i-ii, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2016)


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@Article{DagRep.5.9.i,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 5, Issue 9, 2015}},
  pages =	{i--ii},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2016},
  volume =	{5},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.5.9.i},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-56941},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.5.9.i},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 5, Issue 9, 2015}
}
Document
Quantum Cryptanalysis (Dagstuhl Seminar 15371)

Authors: Michele Mosca, Martin Roetteler, Nicolas Sendrier, and Rainer Steinwandt


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 15371 "Quantum Cryptanalysis". In this seminar, participants explored the impact that quantum algorithms will have on cryptology once a large-scale quantum computer becomes available. Research highlights in this seminar included both computational resource requirement and availability estimates for meaningful quantum cryptanalytic attacks against conventional cryptography, as well as the security of proposed quantum-safe cryptosystems against emerging quantum cryptanalytic attacks.

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Michele Mosca, Martin Roetteler, Nicolas Sendrier, and Rainer Steinwandt. Quantum Cryptanalysis (Dagstuhl Seminar 15371). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 5, Issue 9, pp. 1-17, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2016)


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@Article{mosca_et_al:DagRep.5.9.1,
  author =	{Mosca, Michele and Roetteler, Martin and Sendrier, Nicolas and Steinwandt, Rainer},
  title =	{{Quantum Cryptanalysis (Dagstuhl Seminar 15371)}},
  pages =	{1--17},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2016},
  volume =	{5},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{Mosca, Michele and Roetteler, Martin and Sendrier, Nicolas and Steinwandt, Rainer},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.5.9.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-56825},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.5.9.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: Cryptography, Quantum computing, Post-quantum cryptography, Quantum algorithms, Cryptanalysis, Computational algebra, Quantum circuit complexity, Quantum hardware and resource estimation}
}
Document
Information from Deduction: Models and Proofs (Dagstuhl Seminar 15381)

Authors: Nikolaj S. Bjorner, Jasmin Christian Blanchette, Viorica Sofronie-Stokkermans, and Christoph Weidenbach


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 15381 "Information from Deduction: Models and Proofs". The aim of the seminar was to bring together researchers working in deduction and applications that rely on models and proofs produced by deduction tools. Proofs and models serve two main purposes: (1) as an upcoming paradigm towards the next generation of automated deduction tools where search relies on (partial) proofs and models; (2) as the actual result of an automated deduction tool, which is increasingly integrated into application tools. Applications are rarely well served by a simple yes/no answer from a deduction tool. Many use models as certificates for satisfiability to extract feasible program executions; others use proof objects as certificates for unsatisfiability in the context of high-integrity systems development. Models and proofs even play an integral role within deductive tools as major methods for efficient proof search rely on refining a simultaneous search for a model or a proof. The topic is in a sense evergreen: models and proofs will always be an integral part of deduction. Nonetheless, the seminar was especially timely given recent activities in deduction and applications, and it enabled researchers from different subcommunities to communicate with each other towards exploiting synergies.

Cite as

Nikolaj S. Bjorner, Jasmin Christian Blanchette, Viorica Sofronie-Stokkermans, and Christoph Weidenbach. Information from Deduction: Models and Proofs (Dagstuhl Seminar 15381). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 5, Issue 9, pp. 18-37, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2016)


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@Article{bjorner_et_al:DagRep.5.9.18,
  author =	{Bjorner, Nikolaj S. and Blanchette, Jasmin Christian and Sofronie-Stokkermans, Viorica and Weidenbach, Christoph},
  title =	{{Information from Deduction: Models and Proofs (Dagstuhl Seminar 15381)}},
  pages =	{18--37},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2016},
  volume =	{5},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{Bjorner, Nikolaj S. and Blanchette, Jasmin Christian and Sofronie-Stokkermans, Viorica and Weidenbach, Christoph},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.5.9.18},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-56830},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.5.9.18},
  annote =	{Keywords: Automated Deduction, Program Verification, Certification}
}
Document
Modeling and Simulation of Sport Games, Sport Movements, and Adaptations to Training (Dagstuhl Seminar 15382)

Authors: Ricardo Duarte, Björn Eskofier, Martin Rumpf, and Josef Wiemeyer


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 15382 "Modeling and Simulation of Sport Games, Sport Movements, and Adaptations to Training". The primary goal of the seminar was the continuation of the interdisciplinary and transdisciplinarity research in sports and computer science with the emphasis on modeling and simulation technologies. In this seminar, experts on modeling and simulation from computer science, sport science, and industry were invited to discuss recent developments, problems and future tasks in these fields. For instance, computational models are applied in motor control and learning, biomechanics, game analysis, training science, sport psychology, and sport sociology. However, for these models to be adequate, accurate and fully utilized to their potential, major inputs from both computer and sports scientists are required. To bridge the potential disconnect between the skill sets of both sets of experts, the major challenge is to equip both computer and sports scientists with a common language and skill sets where both parties can communicate effectively. The seminar focused on three application areas: sport games, sport movements, and adaptations to training. In conclusion, the seminar showed that the different application areas face closely related problems. The disciplines could mutually benefit from each other combing the knowledge of domain experts in e.g. computer vision, biomechanics, and match theory.

Cite as

Ricardo Duarte, Björn Eskofier, Martin Rumpf, and Josef Wiemeyer. Modeling and Simulation of Sport Games, Sport Movements, and Adaptations to Training (Dagstuhl Seminar 15382). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 5, Issue 9, pp. 38-56, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2016)


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@Article{duarte_et_al:DagRep.5.9.38,
  author =	{Duarte, Ricardo and Eskofier, Bj\"{o}rn and Rumpf, Martin and Wiemeyer, Josef},
  title =	{{Modeling and Simulation of Sport Games, Sport Movements, and Adaptations to Training (Dagstuhl Seminar 15382)}},
  pages =	{38--56},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2016},
  volume =	{5},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{Duarte, Ricardo and Eskofier, Bj\"{o}rn and Rumpf, Martin and Wiemeyer, Josef},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.5.9.38},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-56844},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.5.9.38},
  annote =	{Keywords: Modeling, Simulation, Machine Learning, Sports Science, Biomechanics, Sport Games, Training Adaptation}
}
Document
Algorithms and Complexity for Continuous Problems (Dagstuhl Seminar 15391)

Authors: Aicke Hinrichs, Joseph F. Traub, Henryk Wozniakowski, and Larisa Yaroslavtseva


Abstract
From 20.09.15 to 25.09.15, the Dagstuhl Seminar 15391 Algorithms and Complexity for Continuous Problems was held in the International Conference and Research Center (IBFI), Schloss Dagstuhl. During the seminar, participants presented their current research, and ongoing work and open problems were discussed. Abstracts or the presentations given during the seminar can be found in this report. The first section describes the seminar topics and goals in general. Links to extended abstracts or full papers are provided, if available.

Cite as

Aicke Hinrichs, Joseph F. Traub, Henryk Wozniakowski, and Larisa Yaroslavtseva. Algorithms and Complexity for Continuous Problems (Dagstuhl Seminar 15391). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 5, Issue 9, pp. 57-76, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2016)


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@Article{hinrichs_et_al:DagRep.5.9.57,
  author =	{Hinrichs, Aicke and Traub, Joseph F. and Wozniakowski, Henryk and Yaroslavtseva, Larisa},
  title =	{{Algorithms and Complexity for Continuous Problems (Dagstuhl Seminar 15391)}},
  pages =	{57--76},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2016},
  volume =	{5},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{Hinrichs, Aicke and Traub, Joseph F. and Wozniakowski, Henryk and Yaroslavtseva, Larisa},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.5.9.57},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-56854},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.5.9.57},
  annote =	{Keywords: High Dimensional Problems, Tractability, Random coefficients, Multilevel algorithms, computational stochastic processes, Compressed sensing, Learning theory}
}
Document
Measuring the Complexity of Computational Content (Dagstuhl Seminar 15392)

Authors: Vasco Brattka, Akitoshi Kawamura, Alberto Marcone, and Arno Pauly


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 15392 "Measuring the Complexity of Computational Content: Weihrauch Reducibility and Reverse Analysis." It includes abstracts on most talks presented during the seminar, a list of open problems that were discussed and partially solved during the meeting as well as a bibliography on the seminar topic that we compiled during the seminar.

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Vasco Brattka, Akitoshi Kawamura, Alberto Marcone, and Arno Pauly. Measuring the Complexity of Computational Content (Dagstuhl Seminar 15392). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 5, Issue 9, pp. 77-104, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2016)


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@Article{brattka_et_al:DagRep.5.9.77,
  author =	{Brattka, Vasco and Kawamura, Akitoshi and Marcone, Alberto and Pauly, Arno},
  title =	{{Measuring the Complexity of Computational Content (Dagstuhl Seminar 15392)}},
  pages =	{77--104},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2016},
  volume =	{5},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{Brattka, Vasco and Kawamura, Akitoshi and Marcone, Alberto and Pauly, Arno},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.5.9.77},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-56861},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.5.9.77},
  annote =	{Keywords: Computability and complexity in analysis, computations on real numbers, reducibilities, descriptive complexity, computational complexity, reverse and constructive mathematics}
}
Document
Circuits, Logic and Games (Dagstuhl Seminar 15401)

Authors: Mikolaj Bojanczyk, Meena Mahajan, Thomas Schwentick, and Heribert Vollmer


Abstract
Over the years, there has been a lot of interplay between circuit complexity and logic. There are tight connections between small-depth circuit classes and fragments and extensions of firstorder logic, and ideas from games and finite model theory have provided powerful lower bound techniques for circuits. In recent years, there has been an impressive and sustained growth of interest and activity in the intersection of finite model theory and Boolean circuit complexity. The central aim of the seminar was to bring together researchers from these two areas to further strengthen the mutual fertilisation. The seminar focussed on the following specific topics: -The algebraic approach to circuit complexity with its applications to finite model theory -The logic-circuit connection, with a particular emphasis on circuit lower bounds that trigger results in finite model theory like separations between logics - New connections between uniformity conditions on circuit families and logical predicates - Structural complexity and circuit lower bounds inherently using methods from logic and algebra Proof systems with low circuit complexity - Dynamic complexity: understanding the dynamic expressive power of small depth circuit classes The seminar had 43 participants from 11 countries and was very successful with respect to the exchange of recent results, ideas and methodological approaches.

Cite as

Mikolaj Bojanczyk, Meena Mahajan, Thomas Schwentick, and Heribert Vollmer. Circuits, Logic and Games (Dagstuhl Seminar 15401). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 5, Issue 9, pp. 105-124, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2016)


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@Article{bojanczyk_et_al:DagRep.5.9.105,
  author =	{Bojanczyk, Mikolaj and Mahajan, Meena and Schwentick, Thomas and Vollmer, Heribert},
  title =	{{Circuits, Logic and Games (Dagstuhl Seminar 15401)}},
  pages =	{105--124},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2016},
  volume =	{5},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{Bojanczyk, Mikolaj and Mahajan, Meena and Schwentick, Thomas and Vollmer, Heribert},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.5.9.105},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-56872},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.5.9.105},
  annote =	{Keywords: computational complexity theory, finite model theory, Boolean circuits, regular languages, finite monoids, Ehrenfeucht-Fraiss\'{e}-games}
}
Document
Self-assembly and Self-organization in Computer Science and Biology (Dagstuhl Seminar 15402)

Authors: Vincent Danos and Heinz Koeppl


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 15402 "Self-assembly and Self-organization in Computer Science and Biology". With the trend of technological systems to become more distributed they tend to resemble closer biological systems. Biological systems on all scale are distributed and most often operate without central coordination. Taking the morphogenesis as an example, it is clear that the complexity and precision of distributed mechanisms in biology supersedes our current design attempts to distributed systems. The seminar assembled together researchers from computer science, engineering, physics and molecular biology working on the problem of decentralized coordination of distributed systems. Within every domain different terms have been coined, different analysis methods have been developed and applied and the seminar aims to foster the exchange of methods and the instantiation and alignment of important problem statements that can span across the disciplines. A representative example for a problem that is studied across domains through different methods is self-assembly. For example, computer scientists consider abstract self-assembly models such as Wang tiles to bound shape complexities while polymer physicists and biologists use molecular dynamics simulations to characterize self-assembly by means of energy and entropy. Because of its well-definedness, we deliberately placed emphasis on self-assembly that is otherwise entailed in the more general term self-organization. Within the domain of self-organization various research threads were represented at the seminar and a certain convergence of underlying concepts was possible. The seminar helped to exchange techniques from different domains and to agree on certain problem statements for future collaborations.

Cite as

Vincent Danos and Heinz Koeppl. Self-assembly and Self-organization in Computer Science and Biology (Dagstuhl Seminar 15402). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 5, Issue 9, pp. 125-138, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2016)


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@Article{danos_et_al:DagRep.5.9.125,
  author =	{Danos, Vincent and Koeppl, Heinz},
  title =	{{Self-assembly and Self-organization in Computer Science and Biology (Dagstuhl Seminar 15402)}},
  pages =	{125--138},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2016},
  volume =	{5},
  number =	{9},
  editor =	{Danos, Vincent and Koeppl, Heinz},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.5.9.125},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-56887},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.5.9.125},
  annote =	{Keywords: Self-assembly, molecular modeling, molecular dynamics, graph-rewriting grammars, self-organization, self-* systems, concurrency}
}

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