Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1

Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts



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Publication Details

  • published at: 2010-08-02
  • Publisher: Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik
  • ISBN: 978-3-939897-19-4
  • DBLP: db/conf/dagstuhl/P10004

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Document
Complete Volume
DFU, Volume 1, Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts, Complete Volume

Authors: Hans Hagen


Abstract
DFU, Volume 1, Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts, Complete Volume

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Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2012)


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@Collection{DFU.SciViz.2010,
  title =	{{DFU, Volume 1, Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts, Complete Volume}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2012},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-36002},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010},
  annote =	{Keywords: Computer Graphics, Image Processing and Computer Vision, Physical Sciences and Engineering, Life and Medical Sciences}
}
Document
Frontmatter, Table of Contents, Preface

Authors: Hans Hagen


Abstract
Frontmatter. Table of contents. Preface.

Cite as

Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 0:i-0:x, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{hagen:DFU.SciViz.2010.I,
  author =	{Hagen, Hans},
  title =	{{Frontmatter, Table of Contents, Preface}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{0:i--0:x},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.I},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-26928},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.I},
  annote =	{Keywords: Frontmatter, Table of Contents, Preface}
}
Document
Generalized Hyper-cylinders: a Mechanism for Modeling and Visualizing N-D Objects

Authors: Matthew O. Ward and Zhenyu Guo


Abstract
The display of surfaces and solids has usually been restricted to the domain of scientific visualization; however, little work has been done on the visualization of surfaces and solids of dimensionality higher than three or four. Indeed, most high-dimensional visualization focuses on the display of data points. However, the ability to effectively model and visualize higher dimensional objects such as clusters and patterns would be quite useful in studying their shapes, relationships, and changes over time. In this paper we describe a method for the description, extraction, and visualization of N-dimensional surfaces and solids. The approach is to extend generalized cylinders, an object representation used in geometric modeling and computer vision, to arbitrary dimensionality, resulting in what we term Generalized Hyper-cylinders (GHCs). A basic GHC consists of two N-dimensional hyper-spheres connected by a hyper-cylinder whose shape at any point along the cylinder is determined by interpolating between the endpoint shapes. More complex GHCs involve alternate cross-section shapes and curved spines connecting the ends. Several algorithms for constructing or extracting GHCs from multivariate data sets are proposed. Once extracted, the GHCs can be visualized using a variety of projection techniques and methods toconvey cross-section shapes.

Cite as

Matthew O. Ward and Zhenyu Guo. Generalized Hyper-cylinders: a Mechanism for Modeling and Visualizing N-D Objects. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 1-10, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{ward_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.1,
  author =	{Ward, Matthew O. and Guo, Zhenyu},
  title =	{{Generalized Hyper-cylinders: a Mechanism for Modeling and Visualizing N-D Objects}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{1--10},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-26937},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: N-Dimensional Visualization, Cluster Visualization}
}
Document
Computing an Optimal Layout for Cone Trees

Authors: Dirk Zeckzer, Fang Chen, and Hans Hagen


Abstract
Many visual representations for trees have been developed in information and software visualization. One of them are cone trees, a well-known three-dimensional representation for trees. This paper is based on an approach for constructing cone trees bottom-up. For this approach, an optimal layout for these trees is given together with a proof that based on the assumptions, there can be no better layouts. This comprises special cases, an optimal constant for the general case, and a post-processing step improving the layout.

Cite as

Dirk Zeckzer, Fang Chen, and Hans Hagen. Computing an Optimal Layout for Cone Trees. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 11-29, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{zeckzer_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.11,
  author =	{Zeckzer, Dirk and Chen, Fang and Hagen, Hans},
  title =	{{Computing an Optimal Layout for Cone Trees}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{11--29},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.11},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-26947},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.11},
  annote =	{Keywords: Cone Trees, Information Visualization, Tree Layout}
}
Document
Generalized Swap Operation for Tetrahedrizations

Authors: Burkhard Lehner, Bernd Hamann, and Georg Umlauf


Abstract
Mesh optimization of 2D and 3D triangulations is used in multiple applications extensively. For example, mesh optimization is crucial in the context of adaptively discretizing geometry, typically representing the geometrical boundary conditions of a numerical simulation, or adaptively discretizing the entire space over which various dependent variables of a numerical simulation must be approximated. Together with operations applied to the vertices the so-called edge or face swap operations are the building block of all optimization approaches. To speed up the optimization or to avoid local minima of the function measuring overall mesh quality these swaps are combined to generalized swap operations with a less local impact on the triangulation. Despite the fact that these swap operations change only the connectivity of a triangulation, it depends on the geometry of the triangulation whether the generalized swap will generate inconsistently oriented or degenerate simplices. Because these are undesirable for numerical reasons, this paper is concerned with geometric criteria that guarantee the generalized swaps for a 3D triangulation to yield only valid, non-degenerate triangulations.

Cite as

Burkhard Lehner, Bernd Hamann, and Georg Umlauf. Generalized Swap Operation for Tetrahedrizations. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 30-44, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{lehner_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.30,
  author =	{Lehner, Burkhard and Hamann, Bernd and Umlauf, Georg},
  title =	{{Generalized Swap Operation for Tetrahedrizations}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{30--44},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.30},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-26956},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.30},
  annote =	{Keywords: 3D Triangulation, Geometric Conditions, Swap Operations}
}
Document
On Curved Simplicial Elements and Best Quadratic Spline Approximation for Hierarchical Data Representation

Authors: Bernd Hamann


Abstract
We present a method for hierarchical data approximation using curved quadratic simplicial elements for domain decomposition. Scientific data defined over two- or three-dimensional domains typically contain boundaries and discontinuities that are to be preserved and approximated well for data analysis and visualization. Curved simplicial elements make possible a better representation of curved geometry, domain boundaries, and discontinuities than simplicial elements with non-curved edges and faces. We use quadratic basis functions and compute best quadratic simplicial spline approximations that are $C^0$-continuous everywhere except where field discontinuities occur whose locations we assume to be given. We adaptively refine a simplicial approximation by identifying and bisecting simplicial elements with largest errors. It is possible to store multiple approximation levels of increasing quality. Our method can be used for hierarchical data processing and visualization.

Cite as

Bernd Hamann. On Curved Simplicial Elements and Best Quadratic Spline Approximation for Hierarchical Data Representation. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 45-61, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{hamann:DFU.SciViz.2010.45,
  author =	{Hamann, Bernd},
  title =	{{On Curved Simplicial Elements and Best Quadratic Spline Approximation for Hierarchical Data Representation}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{45--61},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.45},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-26960},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.45},
  annote =	{Keywords: Approximation, Bisection, Grid Generation, Finite Elements, Hierarchical Approximation, Simplicial Decomposition, Spline}
}
Document
Towards Automatic Feature-based Visualization

Authors: Heike Jänicke and Gerik Scheuermann


Abstract
Visualizations are well suited to communicate large amounts of complex data. With increasing resolution in the spatial and temporal domain simple imaging techniques meet their limits, as it is quite difficult to display multiple variables in 3D or analyze long video sequences. Feature detection techniques reduce the data-set to the essential structures and allow for a highly abstracted representation of the data. However, current feature detection algorithms commonly rely on a detailed description of each individual feature. In this paper, we present a feature-based visualization technique that is solely based on the data. Using concepts from computational mechanics and information theory, a measure, local statistical complexity, is defined that extracts distinctive structures in the data-set. Local statistical complexity assigns each position in the (multivariate) data-set a scalar value indicating regions with extraordinary behavior. Local structures with high local statistical complexity form the features of the data-set. Volume-rendering and iso-surfacing are used to visualize the automatically extracted features of the data-set. To illustrate the ability of the technique, we use examples from diffusion, and flow simulations in two and three dimensions.

Cite as

Heike Jänicke and Gerik Scheuermann. Towards Automatic Feature-based Visualization. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 62-77, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{janicke_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.62,
  author =	{J\"{a}nicke, Heike and Scheuermann, Gerik},
  title =	{{Towards Automatic Feature-based Visualization}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{62--77},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.62},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-26976},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.62},
  annote =	{Keywords: Feature Detection Techniques, Feature-based Visualization, Local Statistical Complexity}
}
Document
CSG Operations of Arbitrary Primitives with Interval Arithmetic and Real-Time Ray Casting

Authors: Younis Hijazi, Aaron Knoll, Mathias Schott, Andrew Kensler, and Charles Hansen


Abstract
We apply Knoll et al.'s algorithm [Knoll et al., "Fast ray tracing of arbitrary implicit surfaces with interval and affine arithmetic.", Comput. Graph. Forum, 28(1):26–40, 2009] to interactively ray-cast constructive solid geometry (CSG) objects of arbitrary primitives represented as implicit functions. Whereas modeling globally with implicit surfaces suffers from a lack of control, implicits are well-suited for arbitrary primitives and can be combined through various operations. The conventional way to represent union and intersection with interval arithmetic (IA) is simply using min and max but other operations such as the product of two forms can be useful in modeling joints between multiple objects. Typical primitives are objects of simple shape, e.g. cubes, cylinders, spheres, etc. Our method handles arbitrary primitives, e.g. superquadrics or non-algebraic implicits. Subdivision and interval arithmetic guarantee robustness whereas GPU ray casting allows for fast and aesthetic rendering. Indeed, ray casting parallelizes efficiently and trivially and thus takes advantage of the continuous increasing computational power of hardware (CPUs and GPUs); moreover it lends itself to multi-bounce effects, such as shadows and transparency, which help for the visualization of complicated objects. With our system, we are able to render multi-material CSG trees of implicits robustly, in interactive time and with good visual quality.

Cite as

Younis Hijazi, Aaron Knoll, Mathias Schott, Andrew Kensler, and Charles Hansen. CSG Operations of Arbitrary Primitives with Interval Arithmetic and Real-Time Ray Casting. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 78-89, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{hijazi_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.78,
  author =	{Hijazi, Younis and Knoll, Aaron and Schott, Mathias and Kensler, Andrew and Hansen, Charles},
  title =	{{CSG Operations of Arbitrary Primitives with Interval Arithmetic and Real-Time Ray Casting}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{78--89},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.78},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-26986},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.78},
  annote =	{Keywords: Implicit Surface, Constructive Solid Geometry, Interval Arithmetic, Ray Casting}
}
Document
Exploring Visualization Methods for Complex Variables

Authors: Andrew J. Hanson and Ji-Ping Sha


Abstract
Applications of complex variables and related manifolds appear throughout mathematics and science. Here we review a family of basic methods for applying visualization concepts to the study of complex variables and the properties of specific complex manifolds. We begin with an outline of the methods we can employ to directly visualize poles and branch cuts as complex functions of one complex variable. $CP^2$ polynomial methods and their higher analogs can then be exploited to produce visualizations of Calabi-Yau spaces such as those modeling the hypothesized hidden dimensions of string theory. Finally, we show how the study of N-boson scattering in dual model/string theory leads to novel cross-ratio-space methods for the treatment of analysis in two or more complex variables.

Cite as

Andrew J. Hanson and Ji-Ping Sha. Exploring Visualization Methods for Complex Variables. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 90-109, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{hanson_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.90,
  author =	{Hanson, Andrew J. and Sha, Ji-Ping},
  title =	{{Exploring Visualization Methods for Complex Variables}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{90--109},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.90},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-26996},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.90},
  annote =	{Keywords: Visualization, Complex Manifolds, High Dimensions}
}
Document
Tensor Field Reconstruction Based on Eigenvector and Eigenvalue Interpolation

Authors: Ingrid Hotz, Jaya Sreevalsan-Nair, Hans Hagen, and Bernd Hamann


Abstract
Interpolation is an essential step in the visualization process. While most data from simulations or experiments are discrete many visualization methods are based on smooth, continuous data approximation or interpolation methods. We introduce a new interpolation method for symmetrical tensor fields given on a triangulated domain. Differently from standard tensor field interpolation, which is based on the tensor components, we use tensor invariants, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, for the interpolation. This interpolation minimizes the number of eigenvectors and eigenvalues computations by restricting it to mesh vertices and makes an exact integration of the tensor lines possible. The tensor field topology is qualitatively the same as for the component wise-interpolation. Since the interpolation decouples the ``shape'' and ``direction'' interpolation it is shape-preserving, what is especially important for tracing fibers in diffusion MRI data.

Cite as

Ingrid Hotz, Jaya Sreevalsan-Nair, Hans Hagen, and Bernd Hamann. Tensor Field Reconstruction Based on Eigenvector and Eigenvalue Interpolation. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 110-123, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{hotz_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.110,
  author =	{Hotz, Ingrid and Sreevalsan-Nair, Jaya and Hagen, Hans and Hamann, Bernd},
  title =	{{Tensor Field Reconstruction Based on Eigenvector and Eigenvalue Interpolation}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{110--123},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.110},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-27003},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.110},
  annote =	{Keywords: Tensor Field, Eigenvector, Eigenvalue, Interpolation}
}
Document
Tracking Lines in Higher Order Tensor Fields

Authors: Mario Hlawitschka and Gerik Scheuermann


Abstract
While tensors occur in many areas of science and engineering, little has been done to visualize tensors with order higher than two. Tensors of higher orders can be used for example to describe complex diffusion patterns in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently, we presented a method for tracking lines in higher order tensor fields that is a generalization of methods known from first order tensor fields (vector fields) and symmetric second order tensor fields. Here, this method is applied to magnetic resonance imaging where tensor fields are used to describe diffusion patterns for example of hydrogen in the human brain. These patterns align to the internal structure and can be used to analyze interconnections between different areas of the brain, the so called tractography problem. The advantage of using higher order tensor lines is the ability to detect crossings locally, which is not possible in second order tensor fields. In this paper, the theoretical details will be extended and tangible results will be given on MRI data sets.

Cite as

Mario Hlawitschka and Gerik Scheuermann. Tracking Lines in Higher Order Tensor Fields. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 124-135, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{hlawitschka_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.124,
  author =	{Hlawitschka, Mario and Scheuermann, Gerik},
  title =	{{Tracking Lines in Higher Order Tensor Fields}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{124--135},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.124},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-27013},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.124},
  annote =	{Keywords: Tensor Field, Line Tracking}
}
Document
Illustrative Focus+Context Approaches in Interactive Volume Visualization

Authors: Stefan Bruckner, M. Eduard Gröller, Klaus Mueller, Bernhard Preim, and Deborah Silver


Abstract
Illustrative techniques are a new and exciting direction in visualization research. Traditional techniques which have been used by scientific illustrators for centuries are re-examined under the light of modern computer technology. In this paper, we discuss the use of the focus+context concept for the illustrative visualization of volumetric data. We give an overview of the state-of-the-art and discuss recent approaches which employ this concept in novel ways.

Cite as

Stefan Bruckner, M. Eduard Gröller, Klaus Mueller, Bernhard Preim, and Deborah Silver. Illustrative Focus+Context Approaches in Interactive Volume Visualization. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 136-162, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{bruckner_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.136,
  author =	{Bruckner, Stefan and Gr\"{o}ller, M. Eduard and Mueller, Klaus and Preim, Bernhard and Silver, Deborah},
  title =	{{Illustrative Focus+Context Approaches in Interactive Volume Visualization}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{136--162},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.136},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-27023},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.136},
  annote =	{Keywords: Illustrative Visualization, Volumetric Data}
}
Document
Model-Based Visualization for Intervention Planning

Authors: Bernhard Preim


Abstract
Computer support for intervention planning is often a two-stage process: In a first stage, the relevant segmentation target structures are identified and delineated. In a second stage, image analysis results are employed for the actual planning process. In the first stage, model-based segmentation techniques are often used to reduce the interaction effort and increase the reproducibility. There is a similar argument to employ model-based techniques for the visualization as well. With increasingly more visualization options, users have many parameters to adjust in order to generate expressive visualizations. Surface models may be smoothed with a variety of techniques and parameters. Surface visualization and illustrative rendering techniques are controlled by a large set of additional parameters. Although interactive 3d visualizations should be flexible and support individual planning tasks, appropriate selection of visualization techniques and presets for their parameters is needed. In this chapter, we discuss this kind of visualization support. We refer to model-based visualization to denote the selection and parameterization of visualization techniques based on 'a priori knowledge concerning visual perception, shapes of anatomical objects and intervention planning tasks.

Cite as

Bernhard Preim. Model-Based Visualization for Intervention Planning. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 163-178, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{preim:DFU.SciViz.2010.163,
  author =	{Preim, Bernhard},
  title =	{{Model-Based Visualization for Intervention Planning}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{163--178},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.163},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-27033},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.163},
  annote =	{Keywords: Model-based Visualization, Surface Visualization, Illustrative Rendering}
}
Document
Pre-operative Planning and Intra-operative Guidance for Shoulder Replacement Surgery

Authors: Charl P. Botha, Peter R. Krekel, Edward R. Valstar, Paul W. de Bruin, and P.M. Rozing


Abstract
Shoulder joint replacement, or arthroplasty, is indicated in cases where arthritis or trauma has resulted in severe joint damage that in turn causes increased pain and decreased function. However, shoulder arthroplasty is less successful than hip and knee replacement, mostly due to the complexity of the shoulder joint and the resultant complexity of the replacement operation. In this paper we present a complete visualization-oriented pre-operative planning and intra-operative guidance approach for shoulder joint replacement. Our system assists the surgeon by allowing a virtual arthroplasty procedure whilst giving feedback, primarily via patient- and procedure-specific joint range of motion (ROM) simulation and visualization. After a successful planning, our system automatically generates a 3D model of a patient-specific mechanical guidance device that is then produced by a rapid prototyping machine and can be used during the operation. In this way, a computer-based guidance system is not required in the operating room.

Cite as

Charl P. Botha, Peter R. Krekel, Edward R. Valstar, Paul W. de Bruin, and P.M. Rozing. Pre-operative Planning and Intra-operative Guidance for Shoulder Replacement Surgery. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 179-195, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{botha_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.179,
  author =	{Botha, Charl P. and Krekel, Peter R. and Valstar, Edward R. and de Bruin, Paul W. and Rozing, P.M.},
  title =	{{Pre-operative Planning and Intra-operative Guidance for Shoulder Replacement Surgery}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{179--195},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.179},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-27049},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.179},
  annote =	{Keywords: Surgery Assistance}
}
Document
Patient-Specific Mappings between Myocardial and Coronary Anatomy

Authors: Maurice Termeer, Javier Oliván Bescós, Marcel Breeuwer, Anna Vilanova, and Frans Gerritsen


Abstract
The segmentation of the myocardium based on the 17-segment model as recommended by the American Heart Association is widely used in medical practice. The patient-specific coronary anatomy does not play a role in this model. Due to large variations in coronary anatomy among patients, this can result in an inaccurate mapping between myocardial segments and coronary arteries. We present two approaches to include the patient-specific coronary anatomy in this mapping. The first approach adapts the 17-segment model to fit the patient. The second approach generates a less constrained mapping that does not necessarily conform to this model. Both approaches are based on a Voronoi diagram computation of the primary coronary arteries using geodesic distances along the epicardium in three-dimensional space. We demonstrate both our approaches with several patients and show how our first approach can also be used to fit volume data to the 17-segment model. Our technique gives detailed insight into the coronary anatomy in a single diagram. Based on the feedback provided by clinical experts we conclude that it has the potential to provide a more accurate relation between deficiencies in the myocardium and the supplying coronary arteries.

Cite as

Maurice Termeer, Javier Oliván Bescós, Marcel Breeuwer, Anna Vilanova, and Frans Gerritsen. Patient-Specific Mappings between Myocardial and Coronary Anatomy. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 196-209, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{termeer_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.196,
  author =	{Termeer, Maurice and Besc\'{o}s, Javier Oliv\'{a}n and Breeuwer, Marcel and Vilanova, Anna and Gerritsen, Frans},
  title =	{{Patient-Specific Mappings between Myocardial and Coronary Anatomy}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{196--209},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.196},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-27053},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.196},
  annote =	{Keywords: Voronoi Diagram, Segmentation, Myocardium}
}
Document
Modeling and Visualization of Cardiovascular Systems

Authors: Thomas Wischgoll


Abstract
Modeling complex organs, such as the human heart, requires a detailed understanding of the geometric and mechanical properties of that organ. Similarly, the model is only as accurate as the precision of the underlying properties allow. Hence, it is of great importance that accurate measurements of the geometric configuration are available. This paper describes the different steps that are necessary for creating and visualizing such a vascular model, ranging from determining a basic geometric model, gathering statistical data necessary to extend an existing model up to the visualization of the resulting large-scale vascular models.

Cite as

Thomas Wischgoll. Modeling and Visualization of Cardiovascular Systems. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 210-226, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{wischgoll:DFU.SciViz.2010.210,
  author =	{Wischgoll, Thomas},
  title =	{{Modeling and Visualization of Cardiovascular Systems}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{210--226},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.210},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-27061},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.210},
  annote =	{Keywords: Volumetric Data, Curve-skeleton, Cardiovascular Structure}
}
Document
From Visualization to Visually Enabled Reasoning

Authors: Joerg Meyer, Jim Thomas, Stephan Diehl, Brian Fisher, and Daniel A. Keim


Abstract
Interactive Visualization has been used to study scientific phenomena, analyze data, visualize information, and to explore large amounts of multi-variate data. It enables the human mind to gain novel insights by empowering the human visual system, encompassing the brain and the eyes, to discover properties that were previously unknown. While it is believed that the process of creating interactive visualizations is reasonably well understood, the process of stimulating and enabling human reasoning with the aid of interactive visualization tools is still a highly unexplored field. We hypothesize that visualizations make an impact if they successfully influence a thought process or a decision. Interacting with visualizations is part of this process. We present exemplary cases where visualization was successful in enabling human reasoning, and instances where the interaction with data helped in understanding the data and making a better informed decision. We suggest metrics that help in understanding the evolution of a decision making process. Such a metric would measure the efficiency of the reasoning process, rather than the performance of the visualization system or the user. We claim that the methodology of interactive visualization, which has been studied to a great extent, is now sufficiently mature, and we would like to provide some guidance regarding the evaluation of knowledge gain through visually enabled reasoning. It is our ambition to encourage the reader to take on the next step and move from information visualization to visually enabled reasoning.

Cite as

Joerg Meyer, Jim Thomas, Stephan Diehl, Brian Fisher, and Daniel A. Keim. From Visualization to Visually Enabled Reasoning. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 227-245, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{meyer_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.227,
  author =	{Meyer, Joerg and Thomas, Jim and Diehl, Stephan and Fisher, Brian and Keim, Daniel A.},
  title =	{{From Visualization to Visually Enabled Reasoning}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{227--245},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.227},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-27078},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.227},
  annote =	{Keywords: Interactive Visualization, Reasoning}
}
Document
Visual Simulation of Flow

Authors: Arie Kaufman and Ye Zhao


Abstract
We have adopted a numerical method from computational fluid dynamics, the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), for real-time simulation and visualization of flow and amorphous phenomena, such as clouds, smoke, fire, haze, dust, radioactive plumes, and air-borne biological or chemical agents. Unlike other approaches, LBM discretizes the micro-physics of local interactions and can handle very complex boundary conditions, such as deep urban canyons, curved walls, indoors, and dynamic boundaries of moving objects. Due to its discrete nature, LBM lends itself to multi-resolution approaches, and its computational pattern, which is similar to cellular automata, is easily parallelizable. We have accelerated LBM on commodity graphics processing units (GPUs), achieving real-time or even accelerated real-time on a single GPU or on a GPU cluster. We have implemented a 3D urban navigation system and applied it in New York City with real-time live sensor data. In addition to a pivotal application in simulation of airborne contaminants in urban environments, this approach will enable the development of other superior prediction simulation capabilities, computer graphics and games, and a novel technology for computational science and engineering.

Cite as

Arie Kaufman and Ye Zhao. Visual Simulation of Flow. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 246-258, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{kaufman_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.246,
  author =	{Kaufman, Arie and Zhao, Ye},
  title =	{{Visual Simulation of Flow}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{246--258},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.246},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-27080},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.246},
  annote =	{Keywords: Lattice Boltzmann Method, Amorphous phenomena, GPU Acceleration, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Urban Security}
}
Document
Local and Global Illumination in the Volume Rendering Integral

Authors: Nelson Max and Min Chen


Abstract
This article is intended as an update of the major survey by Max [Max, "Optical models for direct volume rendering.", IEEE Trans. on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 1(2):99–108, 1995] on optical models for direct volume rendering. It provides a brief overview of the subject scope covered by [Max, "Optical models for direct volume rendering.", IEEE Trans. on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 1(2):99–108, 1995], and brings recent developments, such as new shadow algorithms and refraction rendering, into the perspective. In particular, we examine three fundamentals aspects of direct volume rendering, namely the volume rendering integral, local illumination models and global illumination models, in a wavelength-independent manner. We review the developments on spectral volume rendering, in which visible light are considered as a form of electromagnetic radiation, optical models are implemented in conjunction with representations of spectral power distribution. This survey can provide a basis for, and encourage, new efforts for developing and using complex illumination models to achieve better realism and perception through optical correctness.

Cite as

Nelson Max and Min Chen. Local and Global Illumination in the Volume Rendering Integral. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 259-274, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{max_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.259,
  author =	{Max, Nelson and Chen, Min},
  title =	{{Local and Global Illumination in the Volume Rendering Integral}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{259--274},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.259},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-27090},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.259},
  annote =	{Keywords: Volume Rendering, Illumination Model}
}
Document
Real-time Terrain Mapping

Authors: Tony Bernardin, Eric Cowgil, Ryan Gold, Bernd Hamann, and Oliver Kreylos


Abstract
We present an interactive, real-time mapping system for digital elevation maps (DEMs), which allows Earth scientists to map and therefore understand the deformation of the continental crust at length scales of 10m to 1000km. Our system visualizes the surface of the Earth as a 3D~surface generated from a DEM, with a color texture generated from a registered multispectral image and vector-based mapping elements draped over it. We use a quadtree-based multiresolution method to be able to render high-resolution terrain mapping data sets of large spatial regions in real time. The main strength of our system is the combination of interactive rendering and interactive mapping directly onto the 3D~surface, with the ability to navigate the terrain and to change viewpoints arbitrarily during mapping. User studies and comparisons with commercially available mapping software show that our system improves mapping accuracy and efficiency, and also enables qualitatively different observations that are not possible to make with existing systems.

Cite as

Tony Bernardin, Eric Cowgil, Ryan Gold, Bernd Hamann, and Oliver Kreylos. Real-time Terrain Mapping. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 275-288, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{bernardin_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.275,
  author =	{Bernardin, Tony and Cowgil, Eric and Gold, Ryan and Hamann, Bernd and Kreylos, Oliver},
  title =	{{Real-time Terrain Mapping}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{275--288},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.275},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-27106},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.275},
  annote =	{Keywords: Earth, Space, and Environmental Sciences Visualization, Interaction, Terrain Visualization, Multiresolution Visualization}
}
Document
A Survey of Visualization Methods for Special Relativity

Authors: Daniel Weiskopf


Abstract
This paper provides a survey of approaches for special relativistic visualization. Visualization techniques are classified into three categories: Minkowski spacetime diagrams, depictions of spatial slices at a constant time, and virtual camera methods that simulate image generation in a relativistic scenario. The paper covers the historical outline from early hand-drawn visualizations to state-of-the-art computer-based visualization methods. This paper also provides a concise presentation of the mathematics of special relativity, making use of the geometric nature of spacetime and relating it to geometric concepts such vectors and linear transformations.

Cite as

Daniel Weiskopf. A Survey of Visualization Methods for Special Relativity. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 289-302, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{weiskopf:DFU.SciViz.2010.289,
  author =	{Weiskopf, Daniel},
  title =	{{A Survey of Visualization Methods for Special Relativity}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{289--302},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.289},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-27115},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.289},
  annote =	{Keywords: Special Relativity, Minkowski, Spacetime, Virtual Camera}
}
Document
Audio-visual Virtual Reality System for Room Acoustics

Authors: Eduard Deines, Martin Hering-Bertram, Jan Mohring, Jevgenijs Jegorovs, and Hans Hagen


Abstract
We present an audio-visual Virtual Reality display system for simulated sound fields. In addition to the room acoustic simulation by means of phonon tracing and finite element method this system includes the stereoscopic visualization of simulation results using a 3D back projection system as well as auralization by use of a professional sound equipment. For auralization purposes we develop a sound field synthesis approach for accurate control of the loudspeaker system.

Cite as

Eduard Deines, Martin Hering-Bertram, Jan Mohring, Jevgenijs Jegorovs, and Hans Hagen. Audio-visual Virtual Reality System for Room Acoustics. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 303-320, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{deines_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.303,
  author =	{Deines, Eduard and Hering-Bertram, Martin and Mohring, Jan and Jegorovs, Jevgenijs and Hagen, Hans},
  title =	{{Audio-visual Virtual Reality System for Room Acoustics}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{303--320},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.303},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-27128},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.303},
  annote =	{Keywords: Special Relativity, Minkowski, Spacetime, Virtual Camera}
}
Document
Saliency Guided Summarization of Molecular Dynamics Simulations

Authors: Robert Patro, Cheuk Yiu Ip, and Amitabh Varshney


Abstract
We present a novel method to measure saliency in molecular dynamics simulation data. This saliency measure is based on a multiscale center-surround mechanism, which is fast and efficient to compute. We explore the use of the saliency function to guide the selection of representative and anomalous timesteps for summarization of simulations. To this end, we also introduce a multiscale keyframe selection procedure which automatically provides keyframes representing the simulation at varying levels of coarseness. We compare our saliency guided keyframe approach against other methods, and show that it consistently selects superior keyframes as measured by their predictive power in reconstructing the simulation.

Cite as

Robert Patro, Cheuk Yiu Ip, and Amitabh Varshney. Saliency Guided Summarization of Molecular Dynamics Simulations. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 321-335, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{patro_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.321,
  author =	{Patro, Robert and Ip, Cheuk Yiu and Varshney, Amitabh},
  title =	{{Saliency Guided Summarization of Molecular Dynamics Simulations}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{321--335},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.321},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-27134},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.321},
  annote =	{Keywords: Molecuar Dynamics, Saliency, Simulation}
}
Document
Streaming Aerial Video Textures

Authors: Christopher S. Co, Mark A. Duchaineau, and Kenneth I. Joy


Abstract
We present a streaming compression algorithm for huge time-varying aerial imagery. New airborne optical sensors are capable of collecting billion-pixel images at multiple frames per second. These images must be transmitted through a low-bandwidth pipe requiring aggressive compression techniques. We achieve such compression by treating foreground portions of the imagery separately from background portions. Foreground information consists of moving objects, which form a tiny fraction of the total pixels. Background areas are compressed effectively over time using streaming wavelet analysis to compute a compact video texture map that represents several frames of raw input images. This map can be rendered efficiently using an algorithm amenable to GPU implementation. The core algorithmic contributions of this work are methods for fast, low-memory streaming wavelet compression and efficient display of wavelet video textures resulting from such compression.

Cite as

Christopher S. Co, Mark A. Duchaineau, and Kenneth I. Joy. Streaming Aerial Video Textures. In Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 1, pp. 336-345, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2010)


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@InCollection{co_et_al:DFU.SciViz.2010.336,
  author =	{Co, Christopher S. and Duchaineau, Mark A. and Joy, Kenneth I.},
  title =	{{Streaming Aerial Video Textures}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Advanced Concepts},
  pages =	{336--345},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-19-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2010},
  volume =	{1},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.336},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-27148},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.SciViz.2010.336},
  annote =	{Keywords: Molecuar Dynamics, Saliency, Simulation}
}

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