Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 1



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Complete Issue
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 1, January 2017, Complete Issue

Abstract
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 1, January 2017, Complete Issue

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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 1, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@Article{DagRep.7.1,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 1, January 2017, Complete Issue}},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{1},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-73145},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 1, January 2017, Complete Issue}
}
Document
Front Matter
Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 7, Issue 1, 2017

Abstract
Table of Contents, Frontmatter

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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp. i-ii, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@Article{DagRep.7.1.i,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 7, Issue 1, 2017}},
  pages =	{i--ii},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{1},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.1.i},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-73133},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.1.i},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 7, Issue 1, 2017}
}
Document
Functoriality in Geometric Data (Dagstuhl Seminar 17021)

Authors: Mirela Ben-Chen, Frédéderic Chazal, Leonidas J. Guibas, and Maks Ovsjanikov


Abstract
This report provides an overview of the talks at the Dagstuhl Seminar 17021 "Functoriality in Geometric Data". The seminar brought together researchers interested in the fundamental questions of similarity and correspondence across geometric data sets, which include collections of GPS traces, images, 3D shapes and other types of geometric data. A recent trend, emerging independently in multiple theoretical and applied communities, is to understand networks of geometric data sets through their relations and interconnections, a point of view that can be broadly described as exploiting the functoriality of data, which has a long tradition associated with it in mathematics. Functoriality, in its broadest form, is the notion that in dealing with any kind of mathematical object, it is at least as important to understand the transformations or symmetries possessed by the object or the family of objects to which it belongs, as it is to study the object itself. This general idea has led to deep insights into the structure of various geometric spaces as well as to state-of-the-art methods in various application domains. The talks spanned a wide array of subjects under the common theme of functoriality, including: the analysis of geometric collections, optimal transport for geometric datasets, deep learning applications and many more.

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Mirela Ben-Chen, Frédéderic Chazal, Leonidas J. Guibas, and Maks Ovsjanikov. Functoriality in Geometric Data (Dagstuhl Seminar 17021). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp. 1-18, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@Article{benchen_et_al:DagRep.7.1.1,
  author =	{Ben-Chen, Mirela and Chazal, Fr\'{e}d\'{e}deric and Guibas, Leonidas J. and Ovsjanikov, Maks},
  title =	{{Functoriality in Geometric Data (Dagstuhl Seminar 17021)}},
  pages =	{1--18},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{1},
  editor =	{Ben-Chen, Mirela and Chazal, Fr\'{e}d\'{e}deric and Guibas, Leonidas J. and Ovsjanikov, Maks},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.1.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-71484},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.1.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: computational geometry, data analysis, geometry processing}
}
Document
Automated Program Repair (Dagstuhl Seminar 17022)

Authors: Sunghun Kim, Claire Le Goues, Michael Pradel, and Abhik Roychoudhury


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 17022 "Automated Program Repair". The seminar participants presented and discussed their research through formal and informal presentations. In particular, the seminar covered work related to search-based program repair, semantic program repair, and repair of non-functional properties. As a result of the seminar, several participants plan to launch various follow-up activities, such as a program repair competition, which would help to further establish and guide this young field of research.

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Sunghun Kim, Claire Le Goues, Michael Pradel, and Abhik Roychoudhury. Automated Program Repair (Dagstuhl Seminar 17022). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp. 19-31, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@Article{kim_et_al:DagRep.7.1.19,
  author =	{Kim, Sunghun and Le Goues, Claire and Pradel, Michael and Roychoudhury, Abhik},
  title =	{{Automated Program Repair (Dagstuhl Seminar 17022)}},
  pages =	{19--31},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{1},
  editor =	{Kim, Sunghun and Le Goues, Claire and Pradel, Michael and Roychoudhury, Abhik},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.1.19},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-71767},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.1.19},
  annote =	{Keywords: Program repair, program analysis, software engineering}
}
Document
Planning and Robotics (Dagstuhl Seminar 17031)

Authors: Malik Ghallab, Nick Hawes, Daniele Magazzeni, Brian C. Williams, and Andrea Orlandini


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 17031 on "Planning and Robotics". The seminar was concerned with the synergy between the research areas of Automated Planning & Scheduling and Robotics. The motivation for this seminar was to bring together researchers from the two communities and people from the Industry in order to foster a broader interest in the integration of planning and deliberation approaches to sensory-motor functions in robotics. The first part of the seminar was dedicated to eight sessions composed on several topics in which attendees had the opportunity to present position statements. Then, the second part was composed by six panel sessions where attendees had the opportunity to further discuss the position statements and issues raised in previous sessions. The main outcomes were a greater common understanding of planning and robotics issues and challenges, and a greater appreciation of crossover between different perspectives, i.e., spanning from low level control to high-level cognitive approaches for autonomous robots. Different application domains were also discussed in which the deployment of planning and robotics methodologies and technologies constitute an added value.

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Malik Ghallab, Nick Hawes, Daniele Magazzeni, Brian C. Williams, and Andrea Orlandini. Planning and Robotics (Dagstuhl Seminar 17031). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp. 32-73, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@Article{ghallab_et_al:DagRep.7.1.32,
  author =	{Ghallab, Malik and Hawes, Nick and Magazzeni, Daniele and Williams, Brian C. and Orlandini, Andrea},
  title =	{{Planning and Robotics (Dagstuhl Seminar 17031)}},
  pages =	{32--73},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{1},
  editor =	{Ghallab, Malik and Hawes, Nick and Magazzeni, Daniele and Williams, Brian C. and Orlandini, Andrea},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.1.32},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-72451},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.1.32},
  annote =	{Keywords: adjustable autonomy, artificial intelligence, automated planning and scheduling, goal reasoning, human-robot interaction, plan execution, robotics}
}
Document
Network Function Virtualization in Software Defined Infrastructures (Dagstuhl Seminar 17032)

Authors: David Hausheer, Oliver Hohlfeld, Diego R. López, Bruce MacDowell Maggs, and Costin Raiciu


Abstract
The softwarization of networks by introducing concepts such as Software-Defined Networking (SDN) or Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) currently massively changes network management by enabling more flexible communication networks. The main goal of this seminar was to gather researchers from academia, industry, and standardization bodies to discuss a joint perspective on research questions in the field of NFV. This report contains talk summaries, reports on the discussion groups, as well as the personal statements and main challenges contributed by the seminar participants.

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David Hausheer, Oliver Hohlfeld, Diego R. López, Bruce MacDowell Maggs, and Costin Raiciu. Network Function Virtualization in Software Defined Infrastructures (Dagstuhl Seminar 17032). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp. 74-102, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@Article{hausheer_et_al:DagRep.7.1.74,
  author =	{Hausheer, David and Hohlfeld, Oliver and López, Diego R. and Maggs, Bruce MacDowell and Raiciu, Costin},
  title =	{{Network Function Virtualization in Software Defined Infrastructures (Dagstuhl Seminar 17032)}},
  pages =	{74--102},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{1},
  editor =	{Hausheer, David and Hohlfeld, Oliver and López, Diego R. and Maggs, Bruce MacDowell and Raiciu, Costin},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.1.74},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-72464},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.1.74},
  annote =	{Keywords: flexible network management, network function virtualization, software-defined networking}
}
Document
Randomization in Parameterized Complexity (Dagstuhl Seminar 17041)

Authors: Marek Cygan, Fedor V. Fomin, Danny Hermelin, and Magnus Wahlström


Abstract
Dagstuhl Seminar 17041 "Randomization in Parameterized Complexity" took place from January 22nd to January 27th 2017 with the objective to bridge the gap between randomization and parameterized complexity theory. This report documents the talks held during the seminar as well as the open questions arised in the discussion sessions.

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Marek Cygan, Fedor V. Fomin, Danny Hermelin, and Magnus Wahlström. Randomization in Parameterized Complexity (Dagstuhl Seminar 17041). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp. 103-128, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@Article{cygan_et_al:DagRep.7.1.103,
  author =	{Cygan, Marek and Fomin, Fedor V. and Hermelin, Danny and Wahlstr\"{o}m, Magnus},
  title =	{{Randomization in Parameterized Complexity (Dagstuhl Seminar 17041)}},
  pages =	{103--128},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{1},
  editor =	{Cygan, Marek and Fomin, Fedor V. and Hermelin, Danny and Wahlstr\"{o}m, Magnus},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.1.103},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-72479},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.1.103},
  annote =	{Keywords: fixed-parameter tractability, intractability, parameterized complexity, randomness}
}
Document
From Characters to Understanding Natural Language (C2NLU): Robust End-to-End Deep Learning for NLP (Dagstuhl Seminar 17042)

Authors: Phil Blunsom, Kyunghyun Cho, Chris Dyer, and Hinrich Schütze


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 17042 "From Characters to Understanding Natural Language (C2NLU): Robust End-to-End Deep Learning for NLP". The seminar brought together researchers from different fields, including natural language processing, computational linguistics, deep learning and general machine learning. 31 participants from 22 academic and industrial institutions discussed advantages and challenges of using characters, i.e., "raw text", as input for deep learning models instead of language-specific tokens. Eight talks provided overviews of different topics, approaches and challenges in current natural language processing research. In five working groups, the participants discussed current natural language processing/understanding topics in the context of character-based modeling, namely, morphology, machine translation, representation learning, end-to-end systems and dialogue. In most of the discussions, the need for a more detailed model analysis was pointed out. Especially for character-based input, it is important to analyze what a deep learning model is able to learn about language - about tokens, morphology or syntax in general. For an efficient and effective understanding of language, it might furthermore be beneficial to share representations learned from multiple objectives to enable the models to focus on their specific understanding task instead of needing to learn syntactic regularities of language first. Therefore, benefits and challenges of transfer learning were an important topic of the working groups as well as of the panel discussion and the final plenary discussion.

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Phil Blunsom, Kyunghyun Cho, Chris Dyer, and Hinrich Schütze. From Characters to Understanding Natural Language (C2NLU): Robust End-to-End Deep Learning for NLP (Dagstuhl Seminar 17042). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp. 129-157, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@Article{blunsom_et_al:DagRep.7.1.129,
  author =	{Blunsom, Phil and Cho, Kyunghyun and Dyer, Chris and Sch\"{u}tze, Hinrich},
  title =	{{From Characters to Understanding Natural Language (C2NLU): Robust End-to-End Deep Learning for NLP (Dagstuhl Seminar 17042)}},
  pages =	{129--157},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{1},
  editor =	{Blunsom, Phil and Cho, Kyunghyun and Dyer, Chris and Sch\"{u}tze, Hinrich},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.1.129},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-72489},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.1.129},
  annote =	{Keywords: Natural Language Understanding, Artificial Intelligence, Deep Learning, Natural Language Processing, Representation Learning}
}
Document
Theory and Applications of Behavioural Types (Dagstuhl Seminar 17051)

Authors: Simon Gay, Vasco T. Vasconcelos, Philip Wadler, and Nobuko Yoshida


Abstract
This report documents the programme and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 17051 "Theory and Applications of Behavioural Types". Behavioural types describe the dynamic aspects of programs, in contrast to data types, which describe the fixed structure of data. Perhaps the most well-known form of behavioural types is session types, which are type-theoretic specifications of communication protocols. More generally, behavioural types include typestate systems, which specify state-dependent availability of operations; choreographies, which specify collective communication behaviour; and behavioural contracts. In recent years, research activity in behavioural types has increased dramatically, in both theoretical and practical directions. Theoretical work has explored new relationships between established behavioural type systems and areas such as linear logic, automata theory, process calculus testing theory, dependent type theory, and model-checking. On the practical side, there are several implementations of programming languages, programming language extensions, software development tools, and runtime monitoring systems, which are becoming mature enough to apply to real-world case studies. The seminar brought together researchers from the established, largely European, research community in behavioural types, and other participants from outside Europe and from related research topics such as effect systems and actor-based languages. The questions that we intended to explore included: - How can we understand the relationships between the foundations of session types in terms of linear logic, automata, denotational models, and other type theories? - How can the scope and applicability of behavioural types be increased by incorporating ideas and approaches from gradual typing and dependent type theory? - What is the relationship, in terms of expressivity and tractability, between behavioural types and other verification techniques such as model-checking? - What are the theoretical and practical obstacles to delivering behavioural types to software developers in a range of mainstream programming languages? - What are the advantages and disadvantages of incorporating behavioural types into standard programming languages or designing new languages directly based on the foundations of session types? - How can we evaluate the effectiveness of behavioural types in programming languages and software development?

Cite as

Simon Gay, Vasco T. Vasconcelos, Philip Wadler, and Nobuko Yoshida. Theory and Applications of Behavioural Types (Dagstuhl Seminar 17051). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp. 158-189, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2017)


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@Article{gay_et_al:DagRep.7.1.158,
  author =	{Gay, Simon and Vasconcelos, Vasco T. and Wadler, Philip and Yoshida, Nobuko},
  title =	{{Theory and Applications of Behavioural Types (Dagstuhl Seminar 17051)}},
  pages =	{158--189},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2017},
  volume =	{7},
  number =	{1},
  editor =	{Gay, Simon and Vasconcelos, Vasco T. and Wadler, Philip and Yoshida, Nobuko},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.7.1.158},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-72497},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.7.1.158},
  annote =	{Keywords: Behavioural Types, Programming Languages, Runtime Verification, Type Systems}
}

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