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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 2



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Complete Issue
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 2, February 2018, Complete Issue

Abstract
Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 2, February 2018, Complete Issue

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Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 2, February 2018, Complete Issue. In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 2, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{DagRep.8.2,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 2, February 2018, Complete Issue}},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{2},
  editor =	{},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.2},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-97377},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.2},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 2, February 2018, Complete Issue}
}
Document
Front Matter
Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 8, Issue 2, 2018

Abstract
Table of Contents, Frontmatter

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Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 8, Issue 2, 2018. In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 2, pp. i-ii, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{DagRep.8.2.i,
  title =	{{Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 8, Issue 2, 2018}},
  pages =	{i--ii},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{2},
  editor =	{},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.2.i},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-97364},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.2.i},
  annote =	{Keywords: Dagstuhl Reports, Table of Contents, Volume 8, Issue 2, 2018}
}
Document
Evidence About Programmers for Programming Language Design (Dagstuhl Seminar 18061)

Authors: Andreas Stefik, Bonita Sharif, Brad. A. Myers, and Stefan Hanenberg


Abstract
The report documents the program and outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 18061 "Evidence About Programmers for Programming Language Design". The seminar brought together a diverse group of researchers from the fields of computer science education, programming languages, software engineering, human-computer interaction, and data science. At the seminar, participants discussed methods for designing and evaluating programming languages that take the needs of programmers directly into account. The seminar included foundational talks to introduce the breadth of perspectives that were represented among the participants; then, groups formed to develop research agendas for several subtopics, including novice programmers, cognitive load, language features, and love of programming languages. The seminar concluded with a discussion of the current SIGPLAN artifact evaluation mechanism and the need for evidence standards in empirical studies of programming languages.

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Andreas Stefik, Bonita Sharif, Brad. A. Myers, and Stefan Hanenberg. Evidence About Programmers for Programming Language Design (Dagstuhl Seminar 18061). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 2, pp. 1-25, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{stefik_et_al:DagRep.8.2.1,
  author =	{Stefik, Andreas and Sharif, Bonita and Myers, Brad. A. and Hanenberg, Stefan},
  title =	{{Evidence About Programmers for Programming Language Design (Dagstuhl Seminar 18061)}},
  pages =	{1--25},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{2},
  editor =	{Stefik, Andreas and Sharif, Bonita and Myers, Brad. A. and Hanenberg, Stefan},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.2.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-92887},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.2.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: programming language design, computer science education, empirical software engineering, eye tracking, evidence standards}
}
Document
Planning and Operations Research (Dagstuhl Seminar 18071)

Authors: J. Christopher Beck, Daniele Magazzeni, Gabriele Röger, and Willem-Jan Van Hoeve


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 18071 "Planning and Operations Research". The seminar brought together researchers in the areas of Artificial Intelligence (AI) Planning, Constraint Programming, and Operations Research. All three areas have in common that they deal with complex systems where a huge space of interacting options makes it almost impossible to humans to take optimal or even good decisions. From a historical perspective, operations research stems from the application of mathematical methods to (mostly) industrial applications while planning and constraint programming emerged as subfields of artificial intelligence where the emphasis was traditionally more on symbolic and logical search techniques for the intelligent selection and sequencing of actions to achieve a set of goals. Therefore operations research often focuses on the allocation of scarce resources such as transportation capacity, machine availability, production materials, or money, while planning focuses on the right choice of actions from a large space of possibilities. While this difference results in problems in different complexity classes, it is often possible to cast the same problem as an OR, CP, or planning problem. In this seminar, we investigated the commonalities and the overlap between the different areas to learn from each other's expertise, bring the communities closer together, and transfer knowledge about solution techniques that can be applied in all areas.

Cite as

J. Christopher Beck, Daniele Magazzeni, Gabriele Röger, and Willem-Jan Van Hoeve. Planning and Operations Research (Dagstuhl Seminar 18071). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 2, pp. 26-63, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{beck_et_al:DagRep.8.2.26,
  author =	{Beck, J. Christopher and Magazzeni, Daniele and R\"{o}ger, Gabriele and Van Hoeve, Willem-Jan},
  title =	{{Planning and Operations Research (Dagstuhl Seminar 18071)}},
  pages =	{26--63},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{2},
  editor =	{Beck, J. Christopher and Magazzeni, Daniele and R\"{o}ger, Gabriele and Van Hoeve, Willem-Jan},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.2.26},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-92894},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.2.26},
  annote =	{Keywords: Artificial Intelligence, Automated Planning and Scheduling, Constraint Programming, Dynamic Programming, Heuristic Search, Mixed Integer Programming, Operations Research, Optimization, Real-world Applications, Reasoning under Uncertainty}
}
Document
Designing and Implementing Algorithms for Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Optimization (Dagstuhl Seminar 18081)

Authors: Pierre Bonami, Ambros M. Gleixner, Jeff Linderoth, and Ruth Misener


Abstract
Mathematical models for optimal decisions often require both nonlinear and discrete components. These mixed-integer nonlinear programs (MINLP) may be used to optimize the energy use of large industrial plants, integrate renewable sources into energy networks, design biological and biomedical systems, and address numerous other applications of societal importance. The first MINLP algorithms and software were designed by application engineers. While these efforts initially proved useful, scientists, engineers, and practitioners have realized that a transformational shift in technology will be required for MINLP to achieve its full potential. MINLP has transitioned to a forefront position in computer science, with researchers actively developing MINLP theory, algorithms, and implementations. Even with their concerted effort, algorithms and available software are often unable to solve practically-sized instances of these important models. Current obstacles include characterizing the computability boundary, effectively exploiting known optimization technologies for specialized classes of MINLP, and effectively using logical formulas holistically throughout algorithms.

Cite as

Pierre Bonami, Ambros M. Gleixner, Jeff Linderoth, and Ruth Misener. Designing and Implementing Algorithms for Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Optimization (Dagstuhl Seminar 18081). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 2, pp. 64-87, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{bonami_et_al:DagRep.8.2.64,
  author =	{Bonami, Pierre and Gleixner, Ambros M. and Linderoth, Jeff and Misener, Ruth},
  title =	{{Designing and Implementing Algorithms for Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Optimization (Dagstuhl Seminar 18081)}},
  pages =	{64--87},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{2},
  editor =	{Bonami, Pierre and Gleixner, Ambros M. and Linderoth, Jeff and Misener, Ruth},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.2.64},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-92909},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.2.64},
  annote =	{Keywords: Complexity, Mathematical optimization, Mathematical software, Mixed-integer optimization, Nonlinear optimization, Numerical issues, Optimization algorithms}
}
Document
Formal Methods for the Synthesis of Biomolecular Circuits (Dagstuhl Seminar 18082)

Authors: Yaakov Benenson, Neil Dalchau, Heinz Koeppl, and Oded Maler


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 18082 "Formal Methods for the Synthesis of Biomolecular Circuits". Synthetic biology aims for the rational bottom-up engineering of new biological functionalities. Recent years have witnessed an increase in the degree of "rationality" in the design of synthetic biomolecular circuits. With it, fewer design-build-test cycles were necessary to achieve a desired circuit performance. Most of these success stories reported the realization of logic circuits, typically operating via regulation of gene expression and/or direct manipulation of DNA sequences with recombinases, executing combinatorial and sometimes sequential logic. This was often achieved with the help of two ingredients, a library of previously well-characterized parts and some computational modeling. Hence, although circuits in synthetic biology are still by far less understood and characterized than electronic circuits, the opportunity for the formal synthesis of circuit designs with respect to a behavioral specification starts to emerge in synthetic biology.

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Yaakov Benenson, Neil Dalchau, Heinz Koeppl, and Oded Maler. Formal Methods for the Synthesis of Biomolecular Circuits (Dagstuhl Seminar 18082). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 2, pp. 88-100, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{benenson_et_al:DagRep.8.2.88,
  author =	{Benenson, Yaakov and Dalchau, Neil and Koeppl, Heinz and Maler, Oded},
  title =	{{Formal Methods for the Synthesis of Biomolecular Circuits (Dagstuhl Seminar 18082)}},
  pages =	{88--100},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{2},
  editor =	{Benenson, Yaakov and Dalchau, Neil and Koeppl, Heinz and Maler, Oded},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.2.88},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-92912},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.2.88},
  annote =	{Keywords: Synthetic biology, Electronic design automation, Program synthesis and verification}
}
Document
Data Consistency in Distributed Systems: Algorithms, Programs, and Databases (Dagstuhl Seminar 18091)

Authors: Annette Bieniusa, Alexey Gotsman, Bettina Kemme, and Marc Shapiro


Abstract
For decades distributed computing has been mainly an academic subject. Today, it has become mainstream: our connected world demands applications that are inherently distributed, and the usage of shared, distributed, peer-to-peer or cloud-computing infrastructures are increasingly common. However, writing distributed applications that are both correct and well distributed (e.g., highly available) is extremely challenging. In fact, there exists a fundamental trade-off between data consistency, availability, and the ability to tolerate failures. This trade-off has implications on the design of the entire distributed computing infrastructure, including storage systems, compilers and runtimes, application development frameworks and programming languages. Unfortunately, this also has significant implications on the programming model exposed to the designers and developers of applications. We need to enable programmers who are not experts in these subtle aspects to build distributed applications that remain correct in the presence of concurrency, failures, churn, replication, dynamically-changing and partial information, high load, absence of a single line of time, etc. This Dagstuhl Seminar proposes to bring together researchers and practitioners in the areas of distributed systems, programming languages, verifications, and databases. We would like to understand the lessons learnt in building scalable and correct distributed systems, the design patterns that have emerged, and explore opportunities for distilling these into programming methodologies, programming tools, and languages to make distributed computing easier and more accessible. Main issues in discussion: Application writers are constantly making trade-offs between consistency and availability. What kinds of tools and methodologies can we provide to simplify this decision making? How does one understand the implications of a design choice? Available systems are hard to design, test and debug. Do existing testing and debugging tools suffice for identifying and isolating bugs due to weak consistency? How can these problems be identified in production using live monitoring? Can we formalize commonly desired (generic) correctness (or performance) properties? How can we teach programmers about these formalisms and make them accessible to a wide audience? Can we build verification or testing tools to check that systems have these desired correctness properties? How do applications achieve the required properties, while ensuring adequate performance, in practice? What design patterns and idioms work well? To what degree can these properties be guaranteed by the platform (programming language, libraries, and runtime system)? What are the responsibilities of the application developer, and what tools and information does she have?

Cite as

Annette Bieniusa, Alexey Gotsman, Bettina Kemme, and Marc Shapiro. Data Consistency in Distributed Systems: Algorithms, Programs, and Databases (Dagstuhl Seminar 18091). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 2, pp. 101-121, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{bieniusa_et_al:DagRep.8.2.101,
  author =	{Bieniusa, Annette and Gotsman, Alexey and Kemme, Bettina and Shapiro, Marc},
  title =	{{Data Consistency in Distributed Systems: Algorithms, Programs, and Databases (Dagstuhl Seminar 18091)}},
  pages =	{101--121},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{2},
  editor =	{Bieniusa, Annette and Gotsman, Alexey and Kemme, Bettina and Shapiro, Marc},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.2.101},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-92923},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.2.101},
  annote =	{Keywords: consistency, CRDTs, Distributed Algorithms, distributed computing, Distributed Systems, partitioning, replication, Strong Consistency, transactions, Weak Consistency}
}
Document
The Logical Execution Time Paradigm: New Perspectives for Multicore Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 18092)

Authors: Rolf Ernst, Stefan Kuntz, Sophie Quinton, and Martin Simons


Abstract
This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 18092 "The Logical Execution Time Paradigm: New Perspectives for Multicore Systems". The seminar brought together academic and industrial researchers working on challenges related to the Logical Execution Time Paradigm (LET). The main purpose was to promote a closer interaction between the sub-communities involved in the application of LET to multicore systems, with a particular emphasis on the automotive domain.

Cite as

Rolf Ernst, Stefan Kuntz, Sophie Quinton, and Martin Simons. The Logical Execution Time Paradigm: New Perspectives for Multicore Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 18092). In Dagstuhl Reports, Volume 8, Issue 2, pp. 122-149, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2018)


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@Article{ernst_et_al:DagRep.8.2.122,
  author =	{Ernst, Rolf and Kuntz, Stefan and Quinton, Sophie and Simons, Martin},
  title =	{{The Logical Execution Time Paradigm: New Perspectives for Multicore Systems (Dagstuhl Seminar 18092)}},
  pages =	{122--149},
  journal =	{Dagstuhl Reports},
  ISSN =	{2192-5283},
  year =	{2018},
  volume =	{8},
  number =	{2},
  editor =	{Ernst, Rolf and Kuntz, Stefan and Quinton, Sophie and Simons, Martin},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DagRep.8.2.122},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-92939},
  doi =		{10.4230/DagRep.8.2.122},
  annote =	{Keywords: Automotive domain, logical execution time, multicore architectures, real-time systems}
}

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