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Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2

Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors



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Publication Details

  • published at: 2011-10-01
  • Publisher: Schloss-Dagstuhl - Leibniz Zentrum für Informatik
  • ISBN: 978-3-939897-26-2
  • DBLP: db/conf/dagstuhl/P11009

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Document
Complete Volume
DFU, Volume 2, Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors, Complete Volume

Authors: Hans Hagen


Abstract
DFU, Volume 2, Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors, Complete Volume

Cite as

Hans Hagen. DFU, Volume 2, Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors, Complete Volume. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2012)


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@Collection{DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011,
  title =	{{DFU, Volume 2, Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors, Complete Volume}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2012},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-36013},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011},
  annote =	{Keywords: Computer Graphics, Image Processing and Computer Vision, Physical Sciences and Engineering, Life and Medical Sciences}
}
Document
Frontmatter, Table of Contents, Preface, List of Authors

Authors: Hans Hagen


Abstract
Frontmatter, Table of Contents, Preface, List of Authors

Cite as

Hans Hagen. Frontmatter, Table of Contents, Preface, List of Authors. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 0:i-0:xiv, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{hagen:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.i,
  author =	{Hagen, Hans},
  title =	{{Frontmatter, Table of Contents, Preface, List of Authors}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{0:i--0:xiv},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.i},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32822},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.i},
  annote =	{Keywords: Frontmatter, Table of Contents, Preface, List of Authors}
}
Document
CakES: Cake Metaphor for Analyzing Safety Issues of Embedded Systems

Authors: Yasmin I. Al-Zokari, Taimur Khan, Daniel Schneider, Dirk Zeckzer, and Hans Hagen


Abstract
Embedded systems are used everywhere. They are complex systems whose failure may cause death or injury to people or may damage the environment are required to be safety safe. Therefore, these systems need to be analyzed. Fault tree analysis is a common way for performing safety analysis. It generates a large amount of interconnected data that itself needs to be analyzed to help different domain experts (e.g., engineers and safety analysts) in their decisions for improving the system’s safety. Additional difficulties occur for the experts in communication and in linking the data (e.g., information of basic events or minimal cut sets) to the actual parts of the system (model). Therefore, a large amount of time and effort is being spent on discussions, searching,and navigating through the data. To overcome this, we present a new metaphor called "CakES" consisting of multiple views visualizing the data generated by fault tree analysis and linking them to the actual parts of the model by intuitive interaction. Using the interaction techniques of CakES the user can directly explore the safety related data without navigating through the fault tree while retaining an overview of all critical aspects in the model.

Cite as

Yasmin I. Al-Zokari, Taimur Khan, Daniel Schneider, Dirk Zeckzer, and Hans Hagen. CakES: Cake Metaphor for Analyzing Safety Issues of Embedded Systems. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 1-16, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{alzokari_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.1,
  author =	{Al-Zokari, Yasmin I. and Khan, Taimur and Schneider, Daniel and Zeckzer, Dirk and Hagen, Hans},
  title =	{{CakES: Cake Metaphor for Analyzing Safety Issues of Embedded Systems}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{1--16},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.1},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32844},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.1},
  annote =	{Keywords: Fault Tree Analysis, minimal cut sets, basic events, information visualization, scientific visualization, engineering, tiled-wall, multiple monitor sy}
}
Document
2D Tensor Field Segmentation

Authors: Cornelia Auer, Jaya Sreevalsan-Nair, Valentin Zobel, and Ingrid Hotz


Abstract
We present a topology-based segmentation as means for visualizing 2D symmetric tensor fields. The segmentation uses directional as well as eigenvalue characteristics of the underlying field to delineate cells of similar (or dissimilar) behavior in the tensor field. A special feature of the resulting cells is that their shape expresses the tensor behavior inside the cells and thus also can be considered as a kind of glyph representation. This allows a qualitative comprehension of important structures of the field. The resulting higher-level abstraction of the field provides valuable analysis. The extraction of the integral topological skeleton using both major and minor eigenvector fields serves as a structural pre-segmentation and renders all directional structures in the field. The resulting curvilinear cells are bounded by tensorlines and already delineate regions of equivalent eigenvector behavior. This pre-segmentation is further adaptively refined to achieve a segmentation reflecting regions of similar eigenvalue and eigenvector characteristics. Cell refinement involves both subdivision and merging of cells achieving a predetermined resolution, accuracy and uniformity of the segmentation. The buildingblocks of the approach can be intuitively customized to meet the demands or different applications. Application to tensor fields from numerical stress simulations demonstrates the effectiveness of our method.

Cite as

Cornelia Auer, Jaya Sreevalsan-Nair, Valentin Zobel, and Ingrid Hotz. 2D Tensor Field Segmentation. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 17-35, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{auer_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.17,
  author =	{Auer, Cornelia and Sreevalsan-Nair, Jaya and Zobel, Valentin and Hotz, Ingrid},
  title =	{{2D Tensor Field Segmentation}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{17--35},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.17},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32853},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.17},
  annote =	{Keywords: Tensorfield visualization, surface topology}
}
Document
A

Authors: Jean-Paul Balabanian and Eduard Gröller


Abstract
This paper describes the concept of A-space. A-space is the space where visualization algorithms reside. Every visualization algorithm is a unique point in A-space. Integrated visualizations can be interpreted as an interpolation between known algorithms. The void between algorithms can be considered as a visualization opportunity where a new point in A-space can be reconstructed and new integrated visualizations can be created.

Cite as

Jean-Paul Balabanian and Eduard Gröller. A. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 36-47, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{balabanian_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.36,
  author =	{Balabanian, Jean-Paul and Gr\"{o}ller, Eduard},
  title =	{{A}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{36--47},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.36},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32866},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.36},
  annote =	{Keywords: Illustrative Visualization, Integrated Visualization}
}
Document
Interpolants Induced by Marching Cases

Authors: Hamish Carr and Eoin Murphy


Abstract
Visualization depends among other things on the interpolant used in generating images. One way to assess this is to construct case tables for Marching Cubes that represent the chosen interpolant accuracy. Instead, we show how to construct the interpolants induced by Marching Cases for comparison and assessment, how to extend this approach to Marching Squares, Cubes and Hypercubes, and how to construct an interpolant which is computationally equivalent to the digital rules conventionally used in image processing. Furthermore, we demonstrate that unlike tetrahedral meshes, geometric measurements over multi-linear mesh cells are inherently non-linear and cannot be summed as in the Contour Spectrum.

Cite as

Hamish Carr and Eoin Murphy. Interpolants Induced by Marching Cases. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 48-58, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{carr_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.48,
  author =	{Carr, Hamish and Murphy, Eoin},
  title =	{{Interpolants Induced by Marching Cases}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{48--58},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.48},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32837},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.48},
  annote =	{Keywords: Interpolation, Marching Cubes, Isosurfaces}
}
Document
Comparative Visualization Using Cross-Mesh Field Evaluations and Derived Quantities

Authors: Hank Childs, Sean Ahern, Jeremy Meredith, Mark Miller, and Kenneth I. Joy


Abstract
We present a data-level comparative visualization system that utilizes two key pieces of technology: (1) cross-mesh field evaluation - algorithms to evaluate a field from one mesh onto another - and (2) a highly flexible system for creating new derived quantities. In contrast to previous comparative visualization efforts, which focused on "A-B" comparisons, our system is able to compare many related simulations in a single analysis. Types of possible novel comparisons include comparisons of ensembles of data generated through parameter studies, or comparisons of time-varying data. All portions of the system have been parallelized and our results are applicable to petascale data sets.

Cite as

Hank Childs, Sean Ahern, Jeremy Meredith, Mark Miller, and Kenneth I. Joy. Comparative Visualization Using Cross-Mesh Field Evaluations and Derived Quantities. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 59-72, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{childs_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.59,
  author =	{Childs, Hank and Ahern, Sean and Meredith, Jeremy and Miller, Mark and Joy, Kenneth I.},
  title =	{{Comparative Visualization Using Cross-Mesh Field Evaluations and Derived Quantities}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{59--72},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.59},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32870},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.59},
  annote =	{Keywords: Comparative Visualization, Cross-Mesh Field Evaluation, Derived Quantity}
}
Document
On the Computation of Integral Curves in Adaptive Mesh Refinement Vector Fields

Authors: Eduard Deines, Gunther H. Weber, Christoph Garth, Brian Van Straalen, and Sergey Borovikov


Abstract
Integral curves, such as streamlines, streaklines, pathlines, and timelines, are an essential tool in the analysis of vector field structures, offering straightforward and intuitive interpretation of visualization results. While such curves have a long-standing tradition in vector field visualization, their application to Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulation results poses unique problems. AMR is a highly effective discretization method for a variety of physical simulation problems and has recently been applied to the study of vector fields in flow and magnetohydrodynamic applications. The cell-centered nature of AMR data and discontinuities in the vector field representation arising from AMR level boundaries complicate the application of numerical integration methods to compute integral curves. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to alleviate these problems and show its application to streamline visualization in an AMR model of the magnetic field of the solar system as well as to a simulation of two incompressible viscous vortex rings merging.

Cite as

Eduard Deines, Gunther H. Weber, Christoph Garth, Brian Van Straalen, and Sergey Borovikov. On the Computation of Integral Curves in Adaptive Mesh Refinement Vector Fields. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 73-91, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{deines_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.73,
  author =	{Deines, Eduard and Weber, Gunther H. and Garth, Christoph and Van Straalen, Brian and Borovikov, Sergey},
  title =	{{On the Computation of Integral Curves in Adaptive Mesh Refinement Vector Fields}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{73--91},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.73},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32880},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.73},
  annote =	{Keywords: integration-based visualization, streamlines, interpolation, adaptive mesh refinement}
}
Document
Integrating Semantics into the Visualization Process

Authors: Sebastian Escarza, Martin L. Larrea, Dana K. Urribarri, Silvia M. Castro, and Sergio R. Martig


Abstract
Most of today's visualization systems give the user considerable control over the visualization process. Many parameters might be changed until the obtention of a satisfactory visualization. The visualization process is a very complex exploration activity and, even for skilled users, it can be difficult to arrive at an effective visualization. We propose the construction of a visualization prototype to assist users and designers throughout the stages of the visualization process, and the integration of such process with a reasoning procedure that allows the configuration of the visualization, based on the entailed conclusions. We are working on a formal representation of the Visualization field. We aim to establish a common visualization vocabulary, include the underlying semantics, and enable the definition of visualization specifications that can be executed by a visualization engine with ontological support. An ontological description of a visualization should be enough to specify the visualization and, thus, to generate a runtime environment that is able to bring that visualization to life. The visualization ontology defines the vocabulary. With the addition of inference rules to the system, we can derive conclusions about visualization properties that allow to enhance the visualization, and guide the user throughout the entire process toward an effective result.

Cite as

Sebastian Escarza, Martin L. Larrea, Dana K. Urribarri, Silvia M. Castro, and Sergio R. Martig. Integrating Semantics into the Visualization Process. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 92-102, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{escarza_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.92,
  author =	{Escarza, Sebastian and Larrea, Martin L. and Urribarri, Dana K. and Castro, Silvia M. and Martig, Sergio R.},
  title =	{{Integrating Semantics into the Visualization Process}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{92--102},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.92},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-33044},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.92},
  annote =	{Keywords: semantic driven visualization, ontology, visualization, knowledge representation}
}
Document
Simulation and Visualization of Medical Application to the Inner Ear of the Guinea Pig to Reduce Animal Experiments

Authors: Martin Hering-Bertram, Norbert Siedow, Oliver Tse, Stefan K. Plontke, and Ruth Gill


Abstract
We present a novel approach to simulate drug application to the inner ear of the guinea pig with the goal to reduce animal experiments and to increase the accuracy of measurements. The framework is based on a tetrahedral grid representing the individual compartments of the cochlea, associated with a finite element model used to simulate medical diffusion and clearance. In a first simulation scenario, we were able to compute transfer coefficients between the inner compartments of the ear, validating experiments from the literature, and to prove the existence of clearance at the inner scala tympani. In a second scenario, the cochlea was unwound to obtain a one-dimensional model for efficient simulation-based transfer coefficient identification. These coefficients are useful to predict the impact of novel medication application systems.

Cite as

Martin Hering-Bertram, Norbert Siedow, Oliver Tse, Stefan K. Plontke, and Ruth Gill. Simulation and Visualization of Medical Application to the Inner Ear of the Guinea Pig to Reduce Animal Experiments. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 103-117, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{heringbertram_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.103,
  author =	{Hering-Bertram, Martin and Siedow, Norbert and Tse, Oliver and Plontke, Stefan K. and Gill, Ruth},
  title =	{{Simulation and Visualization of Medical Application to the Inner Ear of the Guinea Pig to Reduce Animal Experiments}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{103--117},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.103},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32895},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.103},
  annote =	{Keywords: Cochlea, Perilymph, Spiral Ligament, Round Window Application, Modiolar Communication Routes, Numerical Simulation, Parameter Identification}
}
Document
Information-theoretic Analysis of Unsteady Data

Authors: Heike Jänicke


Abstract
The temporal evolution of scientific data is of high relevance in many fields of application. Understanding the dynamics over time is a crucial step in understanding the underlying system. The availability of large scale parallel computers has led to a finer and finer resolution of simulation data, which makes it difficult to detect all relevant changes of the system by watching a video or a set of snapshots. In recent years, algorithms for the automatic detection of coherent temporal structures have been developed that allow for an identification of interesting areas and time steps in unsteady data. With such techniques, the user can be guided to interesting subsets of the data or a video can be automatically created that does not occlude relevant aspects of the simulation. In this paper, we give an overview over the different techniques, show how their combination helps to gain deeper insight and look at different directions for further improvement. Two CFD simulations are used to illustrate the different techniques.

Cite as

Heike Jänicke. Information-theoretic Analysis of Unsteady Data. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 118-128, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{janicke:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.118,
  author =	{J\"{a}nicke, Heike},
  title =	{{Information-theoretic Analysis of Unsteady Data}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{118--128},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.118},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32908},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.118},
  annote =	{Keywords: Information theory, unsteady data}
}
Document
Construction of Implicit Surfaces from Point Clouds Using a Feature-based Approach

Authors: Patric Keller, Oliver Kreylos, Eric S. Cowgill, Louise H. Kellogg, and Martin Hering-Bertram


Abstract
We present a novel feature-based approach to surface generation from point clouds in three-dimensional space obtained by terrestrial and airborne laser scanning. In a first step, we apply a multiscale clustering and classification of local point set neighborhoods by considering their geometric shape. Corresponding feature values quantify the similarity to curve-like, surface-like, and solid-like shapes. For selecting and extracting surface features, we build a hierarchical trivariate B-spline representation of this surface feature function. Surfaces are extracted with a variant of marching cubes (MC), providing an inner and outer shell that are merged into a single non-manifold surface component at the field’s ridges. By adapting the isovalue of the feature function the user may control surface topology and thus adapt the extracted features to the noise level of the underlying point cloud. User control and adaptive approximation make our method robust for noisy and complex point data.

Cite as

Patric Keller, Oliver Kreylos, Eric S. Cowgill, Louise H. Kellogg, and Martin Hering-Bertram. Construction of Implicit Surfaces from Point Clouds Using a Feature-based Approach. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 129-143, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{keller_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.129,
  author =	{Keller, Patric and Kreylos, Oliver and Cowgill, Eric S. and Kellogg, Louise H. and Hering-Bertram, Martin},
  title =	{{Construction of Implicit Surfaces from Point Clouds Using a Feature-based Approach}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{129--143},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.129},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-33032},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.129},
  annote =	{Keywords: 3D Point Clouds, Surface Reconstruction, Implicit Surfaces}
}
Document
Framework for Comprehensive Size and Resolution Utilization of Arbitrary Displays

Authors: Taimur Khan, Daniel Schneider, Yasmin Al-Zokari, Dirk Zeckzer, and Hans Hagen


Abstract
Scalable large high-resolution displays such as tiled displays are imperative for the visualization of large and complex datasets. In recent times, the relatively low costs for setting up large display systems have led to an highly increased usage of such devices. However, it is equally vital to optimally utilize their size and resolution to effectively explore such data through a combination of diverse visualizations, views, and interaction mechanisms. In this paper, we present a lightweight dispatcher framework which facilitates input management, focus management, and the execution of several interrelated yet independent visualizations. The approach is deliberately kept flexible to not only tackle different hardware configurations but also the amount of visualization applications to be implemented. This is demonstrated through a scenario that executes four interrelated visualizations equally well on both a 5 PC tiled-wall and a single desktop. The key contribution of this work is the ability to extend the tiled-wall to work with multiple applications for enhanced size and resolution utilization of such displays.

Cite as

Taimur Khan, Daniel Schneider, Yasmin Al-Zokari, Dirk Zeckzer, and Hans Hagen. Framework for Comprehensive Size and Resolution Utilization of Arbitrary Displays. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 144-159, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{khan_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.144,
  author =	{Khan, Taimur and Schneider, Daniel and Al-Zokari, Yasmin and Zeckzer, Dirk and Hagen, Hans},
  title =	{{Framework for Comprehensive Size and Resolution Utilization of Arbitrary Displays}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{144--159},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.144},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32916},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.144},
  annote =	{Keywords: Large and High-res Displays, Coordinated and Multiple Views, Human Computer Interaction}
}
Document
Salient Frame Detection for Molecular Dynamics Simulations

Authors: Youngmin Kim, Robert Patro, Cheuk Yiu Ip, Dianne P. O’Leary, and Andriy Anishkin


Abstract
Recent advances in sophisticated computational techniques have facilitated simulation of incrediblydetailed time-varying trajectories and in the process have generated vast quantities of simulation data. The current tools to analyze and comprehend large-scale time-varying data, however, lag far behind our ability to produce such simulation data. Saliency-based analysis can be applied to time-varying 3D datasets for the purpose of summarization, abstraction, and motion analysis. As the sizes of time-varying datasets continue to grow, it becomes more and more difficult to comprehend vast amounts of data and information in a short period of time. In this paper, we use eigenanalysis to generate orthogonal basis functions over sliding windows to characterize regions of unusual deviations and significant trends. Our results show that motion subspaces provide an effective technique for summarization of large molecular dynamics trajectories.

Cite as

Youngmin Kim, Robert Patro, Cheuk Yiu Ip, Dianne P. O’Leary, and Andriy Anishkin. Salient Frame Detection for Molecular Dynamics Simulations. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 160-175, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{kim_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.160,
  author =	{Kim, Youngmin and Patro, Robert and Yiu Ip, Cheuk and O’Leary, Dianne P. and Anishkin, Andriy},
  title =	{{Salient Frame Detection for Molecular Dynamics Simulations}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{160--175},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.160},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32926},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.160},
  annote =	{Keywords: Saliency based analysis, Molecular Dynamics, Simulation}
}
Document
3D Reconstruction of Human Ribcage and Lungs and Improved Visualization of Lung X-ray Images Through Removal of the Ribcage

Authors: Christopher Koehler and Thomas Wischgoll


Abstract
The analysis of X-ray imagery is the standard pre-screening approach for lung cancer. Unlike CTscans, X-ray images only provide a 2D projection of the patient’s body. As a result occlusions, i.e. some body parts covering other areas of the body within this projected X-ray image, can make the analysis more difficult. For example, the ribs, a predominant feature within the X-ray image, can cover up cancerous nodules, making it difficult for the Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) systems or even a doctor to detect such nodules. Hence, this paper describes a methodology for reconstructing a patient-specific 3D model of the ribs and lungs based on a set of lateral and PA X-ray images, which allows the system to calculate simulated X-ray images of just the ribs. The simulated X-ray images can then be subtracted from the original PA X-ray image resulting in an image where most of the cross hatching pattern caused by the ribs is removed to improve on automated diagnostic processes.

Cite as

Christopher Koehler and Thomas Wischgoll. 3D Reconstruction of Human Ribcage and Lungs and Improved Visualization of Lung X-ray Images Through Removal of the Ribcage. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 176-187, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{koehler_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.176,
  author =	{Koehler, Christopher and Wischgoll, Thomas},
  title =	{{3D Reconstruction of Human Ribcage and Lungs and Improved Visualization of Lung X-ray Images Through Removal of the Ribcage}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{176--187},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.176},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32935},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.176},
  annote =	{Keywords: 3D Reconstruction, X-ray images}
}
Document
A Visual Approach to Analysis of Stress Tensor Fields

Authors: Andrea Kratz, Björn Meyer, and Ingrid Hotz


Abstract
We present a visual approach for the exploration of stress tensor fields. In contrast to common tensor visualization methods that only provide a single view to the tensor field, we pursue the idea of providing various perspectives onto the data in attribute and object space. Especially in the context of stress tensors, advanced tensor visualization methods have a young tradition. Thus, we propose a combination of visualization techniques domain experts are used to with statistical views of tensor attributes. The application of this concept to tensor fields was achieved by extending the notion of shape space. It provides an intuitive way of finding tensor invariants that represent relevant physical properties. Using brushing techniques, the user can select features in attribute space, which are mapped to displayable entities in a three-dimensional hybrid visualization in object space. Volume rendering serves as context, while glyphs encode the whole tensor information in focus regions. Tensorlines can be included to emphasize directionally coherent features in the tensor field. We show that the benefit of such a multi-perspective approach is manifold. Foremost, it provides easy access to the complexity of tensor data. Moreover, including well-known analysis tools, such as Mohr diagrams, users can familiarize themselves gradually with novel visualization methods. Finally, by employing a focus-driven hybrid rendering, we significantly reduce clutter, which was a major problem of other three-dimensional tensor visualization methods.

Cite as

Andrea Kratz, Björn Meyer, and Ingrid Hotz. A Visual Approach to Analysis of Stress Tensor Fields. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 188-211, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{kratz_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.188,
  author =	{Kratz, Andrea and Meyer, Bj\"{o}rn and Hotz, Ingrid},
  title =	{{A Visual Approach to Analysis of Stress Tensor Fields}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{188--211},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.188},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32962},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.188},
  annote =	{Keywords: Tensor Field, Visualization and Analysis}
}
Document
Abstract Feature Space Representation for Volumetric Transfer Function Exploration

Authors: Ross Maciejewski, Yun Jang, David S. Ebert, and Kelly P. Gaither


Abstract
The application of n-dimensional transfer functions for feature segmentation has become increasingly popular in volume rendering. Recent work has focused on the utilization of higher order dimensional transfer functions incorporating spatial dimensions (x,y, and z) along with traditional feature space dimensions (value and value gradient). However, as the dimensionality increases, it becomes exceedingly difficult to abstract the transfer function into an intuitive and interactive workspace. In this work we focus on populating the traditional two-dimensional histogram with a set of derived metrics from the spatial (x, y and z) and feature space (value, value gradient, etc.) domain to create a set of abstract feature space transfer function domains. Current two-dimensional transfer function widgets typically consist of a two-dimensional histogram where each entry in the histogram represents the number of voxels that maps to that entry. In the case of an abstract transfer function design, the amount of spatial variance at that histogram coordinate is mapped instead, thereby relating additional information about the data abstraction in the projected space. Finally, a non-parametric kernel density estimation approach for feature space clustering is applied in the abstracted space, and the resultant transfer functions are discussed with respect to the space abstraction.

Cite as

Ross Maciejewski, Yun Jang, David S. Ebert, and Kelly P. Gaither. Abstract Feature Space Representation for Volumetric Transfer Function Exploration. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 212-221, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{maciejewski_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.212,
  author =	{Maciejewski, Ross and Jang, Yun and Ebert, David S. and Gaither, Kelly P.},
  title =	{{Abstract Feature Space Representation for Volumetric Transfer Function Exploration}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{212--221},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.212},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32955},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.212},
  annote =	{Keywords: Volumetric Transfer Function, Abstract Feature Space}
}
Document
Variational Level-Set Detection of Local Isosurfaces from Unstructured Point-based Volume Data

Authors: Vladimir Molchanov, Paul Rosenthal, and Lars Linsen


Abstract
A standard approach for visualizing scalar volume data is the extraction of isosurfaces. The most efficient methods for surface extraction operate on regular grids. When data is given on unstructured point-based samples, regularization can be applied but may introduce interpolation errors. We propose a method for smooth isosurface visualization that operates directly on unstructured point-based volume data avoiding any resampling. We derive a variational formulation for smooth local isosurface extraction using an implicit surface representation in form of a level-set approach, deploying Moving Least Squares (MLS) approximation, and operating on a kd-tree. The locality of our approach has two aspects: first, our algorithm extracts only those components of the isosurface, which intersect a subdomain of interest; second, the action of the main term in the governing equation is concentrated near the current isosurface position. Both aspects reduce the computation times per level-set iteration. As for most level-set methods a reinitialization procedure is needed, but we also consider a modified algorithm where this step is eliminated. The final isosurface is extracted in form of a point cloud representation. We present a novel point completion scheme that allows us to handle highly adaptive point sample distributions. Subsequently, splat-based or mere (shaded) point rendering is applied. We apply our method to several synthetic and real-world data sets to demonstrate its validity and efficiency.

Cite as

Vladimir Molchanov, Paul Rosenthal, and Lars Linsen. Variational Level-Set Detection of Local Isosurfaces from Unstructured Point-based Volume Data. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 222-239, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{molchanov_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.222,
  author =	{Molchanov, Vladimir and Rosenthal, Paul and Linsen, Lars},
  title =	{{Variational Level-Set Detection of Local Isosurfaces from Unstructured Point-based Volume Data}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{222--239},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.222},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32941},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.222},
  annote =	{Keywords: Level-set, isosurface extraction, visualization in astrophysics, particle simulations}
}
Document
Reflections on QuestVis: A Visualization System for an Environmental Sustainability Model

Authors: Tamara Munzner, Aaron Barsky, and Matt Williams


Abstract
We present lessons learned from the iterative design of QuestVis, a visualization interface for the QUEST environmental sustainability model. The QUEST model predicts the effects of policy choices in the present using scenarios of future outcomes that consist of several hundred indicators. QuestVis treats this information as a high-dimensional dataset, and shows the relationship between input choices and output indicators using linked views and a compact multilevel browser for indicator values. A first prototype also featured an overview of the space of all possible scenarios based on dimensionality reduction, but this representation was deemed to be be inappropriate for a target audience of people unfamiliar with data analysis. A second prototype with a considerably simplified and streamlined interface was created that supported comparison between multiple scenarios using a flexible approach to aggregation. However, QuestVis was not deployed because of a mismatch between the design goals of the project and the true needs of the target user community, who did not need to carry out detailed analysis of the high-dimensional dataset. We discuss this breakdown in the context of a nested model for visualization design and evaluation.

Cite as

Tamara Munzner, Aaron Barsky, and Matt Williams. Reflections on QuestVis: A Visualization System for an Environmental Sustainability Model. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 240-259, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{munzner_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.240,
  author =	{Munzner, Tamara and Barsky, Aaron and Williams, Matt},
  title =	{{Reflections on QuestVis: A Visualization System for an Environmental Sustainability Model }},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{240--259},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.240},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32970},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.240},
  annote =	{Keywords: high-dimensional visualization, dimensionality reduction, linked views, simulation visualization, design study}
}
Document
Generation of Adaptive Streak Surfaces Using Moving Least Squares

Authors: Harald Obermaier, Martin Hering-Bertram, Jörg Kuhnert, and Hans Hagen


Abstract
We introduce a novel method for the generation of fully adaptive streak surfaces in time-varying flow fields based on particle advection and adaptive mesh refinement. Moving least squares approximation plays an important role in multiple stages of the proposed algorithm, which adaptively refines the surface based on curvature approximation and circumradius properties of the underlying Delaunay mesh. We utilize the grid-less Moving Least Squares approximation method for both curvature and surface estimation as well as vector field evaluation during particle advection. Delaunay properties of the surface triangulation are guaranteed by edge flipping operations on the progressive surface mesh. The results of this work illustrate the benefit of adaptivity techniques to streak surface generation and provide the means for a qualitative analysis of the presented approach.

Cite as

Harald Obermaier, Martin Hering-Bertram, Jörg Kuhnert, and Hans Hagen. Generation of Adaptive Streak Surfaces Using Moving Least Squares. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 260-275, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{obermaier_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.260,
  author =	{Obermaier, Harald and Hering-Bertram, Martin and Kuhnert, J\"{o}rg and Hagen, Hans},
  title =	{{Generation of Adaptive Streak Surfaces Using Moving Least Squares}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{260--275},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.260},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32982},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.260},
  annote =	{Keywords: scattered, flow, streak surface, adaptivity, moving least squares}
}
Document
Interactive Isocontouring of High-Order Surfaces

Authors: Christian Pagot, Joachim Vollrath, Filip Sadlo, Daniel Weiskopf, Thomas Ertl, and João Luiz Dihl Comba


Abstract
Scientists and engineers are making increasingly use of hp-adaptive discretization methods to compute simulations. While techniques for isocontouring the high-order data generated by these methods have started to appear, they typically do not facilitate interactive data exploration. This work presents a novel interactive approach for approximate isocontouring of high-order data. The method is based on a two-phase hybrid rendering algorithm. In the first phase, coarsely seeded particles are guided by the gradient of the field for obtaining an initial sampling of the isosurface in object space. The second phase performs ray casting in the image space neighborhood of the initial samples. Since the neighborhood is small, the initial guesses tend to be close to the isosurface, leading to accelerated root finding and thus efficient rendering. The object space phase affects the density of the coarse samples on the isosurface, which can lead to holes in the final rendering and overdraw. Thus, we also propose a heuristic, based on dynamical systems theory, that adapts the neighborhood of the seeds in order to obtain a better coverage of the surface. Results for datasets from computational fluid dynamics are shown and performance measurements for our GPU implementation are given.

Cite as

Christian Pagot, Joachim Vollrath, Filip Sadlo, Daniel Weiskopf, Thomas Ertl, and João Luiz Dihl Comba. Interactive Isocontouring of High-Order Surfaces. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 276-291, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{pagot_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.276,
  author =	{Pagot, Christian and Vollrath, Joachim and Sadlo, Filip and Weiskopf, Daniel and Ertl, Thomas and Comba, Jo\~{a}o Luiz Dihl},
  title =	{{Interactive Isocontouring of High-Order Surfaces}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{276--291},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.276},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-33052},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.276},
  annote =	{Keywords: High-order finite elements, isosurface visualization, GPU}
}
Document
HCI in Medical Visualization

Authors: Bernhard Preim


Abstract
Research in medical visualization lead to a remarkable collection of algorithms for efficiently exploring medical imaging data, such as CT, MRI and DTI. However, widespread use of such algorithms requires careful parameterization, integration of individual algorithms in solutions for real-world problems in diagnosis, treatment planning and intraoperative navigation. In the field of HCI, input devices, interaction techniques as well as a process for achieving usable, useful, and attractive user interfaces are explored. Findings from HCI may serve as a starting point to significantly improve visual computing solutions in medical diagnosis and treatment. We discuss general issues, such as input devices for medical visualization, and selected examples.

Cite as

Bernhard Preim. HCI in Medical Visualization. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 292-310, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{preim:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.292,
  author =	{Preim, Bernhard},
  title =	{{HCI in Medical Visualization}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{292--310},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.292},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-32999},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.292},
  annote =	{Keywords: Medical visualization, Human Computer Interaction, Input devices, Scenarios}
}
Document
Visualizing Spatial Partitions

Authors: Penny Rheingans, Blazej Bulka, and Marie desJardins


Abstract
We describe an application of geospatial visualization and AI search techniques to the problem of school redistricting, in which students are assigned to home schools within a county or school district. This is a multicriteria optimization problem in which competing objectives must be considered, such as school capacity, busing costs, and socioeconomic distribution. Additionally, school assignments need to be made for three different levels (elementary, middle, and high school) in a way which allows children to move from one school to the next with a cohort of sufficient size. Because of the complexity of the decision-making problem, tools are needed to help end users generate, evaluate, and compare alternative school assignment plans. A key goal of our research is to aid users in finding multiple qualitatively different redistricting plans that represent different tradeoffs in the decision space. We present visualization techniques which can be used to visualize the quality of spatial partititioning plans, compare the alternatives presented by different plans, and understand the interrelationships of plans at different educational levels. We demonstrate these techniques on partitions created through both manual construction and intelligient search processes for the population data of the school district of Howard County, Maryland.

Cite as

Penny Rheingans, Blazej Bulka, and Marie desJardins. Visualizing Spatial Partitions. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 311-321, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{rheingans_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.311,
  author =	{Rheingans, Penny and Bulka, Blazej and desJardins, Marie},
  title =	{{Visualizing Spatial Partitions}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{311--321},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.311},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-33006},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.311},
  annote =	{Keywords: geospatial visualization, heuristic search, color mapping, multivariate visualization}
}
Document
Feature Extraction for DW-MRI Visualization: The State of the Art and Beyond

Authors: Thomas Schultz


Abstract
By measuring the anisotropic self-diffusion rates of water, Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DW-MRI) provides a unique noninvasive probe of fibrous tissue. In particular, it has been explored widely for imaging nerve fiber tracts in the human brain. Geometric features provide a quick visual overview of the complex datasets that arise from DW-MRI. At the same time, they build a bridge towards quantitative analysis, by extracting explicit representations of structures in the data that are relevant to specific research questions. Therefore, features in DWMRI data are an active research topic not only within scientific visualization, but have received considerable interest from the medical image analysis, neuroimaging, and computer vision communities. It is the goal of this paper to survey contributions from all these fields, concentrating on streamline clustering, edge detection and segmentation, topological methods, and extraction of anisotropy creases. We point out interrelations between these topics and make suggestions for future research.

Cite as

Thomas Schultz. Feature Extraction for DW-MRI Visualization: The State of the Art and Beyond. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 322-345, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{schultz:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.322,
  author =	{Schultz, Thomas},
  title =	{{Feature Extraction for DW-MRI Visualization: The State of the Art and Beyond}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{322--345},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.322},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-33010},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.322},
  annote =	{Keywords: Diffusion-Weighted MRI, dMRI, DT-MRI, DTI, HARDI, Streamline Clustering, Edge Detection, DW-MRI Segmentation, Tensor Topology, Crease Surfaces}
}
Document
Previewing Volume Decomposition Through Optimal Viewpoints

Authors: Shigeo Takahashi, Issei Fujishiro, Yuriko Takeshima, and Chongke Bi


Abstract
Understanding a volume dataset through a 2D display is a complex task because it usually contains multi-layered inner structures that inevitably cause undesirable overlaps when projected onto the display. This requires us to identify feature subvolumes embedded in the given volume and then visualize them on the display so that we can clarify their relative positions. This article therefore introduces a new feature-driven approach to previewing volumes that respects both the 3D nested structures of the feature subvolumes and their 2D arrangement in the projection by minimizing their occlusions. The associated process begins with tracking the topological transitions of isosurfaces with respect to the scalar field, in order to decompose the given volume dataset into feature components called interval volumes while extracting their nested structures. The volume dataset is then projected from the optimal viewpoint that archives the best balanced visibility of the decomposed components. The position of the optimal viewpoint is updated each time when we peel off an outer component with our interface by calculating the sum of the viewpoint optimality values for the remaining components. Several previewing examples are demonstrated to illustrate that the present approach can offer an effective means of traversing volumetric inner structures both in an interactive and automatic fashion with the interface.

Cite as

Shigeo Takahashi, Issei Fujishiro, Yuriko Takeshima, and Chongke Bi. Previewing Volume Decomposition Through Optimal Viewpoints. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 346-359, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{takahashi_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.346,
  author =	{Takahashi, Shigeo and Fujishiro, Issei and Takeshima, Yuriko and Bi, Chongke},
  title =	{{Previewing Volume Decomposition Through Optimal Viewpoints}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{346--359},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.346},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-33062},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.346},
  annote =	{Keywords: Interval volumes, viewpoint selection, feature-driven approach, volume peeling, nested structures}
}
Document
Modeling Multiresolution 3D Scalar Fields through Regular Simplex Bisection

Authors: Kenneth Weiss and Leila De Floriani


Abstract
We review modeling techniques for multiresolution three-dimensional scalar fields based on a discretization of the field domain into nested tetrahedral meshes generated through regular simplex bisection. Such meshes are described through hierarchical data structures and their representation is characterized by the modeling primitive used. The primary conceptual distinction among the different approaches proposed in the literature is whether they treat tetrahedra or clusters of tetrahedra, called diamonds, as the modeling primitive. We first focus on representations for the modeling primitive and for nested meshes. Next, we survey the applications of these meshes to modeling multiresolution 3D scalar fields, with an emphasis on interactive visualization. We also consider the relationship of such meshes to octrees. Finally, we discuss directions for further research.

Cite as

Kenneth Weiss and Leila De Floriani. Modeling Multiresolution 3D Scalar Fields through Regular Simplex Bisection. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 360-377, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{weiss_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.360,
  author =	{Weiss, Kenneth and De Floriani, Leila},
  title =	{{Modeling Multiresolution 3D Scalar Fields through Regular Simplex Bisection}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{360--377},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.360},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-33021},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.360},
  annote =	{Keywords: Tetrahedral bisection, hierarchy of diamonds, mesh-based multiresolution models, regular simplex bisection, scientific visualization}
}
Document
ViSSaAn: Visual Support for Safety Analysis

Authors: Yi Yang, Dirk Zeckzer, Peter Liggesmeyer, and Hans Hagen


Abstract
Safety of technical systems are becoming more and more important nowadays. Fault trees and minimal cut sets are usually used to attack the problems of assessing safety-critical systems. A visualization system named ViSSaAn, consisting of a matrix view, is proposed that supports an efficient safety analysis based on the information from these techniques. Interactions such as zooming and grouping are provided to support the task of finding the safety problems from the analysis information. An example based on real data shows the usefulness of ViSSaAn.

Cite as

Yi Yang, Dirk Zeckzer, Peter Liggesmeyer, and Hans Hagen. ViSSaAn: Visual Support for Safety Analysis. In Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors. Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, Volume 2, pp. 378-395, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2011)


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@InCollection{yang_et_al:DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.378,
  author =	{Yang, Yi and Zeckzer, Dirk and Liggesmeyer, Peter and Hagen, Hans},
  title =	{{ViSSaAn: Visual Support for Safety Analysis}},
  booktitle =	{Scientific Visualization: Interactions, Features, Metaphors},
  pages =	{378--395},
  series =	{Dagstuhl Follow-Ups},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-26-2},
  ISSN =	{1868-8977},
  year =	{2011},
  volume =	{2},
  editor =	{Hagen, Hans},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.378},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-33073},
  doi =		{10.4230/DFU.Vol2.SciViz.2011.378},
  annote =	{Keywords: Safety Analysis, Fault Tree Analysis, Minimal Cut Sets, Safety Visualization, Information Visualization}
}

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