4 Search Results for "Marshall, Andrew M."


Document
Knowledge Problems in Security Protocols: Going Beyond Subterm Convergent Theories

Authors: Saraid Dwyer Satterfield, Serdar Erbatur, Andrew M. Marshall, and Christophe Ringeissen

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 260, 8th International Conference on Formal Structures for Computation and Deduction (FSCD 2023)


Abstract
We introduce a new form of restricted term rewrite system, the graph-embedded term rewrite system. These systems, and thus the name, are inspired by the graph minor relation and are more flexible extensions of the well-known homeomorphic-embedded property of term rewrite systems. As a motivating application area, we consider the symbolic analysis of security protocols, and more precisely the two knowledge problems defined by the deduction problem and the static equivalence problem. In this field restricted term rewrite systems, such as subterm convergent ones, have proven useful since the knowledge problems are decidable for such systems. However, many of the same decision procedures still work for examples of systems which are "beyond subterm convergent". However, the applicability of the corresponding decision procedures to these examples must often be proven on an individual basis. This is due to the problem that they don't fit into an existing syntactic definition for which the procedures are known to work. Here we show that many of these systems belong to a particular subclass of graph-embedded convergent systems, called contracting convergent systems. On the one hand, we show that the knowledge problems are decidable for the subclass of contracting convergent systems. On the other hand, we show that the knowledge problems are undecidable for the class of graph-embedded systems.

Cite as

Saraid Dwyer Satterfield, Serdar Erbatur, Andrew M. Marshall, and Christophe Ringeissen. Knowledge Problems in Security Protocols: Going Beyond Subterm Convergent Theories. In 8th International Conference on Formal Structures for Computation and Deduction (FSCD 2023). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 260, pp. 30:1-30:19, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2023)


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@InProceedings{dwyersatterfield_et_al:LIPIcs.FSCD.2023.30,
  author =	{Dwyer Satterfield, Saraid and Erbatur, Serdar and Marshall, Andrew M. and Ringeissen, Christophe},
  title =	{{Knowledge Problems in Security Protocols: Going Beyond Subterm Convergent Theories}},
  booktitle =	{8th International Conference on Formal Structures for Computation and Deduction (FSCD 2023)},
  pages =	{30:1--30:19},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-277-8},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2023},
  volume =	{260},
  editor =	{Gaboardi, Marco and van Raamsdonk, Femke},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.FSCD.2023.30},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-180148},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.FSCD.2023.30},
  annote =	{Keywords: Term rewriting, security protocols, verification}
}
Document
Combined Hierarchical Matching: the Regular Case

Authors: Serdar Erbatur, Andrew M. Marshall, and Christophe Ringeissen

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 228, 7th International Conference on Formal Structures for Computation and Deduction (FSCD 2022)


Abstract
Matching algorithms are often central sub-routines in many areas of automated reasoning. They are used in areas such as functional programming, rule-based programming, automated theorem proving, and the symbolic analysis of security protocols. Matching is related to unification but provides a somewhat simplified problem. Thus, in some cases, we can obtain a matching algorithm even if the unification problem is undecidable. In this paper we consider a hierarchical approach to constructing matching algorithms. The hierarchical method has been successful for developing unification algorithms for theories defined over a constructor sub-theory. We show how the approach can be extended to matching problems which allows for the development, in a modular way, of hierarchical matching algorithms. Here we focus on regular theories, where both sides of each equational axiom have the same set of variables. We show that the combination of two hierarchical matching algorithms leads to a hierarchical matching algorithm for the union of regular theories sharing only a common constructor sub-theory.

Cite as

Serdar Erbatur, Andrew M. Marshall, and Christophe Ringeissen. Combined Hierarchical Matching: the Regular Case. In 7th International Conference on Formal Structures for Computation and Deduction (FSCD 2022). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 228, pp. 6:1-6:22, Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2022)


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@InProceedings{erbatur_et_al:LIPIcs.FSCD.2022.6,
  author =	{Erbatur, Serdar and Marshall, Andrew M. and Ringeissen, Christophe},
  title =	{{Combined Hierarchical Matching: the Regular Case}},
  booktitle =	{7th International Conference on Formal Structures for Computation and Deduction (FSCD 2022)},
  pages =	{6:1--6:22},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-233-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2022},
  volume =	{228},
  editor =	{Felty, Amy P.},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.FSCD.2022.6},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-162879},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.FSCD.2022.6},
  annote =	{Keywords: Matching, combination problem, equational theories}
}
Document
Blame Tracking and Type Error Debugging

Authors: Sheng Chen and John Peter Campora III

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 136, 3rd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2019)


Abstract
In this work, we present an unexpected connection between gradual typing and type error debugging. Namely, we illustrate that gradual typing provides a natural way to defer type errors in statically ill-typed programs, providing more feedback than traditional approaches to deferring type errors. When evaluating expressions that lead to runtime type errors, the usefulness of the feedback depends on blame tracking, the defacto approach to locating the cause of such runtime type errors. Unfortunately, blame tracking suffers from the bias problem for type error localization in languages with type inference. We illustrate and formalize the bias problem for blame tracking, present ideas for adapting existing type error debugging techniques to combat this bias, and outline further challenges.

Cite as

Sheng Chen and John Peter Campora III. Blame Tracking and Type Error Debugging. In 3rd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2019). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 136, pp. 2:1-2:14, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2019)


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@InProceedings{chen_et_al:LIPIcs.SNAPL.2019.2,
  author =	{Chen, Sheng and Campora III, John Peter},
  title =	{{Blame Tracking and Type Error Debugging}},
  booktitle =	{3rd Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2019)},
  pages =	{2:1--2:14},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-95977-113-9},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2019},
  volume =	{136},
  editor =	{Lerner, Benjamin S. and Bod{\'\i}k, Rastislav and Krishnamurthi, Shriram},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2019.2},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-105451},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2019.2},
  annote =	{Keywords: Blame tracking, type error debugging, gradual typing, type inference}
}
Document
The Need for Language Support for Fault-Tolerant Distributed Systems

Authors: Cezara Dragoi, Thomas A. Henzinger, and Damien Zufferey

Published in: LIPIcs, Volume 32, 1st Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2015)


Abstract
Fault-tolerant distributed algorithms play an important role in many critical/high-availability applications. These algorithms are notoriously difficult to implement correctly, due to asynchronous communication and the occurrence of faults, such as the network dropping messages or computers crashing. Nonetheless there is surprisingly little language and verification support to build distributed systems based on fault-tolerant algorithms. In this paper, we present some of the challenges that a designer has to overcome to implement a fault-tolerant distributed system. Then we review different models that have been proposed to reason about distributed algorithms and sketch how such a model can form the basis for a domain-specific programming language. Adopting a high-level programming model can simplify the programmer's life and make the code amenable to automated verification, while still compiling to efficiently executable code. We conclude by summarizing the current status of an ongoing language design and implementation project that is based on this idea.

Cite as

Cezara Dragoi, Thomas A. Henzinger, and Damien Zufferey. The Need for Language Support for Fault-Tolerant Distributed Systems. In 1st Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2015). Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs), Volume 32, pp. 90-102, Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik (2015)


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@InProceedings{dragoi_et_al:LIPIcs.SNAPL.2015.90,
  author =	{Dragoi, Cezara and Henzinger, Thomas A. and Zufferey, Damien},
  title =	{{The Need for Language Support for Fault-Tolerant Distributed Systems}},
  booktitle =	{1st Summit on Advances in Programming Languages (SNAPL 2015)},
  pages =	{90--102},
  series =	{Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (LIPIcs)},
  ISBN =	{978-3-939897-80-4},
  ISSN =	{1868-8969},
  year =	{2015},
  volume =	{32},
  editor =	{Ball, Thomas and Bodík, Rastislav and Krishnamurthi, Shriram and Lerner, Benjamin S. and Morriset, Greg},
  publisher =	{Schloss Dagstuhl -- Leibniz-Zentrum f{\"u}r Informatik},
  address =	{Dagstuhl, Germany},
  URL =		{https://drops.dagstuhl.de/entities/document/10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2015.90},
  URN =		{urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-50192},
  doi =		{10.4230/LIPIcs.SNAPL.2015.90},
  annote =	{Keywords: Programming language, Fault-tolerant distributed algorithms, Automated verification}
}
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